Why hurricanes are doing more damage: It's us, not the storms

Via:  johnrussell  •  2 weeks ago  •  66 comments

 Why hurricanes are doing more damage: It's us, not the storms
Those moving to the coasts are living in larger houses and own more cars, but their houses are also closer together. That means more impervious surfaces - such as roads and rooftops - and less area for the floodwaters to go.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


Why hurricanes are doing more damage: It's us, not the storms

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/msn/why-hurricanes-are-doing-more-damage-it%e2%80%99s-not-the-storms-it%e2%80%99s-us/ar-BBNe1WJ

Three catastrophic hurricanes made U.S. landfall within 30 days of each other last year, causing more than $250 billion in losses.

HurricaneDamageRestorationKauai.png

By the time the winds died down and the floodwaters receded, Harvey, Irma and Maria were three of the five most destructive hurricanes in U.S. history - and 2017 was the costliest hurricane season ever.

But despite that exceptional cluster of storms, it's not that hurricanes are getting stronger or more frequent that's making them more expensive.

It's that there's more in the way for the storms to destroy.

As Hurricane Florence takes aim at the Carolinas this week, emergency management officials, meteorologists and insurance companies are looking as much at what's in its path as they are the strength of the storm itself.

"The damage trend is obviously through-the-roof up, but most of that trend is due to population growth along the coastline," said Phil Klotzbach, a meteorologist at Colorado State University. "There's just more people in harm's way, unfortunately. And not only are there more people, but we're more affluent than our parents were."

Those moving to the coasts are living in larger houses and own more cars, but their houses are also closer together. That means more impervious surfaces - such as roads and rooftops - and less area for the floodwaters to go.

So even as better construction methods have reduced the wind damage in many places - especially Florida, where Hurricane Andrew in 1992 inspired an overhaul of building codes - storm surge and flooding have taken over as the primary concern.

The frequency and intensity of hurricanes have ebbed and flowed throughout the last century, but there has been no measurable increase in either over that time, several studies have found. If anything, in fact, there has been a slight decrease.

That doesn't mean that climate change isn't having an effect. As sea levels rise, storm surges are reaching farther inland.

And one study published in July showed that tropical cyclones across the world are actually slowing down. James Kossin of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration found the average hurricane slowed about 10 percent from 1946 to 2016.

Slower hurricanes - such as Hurricane Harvey - can dump more rain on an area before moving on, adding to their destructive power.

Last year's blitz of hurricanes was all the more unusual because the East Coast had enjoyed more than a decade of relative calm. Before Hurricane Harvey hit Texas in August 2017, the last major hurricane to hit the continental United States was Wilma in 2005.

Forecasters say it's too soon to tell how destructive Hurricane Florence will be - but it has the potential to be on par with last year's historically destructive storms.

"Florence is going to pose a triple threat of impacts in terms of high winds, coastal surge and then inland flood," said Steve Bowen, a meteorologist with risk management firm Aon Benfield.

He said much will depend on when, where and how fast it hits ground.

"You like to say in sports that it's often a game of inches," Bowen said. "In this case, it's a matter of miles that can make a difference of billions of dollars."

Tags

jrDiscussion - desc
JohnRussell
1  JohnRussell    2 weeks ago

It is true that we dont often hear of hurricanes hitting unpopulated areas any more. I guess every inch of shoreline is developed, more or less. 

 
 
MUVA
1.1  MUVA  replied to  JohnRussell @1    2 weeks ago

Yep build right on the dune line.

 
 
XDm9mm
1.2  XDm9mm  replied to  JohnRussell @1    2 weeks ago

As long as we have government supported "flood insurance", we'll have morons building houses right up to the dunes.....  in some cases, they'll put the damn house on stilts because simple high tides bring water under the home.

Of course, we have a whole lot more people than we used to also....   but that's another topic for another day.

 
 
zuksam
1.2.1  zuksam  replied to  XDm9mm @1.2    2 weeks ago

I miss the way it was when I was a kid, People used to build small rough cottages or shacks that they could afford to replace. Now they're all 3 story multi-million dollar palaces.

 
 
XDm9mm
1.2.2  XDm9mm  replied to  zuksam @1.2.1    2 weeks ago

Years back, when I worked with NY Telephone (AT&T days pre-divestiture) we used to have the summer rituals all the guys volunteered for.   Getting phones to the 'bungalows' along the shore in the Rockaways.  Thousands of them.  Row after row, block after block.   Of course we also had some great times too.   Drag racing the telephone company vans on the boardwalk, occasionally having to pull one out with a construction rig after it broke through the boardwalk.   Replacing the primary cables under the boardwalk after the year round locals cut the cables out for the copper.....  It was a great job that lasted for about three or four weeks and then back to the grind of whatever garage you normally pulled out of.

