Why the Bay of Pigs Invasion Went So Wrong

  
Via:  kavika  •  2 months ago  •  29 comments

Why the Bay of Pigs Invasion Went So Wrong

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


Before the break of dawn on April 15, 1961, a squadron of eight B-26 bombers piloted by Cuban exiles roared down a Nicaraguan airstrip on a secret mission. The U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and President John F. Kennedy hoped the Bay of Pigs Invasion would result in the overthrow of Cuban leader Fidel Castro. But the operation that unfolded over the next five days became one of the greatest military fiascoes in American history.

President Dwight D. Eisenhower had first sanctioned the covert CIA operation in 1959 to topple Castro, who had nationalized American industries and strengthened ties with the Soviet Union after leading a revolution that ousted the pro-American military dictator Fulgencio Batista


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Kavika
1  seeder  Kavika     2 months ago

FUBAR

 
 
 
Raven Wing
1.1  Raven Wing  replied to  Kavika @1    2 months ago

My ex-husband was on a Destroyer Escort during the Bay of Pigs. His ship was supposed to come back to port after a two weeks training at sea, but, when I went to pick him up I was told the ship was not in port. That is all anyone would tell me, or any of the other wives there to pick up their husbands. 

It wasn't until after the ship returned to port several weeks later that we found out where the ship had been during that time. While we had somewhat of an idea that it was some sort of secret mission, we had no idea it was to the Bay of Pigs action. 

 
 
 
Kavika
1.1.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Raven Wing @1.1    2 months ago

That must have been an stressful time for the wives and kids of the sailors, RW.

 
 
 
MUVA
1.1.2  MUVA  replied to  Kavika @1.1.1    2 months ago

My father was stationed in GITMO in the 60's he ran a repeating station he was a cryptologist for a good part of his Naval career.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
1.1.3  Raven Wing  replied to  Kavika @1.1.1    2 months ago
That must have been an stressful time for the wives and kids of the sailors, RW

It really was, Kavika. During that time fear of Atomic war was a very real possibility, and having a part of our Naval forces seemingly disappear was indeed a very scary and stressful time. All we could do was wait and pray for their safety.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
2  Vic Eldred    2 months ago

Where is the "Why" in this seed?

Maybe I can provide the answer - because the CIA plan was using a tiny contingent of Cuban freedom fighters, while attempting to conceal US support and most egregious was the assumption that the Cuban people would be able to rise up and aid the invasion and overthrow a firmly entrenched military dictatorship. 

What was needed to win was what President Reagan would later do in Grenada:

"The U.S. Army's Rapid Deployment Force (1st, 2nd Ranger Battalions and 82nd Airborne Division Paratroopers), U.S. Marines, U.S. Army Delta Force and U.S. Navy SEALs and other combined forces comprised the 7,600 troops from the United States, Jamaica, and members of the Regional Security System (RSS)[4] defeated Grenadian resistance after a low-altitude airborne assault by the 75th Rangers on Point Salines Airport on the southern end of the island while a Marine helicopter and amphibious landing occurred on the northern end at Pearl's Airfield shortly afterward. The military government of Hudson Austin was deposed and replaced by a government appointed by Governor-General Paul Scoon until elections were held in 1984."


"The date of the invasion is now a national holiday in Grenada, called Thanksgiving Day, and the Point Salines International Airport was renamed in honor of Prime Minister Maurice Bishop."

https://military.wikia.org/wiki/Invasion_of_Grenada



 
 
 
Kavika
2.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Vic Eldred @2    2 months ago
Where is the "Why" in this seed?

There is no ''Why'' in the seed because the point of the article explains what and why things went wrong in this invasion. Of course after this failed attempt by the US the relationship between Cuba and Russian got much stronger..(Cuba missile crisis).

Why is a good question to ask when trying to explain why Castro came to power. The US supported a corrupt  brutal military dictator and didn't see, or didn't want to see, that this would lead to a revolution. When it did the US withdrew support from Bastista and he fled to Spain to live out his life in splendor. It's also worthwhile to research the Mafia involvement in Cuba.

