Language Expert: Donald Trump's Way Of Speaking Is 'Oddly Adolescent'

  
By:  john-russell  •  4 weeks ago  •  48 comments

Language Expert: Donald Trump's Way Of Speaking Is 'Oddly Adolescent'

One of the most interesting things about this video is that it is close to 2 years old and yet it could have been made yesterday. Thats how accurately it describes the way Trump talks. 

Tags

jrDiscussion - desc
Find text within the comments Find 
 
JohnRussell
1  author  JohnRussell    4 weeks ago

So according to the linguistics professor, Trump has the verbal skills of primitive man. 

 
 
 
Greg Jones
1.1  Greg Jones  replied to  JohnRussell @1    4 weeks ago

And....he was a weak and wimpy speaking voice. That's why I don't sit and listen to his speeches or pay much attention to his tweets. Not sure why some many Trump haters hang on his every word. Must be some sort of mental condition.

However, his eloquence is not why I voted for him and will again. I simply cannot, with a clear conscience, ever vote for a Democrat, who collectively, are trying to turn the US into a third world country, with an agenda that stands for nothing that is decent and good.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1    4 weeks ago

I doubt youhave much of a clue about what the Democratic agenda is. 

 
 
 
PJ
1.1.2  PJ  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.1    4 weeks ago
I doubt you have much of a clue about what the Democratic agenda is. 

That's because the agenda has a lot of words in it......bigly words.   jrSmiley_68_smiley_image.png

 
 
 
epistte
1.1.3  epistte  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1    4 weeks ago
However, his eloquence is not why I voted for him and will again. I simply cannot, with a clear conscience, ever vote for a Democrat, who collectively, are trying to turn the US into a third world country, with an agenda that stands for nothing that is decent and good.

Why is it that the most liberal states have a higher quality of life, unlike the conservative states have poverty, homelessness, pollution, and addiction.

Washington was tops for quality of living. New Hampshire, which came in second place, ranked the best in terms of overall opportunity, which factors economic opportunity, equality, affordability, crime and corrections. The remaining top five states — Minnesota, Utah and Vermont — all followed suit by ranking in the top 10 in at least half of the eight categories.
 
 
 
Vic Eldred
1.2  Vic Eldred  replied to  JohnRussell @1    4 weeks ago

This is really concerning if you believe the better the speaker, the better the job performance.  Is William F Buckley still alive?  Anyone?

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.2.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2    4 weeks ago

Whether nor not Trump has had a good job performance is strictly in the eye of the beholder. Over half of the American people have disapproved of his performance as president every single week, without exception, that he has been in office. 

We can all agree agree though, that he speaks and behaves like a buffoon, which is embarrassing to our nation. 

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
1.2.2  Vic Eldred  replied to  JohnRussell @1.2.1    4 weeks ago
Whether nor not Trump has had a good job performance is strictly in the eye of the beholder.

You mean there are people who don't like the economy etc?  Well I suppose they will have to bear it, like the other half did for 8 years of radical control of the nation. The problem for the Trump haters is that so many of their votes get wasted out in California. It's over kill out there.

We can all agree agree though, that he speaks and behaves like a buffoon, which is embarrassing to our nation.

I think he talks like the common man, which is kind of refreshing after decades of pompous professional degenerates talking down to us.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.2.3  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.2    4 weeks ago
I think he talks like the common man, which is kind of refreshing after decades of pompous professional degenerates talking down to us.

He's a fricking moron. 

I would put Trump's ability to effectively present and argue a point down in about the lowest 20 percent of people I have known and talked to. 

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
1.2.4  Vic Eldred  replied to  JohnRussell @1.2.3    4 weeks ago
He's a fricking moron. 

You say that 20 times a day. It means nothing.

I would put Trump's ability to effectively present and argue a point down in about the lowest 20 percent of people I have known and talked to. 

Well John, evidently none of those people had enough brains or balls to get themselves elected President. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.2.5  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.4    4 weeks ago

Did it take a lot of brains to say "she's bleeding from ..."everywhere" alluding to a reporters time of the month? 

If that took brains God help us all. 

What means nothing is you praising this clown every day. 

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
1.2.6  Vic Eldred  replied to  JohnRussell @1.2.5    4 weeks ago
"she's bleeding from ..."everywhere" alluding to a reporters time of the month? 

Are you sure that wasn't a reference to Megyn Kelly, then a Fox News host who opened a primary debate by asking candidate Trump "if calling women “fat pigs, dogs, slobs, and disgusting animals” is behavior befitting a president?" That's a lot to dump on a candidate and it came from Fox News. The following day Trump responded with the comments, which you held on to.

Three things I need from you:

1) was Kelly's question appropriate

and

2) Prove to us here and now that Trump was referring to her "time of the month", rather than "she smelled the kill" or "went for the jugular", which are also legitimate interpretations?

3) Based on how this President has performed, how does that equate to how he talks?

Please think about what he has accomplished.


 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.2.7  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.6    4 weeks ago

So you think that isf a reporter asks a candidate if calling women names is befitting for a president, he is justified in making inappropriate and belittling references to the reporter?  Your willingness to forgive everything trump does or says is a little disturbing. When he shoots someone in the middle of Times Square you might be the one there leading the cheers from the sidewalk. 

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
1.2.8  Vic Eldred  replied to  JohnRussell @1.2.7    4 weeks ago

Your'e avoiding my questions speaks volumes. Yep, I'll defend this President. You had no objections when Obama tore this country apart and weaponized every agency of government, but when it comes to Trump I hear nothing but a non stop smearing. The people heard all of that and they voted for Trump and he will be re-elected. Trump has weathered every storm!

It's about the will of the people.