 
 
WallyW
1.3  WallyW  replied to  JohnRussell @1    2 weeks ago

Yep, it's the same mental quirk that causes people to build, and then rebuild, on flood plains after they've been wiped out. The need to be close to the water leads them to do this.....

Image result for coastal houses on stilts.

 
 
Paula Bartholomew
1.3.1  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  WallyW @1.3    2 weeks ago

Here (CA) we have had devastating wild fires and people continue to rebuild in fire prone areas.  Insurance companies here will honor a first claim, but if you insisted on rebuilding in danger zones, you are on your own if you get burned out again.

 
 
lady in black
1.3.2  lady in black  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @1.3.1    2 weeks ago

And people keep rebuilding in tornado prone states.

Being from the Buffalo NY area and known for our "blizzards", I always say give me a blizzard any day over a hurricane, tornado, earth quake.  

 
 
XDm9mm
1.3.3  XDm9mm  replied to  lady in black @1.3.2    2 weeks ago

Contrary to popular belief, tornadoes happen in virtually all states.   Granted, some states get more than others, but they happen all over.

And you can prepare for virtually all of those problems with the exception of the earthquake.  Hell, it an earthquake doesn't even need to be local to cause damage.  The home my son owns in Loudoun County got damaged when a small 4.x(?) hit VA down in the Richmond area.  Not a great deal of damage, but enough to create some problems for him.

 
 
Paula Bartholomew
1.3.4  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  lady in black @1.3.2    2 weeks ago

The only blizzards here are at DQ. winking

 
 
XDm9mm
1.3.5  XDm9mm  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @1.3.4    2 weeks ago

The M&M ones are best!!

 
 
Colour Me Free
1.3.6  Colour Me Free  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @1.3.4    2 weeks ago

: )

 
 
Paula Bartholomew
1.3.7  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  XDm9mm @1.3.5    2 weeks ago

Now that is one thing we agree on.

 
 
cjcold
1.4  cjcold  replied to  JohnRussell @1    2 weeks ago

And all of NASA and NOAA satellites, aircraft, ships at sea and boots on the ground work towards accuracy. 

 
 
Colour Me Free
2  Colour Me Free    2 weeks ago

Interesting reading thanks for seeding it .. makes sense to me .. yet one thing not mentioned regarding less area for the floodwater to go - is the filling in of and building on natural wet lands for those bigger houses.  No one lived there before because of swamps, ponds, marsh areas ect ..

 
 
JohnRussell
2.1  JohnRussell  replied to  Colour Me Free @2    2 weeks ago

Human nature being what it is, you always assume the big storm is going to hit somewhere else, and of course, it usually does. 

 
 
Colour Me Free
2.1.1  Colour Me Free  replied to  JohnRussell @2.1    2 weeks ago

Good point..

 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
3  Perrie Halpern R.A.    2 weeks ago

We were powerless from Sandy for 11 days, but that was nothing to my friends who lived on the canals of the south shore. The homes all lost their bottom floors ( and remember we build with basements, too). But we never had a storm surge that entered the tunnels of NYC and flooded the whole Wall Street area. That was one nasty hurricane! 

 
 
lady in black
3.1  lady in black  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3    2 weeks ago

I can't imagine living in a house without a basement.

 
 
Trout Giggles
3.1.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  lady in black @3.1    2 weeks ago

Here in Arkansas and much of the southeast, the water table is very close to the surface so houses don't come with basements

 
 
lady in black
3.1.2  lady in black  replied to  Trout Giggles @3.1.1    2 weeks ago

Basement pics

getPart?uid=30117968&partId=2&scope=STAN

getPart?uid=30117970&partId=2&scope=STAN

getPart?uid=30117969&partId=2&scope=STAN

getPart?uid=30117971&partId=2&scope=STAN

getPart?uid=30117967&partId=2&scope=STAN

Image may contain: living room, table and indoor

 
 
Paula Bartholomew
3.1.3  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  lady in black @3.1    2 weeks ago

I would love to have a basement.  I would turn it into guest quarters and it would also be a place to just relax.

 
 
cjcold
3.1.4  cjcold  replied to  Trout Giggles @3.1.1    2 weeks ago

Here in the land of Oz we dig basements and storm shelters due to the twisters.

 
 
Trout Giggles
3.1.5  Trout Giggles  replied to  lady in black @3.1.2    one week ago

That is very nice. A good place to have a glass of wine and read a book

 
 
Trout Giggles
3.1.6  Trout Giggles  replied to  cjcold @3.1.4    one week ago

People here buy storm shelters. My daughter's in-laws put one under their garage in case of tornadoes. That means they have to move their car out of the way when a twister is bearing down on them. I prefer a hallway or a bathtub.