A very complex situation in it's time in history. 

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
2.1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Kavika @2.1    2 months ago
"...the Mafia involvement in Cuba."

The "Godfather, Part 2" gives a bit of a picture of that.

 
 
 
Kavika
2.1.2  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Buzz of the Orient @2.1.1    2 months ago

Yes it does. Meyer Lansky spend some time in Cuba, in fact a lot of time as the ''accountant''...

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
3  Vic Eldred    2 months ago

The US supported a corrupt  brutal military dictator and didn't see, or didn't want to see, that this would lead to a revolution. When it did the US withdrew support from Bastista and he fled to Spain to live out his life in splendor. It's also worthwhile to research the Mafia involvement in Cuba.

There wasn't just Mafia operating in partnership with the Cuban government, major US corporations had a great relationship with the dictator Fulgencio Batista. Cuba back then was another adult playground with Gambling Casino's and Brothels. So ya, Cuba wasn't a democracy. Then came the revolution and a FAR WORSE DICTATOR. One quarter of the Cuban population fled (mostly those who owned a piece of land or just about anything). When people vote with their feet it's a lot stronger than a vote at the ballot box.

A very complex situation in it's time in history. 

Yup, how many in our government were sympathetic to Castro?

"But Earl Smith, the ambassador, never got over what he saw as CIA officers' excessive sympathy for the Cuban revolution. In his 1962 memoir, Smith wrote, "There is no advantage to the United States in sending an Ambassador to a country if the CIA representatives there act on their own and take an opposite position."

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=98921086


As for the CIA director:

"Eisenhower is told by Allen Dulles, the CIA director, and others that the rebels are moving very fast from the eastern part of the island to the central part, and Eisenhower says, 'Well why wasn't I told this before?' " 

If you want to see a picture of Allen Dulles, that's him on my avatar.

 
 
 
Kavika
3.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Vic Eldred @3    2 months ago
There wasn't just Mafia operating in partnership with the Cuban government, major US corporations had a great relationship with the dictator Fulgencio Batista.

Ahh, US corporations and the military...Shades of Central and South America and throw in Haiti. General Smedley Butler said it best.

I served in all commissioned ranks from second lieutenant to Major General. And during that period I spent most of my time being a high-class muscle man for Big Business, for Wall Street and for the bankers. In short, I was a racketeer for capitalism. I suspected I was just part of the racket all the time. Now I am sure of it.
  • Received 16 military medals, 5 for valor. Is one of 19 men to receive the Medal of Honor twice.
  • Wrote the 1935 exposé that linked business and the military titled "War Is A Racket." 
"But Earl Smith, the ambassador, never got over what he saw as CIA officers' excessive sympathy for the Cuban revolution. In his 1962 memoir, Smith wrote, "There is no advantage to the United States in sending an Ambassador to a country if the CIA representatives there act on their own and take an opposite position."

Oh yes, the CIA and their support of dictators and also their take down of legitimate elected governments. It came back to bite us in the ass more than once. 

If you want to see a picture of Allen Dulles, that's him on my avatar.

Yes, I recognize the photo. 

 
 
 
dave-2693993
4  dave-2693993    2 months ago

I know many will doubt this, but Carl of the 101st was dead positive about it. There was no question in his mind. This was NOT the Cuban Missile Crisis.

He and others from the 101st were loaded up in C119s to fly in circles for a while and were prepared to be dropped in to Cuba during Bay of Pigs.

His C119 lost an engine and had to continue circling for a good long time with the plane flying at an angle and shaking the previous meal out of it's passengers.

Eventually everybody was ordered to return to base.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
4.1  Vic Eldred  replied to  dave-2693993 @4    2 months ago

I don't doubt it for a minute. JFK was afraid anybody would find out the US was behind it. That sounds right!

