China cuts video game time for kids to 3 hours each week

  
Via:  Buzz of the Orient  •  2 months ago  •  10 comments

By:   Ben Gilbert - Business Insider

China cuts video game time for kids to 3 hours each week
 

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China cuts video game time for kids to 3 hours each week

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© Michael Kraus/EyeEm/Getty Images  Michael Kraus/EyeEm/Getty Images

  • China is imposing a strict time limit on video game playing for children.
  • Kids are allowed one hour for gaming, from 8 to 9 p.m., on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.
  • The restrictions are further cutting back the already limited time kids in China have to play games.

In China, people under 18 are having their gaming time cut to just three hours each week - one hour on Friday, one on Saturday, and one on Sunday, from 8 to 9 p.m.

That's according to the Chinese government, as reported by the South China Morning Post. The move enacts even stricter time limits on gaming time for kids in a country that already limits gaming time to just an hour and a half daily.

China's biggest gaming companies, Tencent and NetEase, are imposing the restrictions directly through their respective login systems. Users are only able to log in using their real names, and all online games must be registered through China's state-run anti-addiction program.

The new rules, China's government said, are intended to curb "gaming addiction."

The World Health Organization first recognized an addictive behavior pattern  known as "gaming addiction disorder"  in 2018, and characterized someone suffering from the disorder as exhibiting, "significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning."

For years, China has instituted various rules surrounding children playing video games.

Starting  in 2019 , with the "Notice on Preventing Minors from Indulging in Online Games," China began imposing strict limits on play time and how much money could be spent in-game by people under 18. Additionally, any online game accounts were required to be tied to real-name verification tools.

The latest move further tightens those restrictions on play time to specific days.

China is the world's largest gaming market, and Tencent Games is among the world's largest game companies. It owns "League of Legends" and "Valorant" maker Riot Games and "Clash of Clans" maker Supercell, it holds an over 40% stake in "Fortnite" maker Epic Games, and it makes "Honor of Kings," which is a hugely popular game in the company's home market.

In July, Tencent  implemented a facial scan feature  into its smartphone games as part of the Chinese government's monitoring of children playing video games.

The company's stock took a slight hit on Monday, down from $59 to $57, on news of the tighter gaming restrictions.

That's according to the Chinese government, as reported by the South China Morning Post. The move enacts even stricter time limits on gaming time for kids in a country that already limits gaming time to just an hour and a half daily.

China's biggest gaming companies, Tencent and NetEase, are imposing the restrictions directly through their respective login systems. Users are only able to log in using their real names, and all online games must be registered through China's state-run anti-addiction program.

The new rules, China's government said, are intended to curb "gaming addiction."

The World Health Organization first recognized an addictive behavior pattern   known as "gaming addiction disorder"   in 2018, and characterized someone suffering from the disorder as exhibiting, "significant impairment in personal, family, social, educational, occupational or other important areas of functioning."

For years, China has instituted various rules surrounding children playing video games.

Starting   in 2019 , with the "Notice on Preventing Minors from Indulging in Online Games," China began imposing strict limits on play time and how much money could be spent in-game by people under 18. Additionally, any online game accounts were required to be tied to real-name verification tools.

The latest move further tightens those restrictions on play time to specific days.

China is the world's largest gaming market, and Tencent Games is among the world's largest game companies. It owns "League of Legends" and "Valorant" maker Riot Games and "Clash of Clans" maker Supercell, it holds an over 40% stake in "Fortnite" maker Epic Games, and it makes "Honor of Kings," which is a hugely popular game in the company's home market.

In July, Tencent   implemented a facial scan feature   into its smartphone games as part of the Chinese government's monitoring of children playing video games.

The company's stock took a slight hit on Monday, down from $59 to $57, on news of the tighter gaming restrictions.

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Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
1  seeder  Buzz of the Orient    2 months ago

This topic should make for a good discussion.  IMO China has done the right thing.  There was no such thing as a video game when I was a kid, and in fact no computers either.  The only movie I have seen where being an expert video game player was an advantage was The Last Starfighter.  Whether or not the benefit of hand-eye coordination is worth the disadvantages, is up for discussion.  I don't think so. 

 
 
 
Hallux
Sophomore Principal
1.1  Hallux  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1    2 months ago

When I was a kid, I had tools and built all of my bicycles and go-carts. Several generations later a fool invented duct tape paving the way for further numbing of young mind.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
1.1.1  seeder  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Hallux @1.1    2 months ago

When I was a kid, I used a wooden orange crate, a 2X4, a skate and a stick for a handlebar to build a scooter.

il_570xN.364835032_nf3a.jpg

 
 
 
shona1
Sophomore Participates
1.2  shona1  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1    2 months ago

Evening Buzz....hmm you would have to ask what in the hell are the parents doing?? Why on earth any government would have to step in and restrict hours is beyond me...

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
1.2.1  seeder  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  shona1 @1.2    2 months ago

The problem is everywhere.  On Canadian news I noted that there is a problem with the hours the kids are spending on it, and if you were to google it there are pages on the problem.

 
 
 
shona1
Sophomore Participates
1.2.2  shona1  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1.2.1    2 months ago

Yep it is the same here..they expect the government to do everything... about time they took responsibility for their own kids and what they do.

 
 
 
shona1
Sophomore Participates
1.2.3  shona1  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1.2.1    2 months ago

Just on the news now...35% of kids here under the age of 12 have a mobile phone... parents were asking what is the best plan for them...next it will be the government should do something!! And control it for them..

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
1.2.4  seeder  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  shona1 @1.2.3    2 months ago

I helped my doctor friend's 7 year old daughter with her English pronunciation.  She wore a wrist phone that enabled her to contact her parents - it looked like this...

Inch-Touch-Screen-Smart-Watch-Children-Wrist-Smartwatch-Bluetooth-Watch-For-IOS-Android-Phone-With-SIM.jpg

When I was a kid, the comic detective Dick Tracy had a wrist phone, and that was considered outlandish science fiction at the time.

dick-tracy-smartwatch.jpg

 
 
 
Lucifer Morningstar
Professor Guide
2  Lucifer Morningstar    2 months ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3  Kavika     2 months ago

I agree with China on this. The amount of time kids spend on internet games isn’t helping them expand their horizons.

 
 
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