 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
3.1.7  Galen Marvin Ross  replied to  lady in black @3.1    one week ago

Don't move to Florida, no basements because of the water table.

 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
3.1.8  Galen Marvin Ross  replied to  Trout Giggles @3.1.6    one week ago

Storm shelters are good, if you have a tornado but, in a hurricane it can be a death trap, most are underground so, if you have flooding you end up in a box full of water, in a hurricane like this one you will have flooding.

 
 
lady in black
3.1.9  lady in black  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @3.1.7    one week ago

I have no desire to ever move to Florida, too hot, I love have 4 seasons.

 
 
Trout Giggles
3.1.10  Trout Giggles  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @3.1.8    one week ago

We don't worry much about hurricanes but on occasion we get a tropical depression up from the Gulf and that can cause flooding.

 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
3.1.11  Galen Marvin Ross  replied to  lady in black @3.1.9    one week ago
I have no desire to ever move to Florida, too hot, I love have 4 seasons.

I gotta agree lady, I lived in Florida most of my childhood and, when I learned that there were actually four real seasons, well, I had to have them.

 
 
cjcold
3.1.12  cjcold  replied to  Trout Giggles @3.1.6    one week ago

Many storm shelters around here started out as fallout shelters.

Recently met a guy who lives in an old nuclear missile silo.

Lived around here most of my life and didn't even know it existed.

 
 
XDm9mm
3.2  XDm9mm  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3    2 weeks ago

That was a bunch of things all coming together in perfect unison.   

A hurricane coming in and the "high point" of the 'surge' just happened to be at the mouth of the Hudson River plus high tide all at the same time.

I remember going through Donna and Camille when I was a kid.   We had water up to my thigh in our back yard (Bellerose, Queens side) during Donna and having a tree downed plus some minor flooding during Cammile.

 
 
Eagle Averro
4  Eagle Averro    2 weeks ago

The frequency and intensity of hurricanes have ebbed and flowed throughout the last century, but there has been no measurable increase in either over that time, several studies have found. If anything, in fact, there has been a slight decrease.

That doesn't mean that climate change isn't having an effect. As sea levels rise, storm surges are reaching farther inland.

E.A Seems that More some read, the less they comprehend!

 Read on " Conveyor changes " read what I posted Months ago about " Algorithms " and how they are no longer Viable because of the " Colder Nights and Hotter Days "

See what was the Original " Track " for Florence, and how much it has changed and it is YET to change, with the possibility that the LOW on the West will Join up!

  But … But … But !!!   SO much for " Speak your Mind " and NT!!  Right!

 
 
Eagle Averro
4.1  Eagle Averro  replied to  Eagle Averro @4    one week ago

Update::

Notice Jacksonville, Tallahassee Are almost the meeting point of the two storm systems, The Highs on either side and the Lows in the Middle mean that they both have one way to go, and that is?

All those in the storms " Line of Fire " take care and Godbless, for NO man/Woman can do anything but as the " evolutionists " would say Hope that Something comes from Nothing!

noaad3.gif?1536969216

 
 
cjcold
4.2  cjcold  replied to  Eagle Averro @4    one week ago

Pretty sure it is warmer nights.

 
 
charger 383
5  charger 383    2 weeks ago

Again, I say overpopulation is our biggest problem

 
 
cjcold
5.1  cjcold  replied to  charger 383 @5    one week ago

Couldn't agree more.

 
 
Paula Bartholomew
6  Paula Bartholomew    2 weeks ago

If I lived in an area prone to these hurricanes, I would have Atlas Movers on speed dial.  It would not take long at all to load up as much as possible and get the hell out of Dodge.

 
 
cjcold
6.1  cjcold  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @6    one week ago

I've lived in the land of Oz most of my life and have never seen a tornado.

 
 
Kathleen/Butterfie
7  Kathleen/Butterfie    2 weeks ago

If guess I better lock  my hurricane article I made earlier, why have two?

 
 
JohnRussell
7.1  JohnRussell  replied to  Kathleen/Butterfie @7    2 weeks ago

I believe this is a different topic Kathleen, I did not mean to usurp any comments from you. 

 
 
Kathleen/Butterfie
7.1.1  Kathleen/Butterfie  replied to  JohnRussell @7.1    one week ago

It is, I think there was another one that I meant instead of this one. Sorry.

