Ancient Earth globe

  
Via:  Bob Nelson  •  one month ago  •  30 comments

By:   Ian Webster (iwebst)

Ancient Earth globe



Earth looked very different long ago.

Search for addresses across 750 million years of Earth's history.

To comment, please join group Be Reasonable!

Be Reasonable!


original

Very cool.

That's why.

Very, very cool!



S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



original

This image is clickable.

It takes you to an amazing interactive map, where you can observe any part of the world at any time over geographic history.


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Bob Nelson
1  seeder  Bob Nelson    one month ago

The name of the planet may be "Earth", but it really should be "Water"!

 
 
 
Gordy327
1.1  Gordy327  replied to  Bob Nelson @1    one month ago

My, how much things change in only 105 million years.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
1.1.1  seeder  Bob Nelson  replied to  Gordy327 @1.1    one month ago

Time flies! 

 
 
 
bccrane
1.1.2  bccrane  replied to  Gordy327 @1.1    one month ago

It also shows how fluid the earth is.  There is more going on under the surface then many people realize.

 
 
 
Gordy327
1.1.3  Gordy327  replied to  Bob Nelson @1.1.1    one month ago

Indeed. And that's only 100M years out of the 4.5 billion year history of our planet.

 
 
 
Gordy327
1.1.4  Gordy327  replied to  bccrane @1.1.2    one month ago

True. Imagine how Earth will look in another 100M years. North America and Europe could collide.

 
 
 
bccrane
1.1.5  bccrane  replied to  Gordy327 @1.1.4    one month ago

Right now it looks as though NA and Europe are getting further apart pushed back in both directions from the mid-Atlantic ridge. 

 
 
 
Gordy327
1.1.6  Gordy327  replied to  bccrane @1.1.5    one month ago

Earth might end up with a new Pangea in its distant future. 

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
2  Buzz of the Orient    one month ago

Wow!!!  That was fascinating.  What a great interactive image. 

 
 
 
Kathleen
3  Kathleen    one month ago

Had fun with it, my home was back and forth in water.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
3.1  seeder  Bob Nelson  replied to  Kathleen @3    one month ago

I did the same thing... with the same result.  jrSmiley_81_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Freefaller
4  Freefaller    one month ago

Looks fun, I'll give it a run when I get home.

 
 
 
Freefaller
4.1  Freefaller  replied to  Freefaller @4    one month ago

Dammit couldn't get it to load

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
4.1.1  seeder  Bob Nelson  replied to  Freefaller @4.1    one month ago

I don't know how to help. For me, it works on both Windows and Android. 

 
 
 
TᵢG
4.1.2  TᵢG  replied to  Freefaller @4.1    one month ago

Your machine might not have enough memory.   I would cold boot it and then bring up one browser with just the one tab on Bob's article and see if that works.

A very slow Internet connection could affect this too.

 
 
 
Freefaller
4.1.3  Freefaller  replied to  TᵢG @4.1.2    one month ago

Thanks TiG but no luck, I guess it's too much for my machine

 
 
 
TᵢG
4.1.4  TᵢG  replied to  Freefaller @4.1.3    one month ago

You are likely correct.

 
 
 
TᵢG
5  TᵢG    one month ago

Fascinating stuff.  

I was thinking about the amount of data, the sophistication of the geophysics and the raw computation that went into assembling this animation so that we could all look up to 750 million years into our planet's past.   This view of the past was not possible to do until ~1970s and even then the costs would have been prohibitive.   The animation would not be possible to do until ~1990s and nowhere near the resolution we casually browsed on our personal computers.

Only recently have we had the means to use science to understand our environment (and ourselves).   An amazing time to be alive.   Think of how much we all know compared to our parent's generation.

 
 
 
Gordy327
5.1  Gordy327  replied to  TᵢG @5    one month ago

Isn't science & technology grand? It's something that seems quite underappreciated in this country.

 
 
 
TᵢG
5.1.1  TᵢG  replied to  Gordy327 @5.1    one month ago

And amazingly not understood by many.   By 'understood' I am not talking about having knowledge of the underlying equations, models, etc. but rather just understanding what scientists actually do, the methods they employ and their professional motivations.

 
 
 
Gordy327
5.1.2  Gordy327  replied to  TᵢG @5.1.1    one month ago

If that's what you mean, I'd go so far to say it's not understood by most. 

 
 
 
TᵢG
5.1.3  TᵢG  replied to  Gordy327 @5.1.2    one month ago

Seems that way to me too.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
5.2  seeder  Bob Nelson  replied to  TᵢG @5    one month ago

A modern smartphone has more computing power than had an Apollo moon capsule. 

 
 
 
TᵢG
5.2.1  TᵢG  replied to  Bob Nelson @5.2    one month ago

Absolutely correct by a factor in the millions.   My iPhone kicks the butt of the IBM mainframe that ran my entire university.   My iPhone has more computing power than all of the world's computers combined in the 1960s.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
5.2.2  seeder  Bob Nelson  replied to  TᵢG @5.2.1    one month ago

Ah, the IBM that my college acquired during my junior year. It occupied an entire room, and got more air conditioning than the rest of the school. 

Punch cards! 

 
 
 
TᵢG
5.2.3  TᵢG  replied to  Bob Nelson @5.2.2    one month ago

Grad students had trays of punched cards and a very real fear of a read error.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
5.2.4  seeder  Bob Nelson  replied to  TᵢG @5.2.3    one month ago

Shoe boxes worked pretty well. 

 
 
 
Split Personality
5.2.5  Split Personality  replied to  TᵢG @5.2.3    one month ago

I ran the final exam 7 times with the professor and no one could figure out why it would not compute.

He passed me.

It was the first case of the hanging chad, lol

 
 
 
TᵢG
5.2.6  TᵢG  replied to  Split Personality @5.2.5    one month ago

jrSmiley_100_smiley_image.jpg

 
 
 
evilgenius
6  evilgenius    one month ago

This is so cool! 

 
 
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