 
 
 
Kavika
4.2  seeder  Kavika   replied to  dave-2693993 @4    2 months ago
I know many will doubt this, but Carl of the 101st was dead positive about it. There was no question in his mind. This was NOT the Cuban Missile Crisis.

No doubt dave. At that time I was also with the 101st. We were in a different part of the world doing stupid shit. 

 
 
 
dave-2693993
4.2.1  dave-2693993  replied to  Kavika @4.2    2 months ago
We were in a different part of the world doing stupid shit. 

Hill 937.

 
 
 
Kavika
4.2.2  seeder  Kavika   replied to  dave-2693993 @4.2.1    2 months ago
Hill 937.

Yeah, Hamburger Hill was bad, Hill 875 Dak to was even worse. 

 
 
 
dave-2693993
4.2.3  dave-2693993  replied to  Kavika @4.2.2    2 months ago
Hill 875 Dak

Terrible loss of life and quality of life.

Did they keep the hill? Or, did they also, walk away from it?

 
 
 
Kavika
4.2.4  seeder  Kavika   replied to  dave-2693993 @4.2.3    2 months ago

When the hill was finally taken it was discovered that the NVA had left. It became a moot point.

The fighting was a very close quarters and the casualties were extreme. So extreme in fact that when the battle was over the 173rd Airborne was declared combat ineffective and was pulled out of the line to regroup and receive reinforcements. 

 
 
 
dave-2693993
4.2.5  dave-2693993  replied to  Kavika @4.2.4    2 months ago

Sorry for that.

Was this before or after you were transferred to the 173rd?

 
 
 
Kavika
4.2.6  seeder  Kavika   replied to  dave-2693993 @4.2.5    2 months ago

Dak To was 1967. I left Vietnam in 1965.

 
 
 
dave-2693993
4.2.7  dave-2693993  replied to  Kavika @4.2.6    2 months ago

Alright.

Glad you missed it.

Thoughts for those who didn't.

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
5  Ed-NavDoc    2 months ago

Flawed intelligence, CIA arrogance, bad planning, and woefully insufficient material resources. That is just to name a few.

 
 
 
Kavika
5.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Ed-NavDoc @5    2 months ago

That's a good start Doc. 

I need to find this article again but Batista had the chance to kill Castro when their revolution was just starting in 1958 I believe. He let him take to the mountains using this excuse as a way to get more money to fight the commies all the time pocketing millions of dollars. His wealth, when he fled to Spain, was estimated to be in the neighborhood of $300 million. 

 
 
 
Ender
6  Ender    2 months ago

It seems every conflict we have been in since WW11 has been a screw up.

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
6.1  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Ender @6    2 months ago

U.S. military history is just not your forte is it? What problems there were was a result of political interference and mismanagement, not the fault of the military in general.

 
 
 
Ender
6.1.1  Ender  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @6.1    2 months ago

Never once blamed the military itself.     [delete]

 
 
 
Kavika
6.1.2  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Ender @6.1.1    2 months ago

OK guys, let's not go there. IMO Ender pointed that every conflict we've gotten into after WWII as a country (not the military) has been a screw up....It's the military that suffers from the mistakes the politicians make and they have made a huge number of them. 

So there ya go guys. 

BTW, I did not flag any comments. 

 
 
 
Ender
6.1.3  Ender  replied to  Kavika @6.1.2    2 months ago
I did not flag any comments

I never do.

I will amend my statement a little. I still think most of our intervention has been a screw up, from our undeclared wars to selling arms to factions.

My amendment is, even though our conflicts/wars (since WW11) have been messed up, places like South Korea (imo) are a lot better off that what they could have been.

Sorry though. Didn't mean to derail your seed.

 
 
 
Kavika
6.1.4  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Ender @6.1.3    2 months ago
Sorry though. Didn't mean to derail your seed.

You didn't. I appreciate both yours and Doc comments. Just some clarification was needed.  

If any of the wars/conflicts after WWII were justified it would be Korea...

 
 
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