 
 
badfish hαηd ⊕ƒ †hε Ωuεεη
8  badfish hαηd ⊕ƒ †hε Ωuεεη    one week ago

Hurricanes aren't stronger, it really is infrastructure that makes these weaker storms seem stronger.

In the 1600s its documented that two major Hurricanes hit Massachusetts. Until last year it's been 12 years since a major hurricane hit the Us.

Hurricanes are getting weaker and less frequent. They use to hit our entire east coast. Can you imagine Hurricanes as far north as Boston?

The bogus climate change industry is dominated but psuedo science and experts who aren't scientists.

One of the problems is we rely on government studies conducted to support the conclusions these frauds already choose to accept. The science is far from settled.

Eisenhower in his departing speech warned us about partisan government psuedo science.

 
 
cjcold
8.1  cjcold  replied to  badfish hαηd ⊕ƒ †hε Ωuεεη @8    one week ago

Sorry Bad, that denier nonsense of yours flies in the face of all scientific evidence.

 
 
Eagle Averro
8.1.1  Eagle Averro  replied to  cjcold @8.1    one week ago
all scientific evidence.

E.A Like why adding a #5?

 
 
badfish hαηd ⊕ƒ †hε Ωuεεη
8.1.2  badfish hαηd ⊕ƒ †hε Ωuεεη  replied to  cjcold @8.1    one week ago

The hurricane hysteria is not supported by data, you will need to do more than make an allegation like that.

 
 
cjcold
8.1.3  cjcold  replied to  badfish hαηd ⊕ƒ †hε Ωuεεη @8.1.2    6 days ago

I'd suggest going to the NOAA site to see what they have to say but I know you won't.

 
 
Eagle Averro
9  Eagle Averro    one week ago

Update 2::

https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/text/refresh/MIATCPAT1+shtml/151752.shtml?

PRESENT MOVEMENT...W OR 270 DEGREES AT 3 MPH...6 KM/H

A preliminary report from a cooperative observer near Swansboro,
North Carolina, indicates that more than 30 inches of rain has
fallen so far. That rainfall total breaks the tropical cyclone
rainfall record of 24.06 inches for North Carolina set during
Hurricane Floyd in 1999.

WIND:  Tropical storm conditions will continue today in portions of
the warning area along the coast and also over large portions of
eastern North Carolina and extreme eastern South Carolina, with
tropical-storm-force wind gusts spreading well inland.

TORNADOES:  A few tornadoes are possible in southeastern North
Carolina northeastern South Carolina today through tonight.

SURF:  Swells generated by Florence are affecting Bermuda, portions
of the U.S. East Coast, and the northwestern and central Bahamas.
These swells are likely to cause life-threatening surf and rip
current conditions.  Please consult products from your local weather
office.


NEXT ADVISORY
-------------
Next complete advisory at 500 PM EDT.

$$
Forecaster Stewart

 
 
Eagle Averro
10  Eagle Averro    one week ago

The Auto update of::

4.1  Eagle Averro  replied to  Eagle Averro @4    2 days ago

Shows exactly what I stated about the " Weather Pattern " So the Effective " Zone " of Florence now extends to  Alexandrea and New Iberia.

 And all the way East to Canada! Rain is Making New Records, and it has a while to go!

 
 
Eagle Averro
10.1  Eagle Averro  replied to  Eagle Averro @10    one week ago

noaad1.gif?1537182072

 
 
Eagle Averro
11  Eagle Averro    5 days ago
20CLI-PAGLAGOON2-jumbo.jpg?quality=90&au
A livestock farm in eastern North Carolina photographed by Waterkeeper Alliance on Monday.
CreditRick Dove/Waterkeeper Alliance

Excess nitrates in groundwater, such as those associated with pig manure, are linked with health problems like blue baby syndrome. In some cases of the syndrome, nitrogen binds to the hemoglobin in a baby’s blood and makes red blood cells unable to carry oxygen. The syndrome’s name comes from the fact that the lack of oxygen causes the baby’s skin to take on a bluish tint. The syndrome can also be caused by heart defects.

Part of the problem, said Alexis Andiman, an associate attorney with the environmental nonprofit law firm Earthjustice, is that storm standards for pig lagoons currently date from the 1960s.

 
 
Eagle Averro
12  Eagle Averro    5 days ago
hurricane-florence-environmental-hazards

Florence Floodwaters Breach Coal Ash Pond and Imperil Other Toxic Sites

 
 
Eagle Averro
13  Eagle Averro    5 days ago

What ever happened to the Nuclear Plant and how much power was it producing during the Crises, and how " Green was/is it "?

 
 
Eagle Averro
13.1  Eagle Averro  replied to  Eagle Averro @13    3 days ago
What ever happened to the Nuclear Plant and how much power was it producing during the Crises, and how " Green was/is it "?

E.A ..::

Florence’s Floodwaters Breach Defenses at Power Plant, Prompting Shutdown

  • Duke Energy shut down a power plant in Wilmington, N.C., on Friday after a dam at the site breached, potentially spilling coal ash into the nearby Cape Fear River.
  • The Environmental Protection Agency links the substances in coal ash to nervous-system problems, reproductive issues and cancer.
24m ago
22CLI-COALASH2-threeByTwoSmallAt2X.jpg?q
Water from the swollen Cape Fear River spilled over an earthen dike Thursday at the L.V. Sutton power plant. Duke Energy, via Associated Press
 
 
Eagle Averro
13.2  Eagle Averro  replied to  Eagle Averro @13    3 days ago
What ever happened to the Nuclear Plant and how much power was it producing during the Crises, and how " Green was/is it "?

E.A ::

Florence Flooding Limits Road Access to Duke Nuclear Plant

By Reuters

  • Sept. 17, 2018

(Reuters) - Duke Energy Corp said on Monday that its Brunswick nuclear power plant in North Carolina remained safely shut down despite limited road access to the site due to flooding from storm Florence.

The remnants of Florence, which came ashore as a hurricane on Friday, are still dropping heavy amounts of rain on the already waterlogged Carolinas, with officials warning the worst is yet to come as swollen rivers pose a growing threat.

Duke spokeswoman Mary Kathryn Green said there was road access to the Brunswick site but it was "limited access." She said there were about 300 people at the plant. There are usually more than 900 workers.

Over the weekend, Duke said that on-site conditions had prohibited the plant staff "from accessing the site via personal vehicles due to flooding of local roads," according to an unusual event report made available on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's website on Monday.

 
 
Eagle Averro
14  Eagle Averro    4 days ago

merlin_144013299_f9b29b88-2b1a-4321-ab60

Submerged by Florence, North Carolina’s Rural Towns Fight for Attention

Out of sight of the national spotlight on the devastation of Hurricane Florence, many small towns worry about being washed away unnoticed.

U.S.48m ago
 
 
Eagle Averro
15  Eagle Averro    4 days ago

merlin_144013152_a59c9f55-5256-41ce-bb66Ms. Brown boating through Ivanhoe, a town at the confluence of the Black and South Rivers.
Credit
Ilana Panich-Linsman for The New York Times

 
 
Eagle Averro
16  Eagle Averro    4 days ago

"  

The evacuees at the gym said they were anxious to get back. They said they loved Ivanhoe and the way people there helped one another. Charles Lee, 62, half joked that if he helped one neighbor replace their drywall, others would notice and he would soon be doing the entire town’s.

Returning carries some dread. Elvira Malinek spent days digging channels to try to drain water from her house before she finally gave up and hailed a helicopter. She does not expect to be home for another week and does not know what she will find.

“The disaster just really starts for us now,” she said.    "

 
 
Eagle Averro
17  Eagle Averro    3 days ago

Millions of Carolina Homes Are at Risk of Flooding. Only 335,000 Have Flood Insurance.

Here’s why the federal flood insurance program won’t pick up the slack.

Imagemerlin_143957820_dadf2edb-72aa-496f-b2b0
Floodwaters inundated Lumberton, N.C., on Tuesday after Hurricane Florence. The town is some 70 miles from the coast.CreditCreditJohnny Milano for The New York Times
 
 
Eagle Averro
18  Eagle Averro    3 days ago

Flooding in North Carolina, as Seen From a Drone By Niko Koppel and Bedel Saget

 
 
Eagle Averro
19  Eagle Averro    2 days ago

merlin_143980911_1b32b350-ec3a-4873-95d5When the helicopter landed in her neighborhood of Rocky Point, N.C., Amanda Parrish, due to give birth in three weeks, left with her fiancé, Dominique Lesine, and their son, Braylon.

 
 
Eagle Averro
20  Eagle Averro    2 days ago

noaad1.gif?1537613546

 
 
Eagle Averro
21  Eagle Averro    4 hours ago

So How does that Joined Storm Front look so far?

 
 
Eagle Averro
22  Eagle Averro    4 hours ago
CLX_loop.gif
 
 
Eagle Averro
23  Eagle Averro    4 hours ago

LWX_loop.gif

 
 
Loading...
Loading...

Who is online

ArkansasHermit-too
Ozzwald
arkpdx
Tacos!
dave-2693993
Dismayed Patriot
WallyW
Skrekk
livefreeordie
Galen Marvin Ross

XDm9mm
Texan1211
GaJenn78
Tessylo


58 visitors