 
 
 
PJ
1.2.9  PJ  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.2    4 weeks ago
I think he talks like the common man, which is kind of refreshing after decades of pompous professional degenerates talking down to us.

Seriously?  hahahahaha

I will NEVER apologize for trying to improve myself and expanding my knowledge.  [deleted]

You "common" folk bitch and moan about people thinking they are better than you and fuss and cry because you don't have what others have but you don't want to improve yourself.  You settle for donald trump to represent who you are?  [deleted] stop bitching and crying and demanding what people are going to do for you and start doing for yourself. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.2.10  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.8    4 weeks ago
Your'e avoiding my questions speaks volumes.

Your question was lame ass.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.2.11  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.6    4 weeks ago
Hours later, the leader of the annual Red State Gathering in Atlanta announced on Twitter that Mr Trump was no longer welcome at the weekend event — and Miss Kelly was asked to join the conference in his place.

"I have rescinded my invitation to Mr Trump. While I have tried to give him great latitude, his remark about Megyn Kelly was a bridge too far," said Erick Erickson, the organiser.

"His comment was inappropriate. It is unfortunate to have to disinvite him. But I just don’t want someone on stage who gets a hostile question from a lady and his first inclination is to imply it was hormonal. It just was wrong.”

Later on Friday night, Mr Erickson told the Daily News he made the decision out of “common decency.”

"I mean, come on, you’re going to accuse Megyn Kelly of having her period and that’s why she asked the tough questions ... I just think that’s crap."

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/us-election/11791693/Donald-Trump-says-Megyn-Kellys-tough-questioning-was-due-to-menstruation.html
 
 
 
Vic Eldred
1.2.12  Vic Eldred  replied to  JohnRussell @1.2.11    4 weeks ago

NOT INTERESTED

 
 
 
Split Personality
1.2.13  Split Personality  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.8    4 weeks ago
You had no objections when Obama tore this country apart and weaponized every agency of government, but when it comes to Trump I hear nothing but a non stop smearing.

Congratulations.

Three very questionable opinions in one cohesive sentence.

 
 
 
epistte
1.2.14  epistte  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.2    4 weeks ago
I think he talks like the common man, which is kind of refreshing after decades of pompous professional degenerates talking down to us.

Who were these pompous professional degenerates?

Please give 4 examples of them talking down to you.

 
 
 
epistte
1.2.15  epistte  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.8    4 weeks ago
You had no objections when Obama tore this country apart and weaponized every agency of government,

How did Obama tear the country apart? I remember a lot of people being upset that Obama was an educated and articulate black man and was the POTUS but that reaction of the part of conservatives was not Obama's fault. Is the POTUS required to by a conservative white male that talks and thinks like you do?

How and when did he weaponize each agency of the government?  Please give 5 examples of this weaponization by Barack Obama.

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
1.2.16  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  JohnRussell @1.2.3    4 weeks ago
He's a fricking moron.

Forgive the cliché, but that's insulting to morons.

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
1.2.17  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.8    4 weeks ago
It's about the will of the people.

Morons of a feather...

 
 
 
Raven Wing
1.2.18  Raven Wing  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @1.2.17    4 weeks ago
Morons of a feather...

....together like Gorilla glue. 

 
 
 
katrix
1.2.19  katrix  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.2    4 weeks ago
I think he talks like the common man, which is kind of refreshing after decades of pompous professional degenerates talking down to us.

I think that's an insult to the common man.  I work with educated professionals, but I live in a rural area where my friends are all over the map. And not one of them sounds as stupid and buffoonish as Trump, no matter how uneducated or "common" they may be. OK, the trailer trash down the road from me might - but that's just because they're plastered every waking moment.

 
 
 
Tessylo
1.2.20  Tessylo  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.2    4 weeks ago

When I think of common in regards to this 'president' I think of the not very often used definition - of low class/from a low social class - which is exactly how the turd comports himself

 
 
 
Tessylo
1.2.21  Tessylo  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.2.6    4 weeks ago

I just love your rumpsplanations.

We all know what the moron meant.

What has he accomplished?

Got any mustard for that pretzel?

 
 
 
XDm9mm
2  XDm9mm    4 weeks ago
One of the most interesting things about this video is that it is close to 2 years old and yet it could have been made yesterday. Thats how accurately it describes the way Trump talks. 

One of the most interesting things about this seed is that it could have been made two years ago and the vitriolic diatribes against President Trump are virtually identical.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
2.1  Ozzwald  replied to  XDm9mm @2    4 weeks ago
One of the most interesting things about this seed is that it could have been made two years ago and the vitriolic diatribes against President Trump are virtually identical.

That's because he talks the same way as he did 2 years ago.  Chaotic and childlike.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
2.2  author  JohnRussell  replied to  XDm9mm @2    4 weeks ago
it could have been made two years ago and the vitriolic diatribes against President Trump are virtually identical.

Actually, the linguistics professor John McWhorter is particularly eloquent. 

 
 
 
epistte
2.2.1  epistte  replied to  JohnRussell @2.2    4 weeks ago
Actually, the linguistics professor John McWhorter is particularly eloquent. 

I love John McWhorter.  I didn't want either of these lectures to end.

https://www.thegreatcourses.com/courses/understanding-linguistics-the-science-of-language.html

https://www.thegreatcourses.com/courses/language-families-of-the-world.html

 
 
 
†hε pε⊕pレε'š ƒïšh
3  †hε pε⊕pレε'š ƒïšh    4 weeks ago

There is no doubt he's a retard but I have to say the Democrat field is strikingly similar this campaign season.

You just couldn't ask for more, an idiot like Trump vs (insert the moonbat moron here)

American politics is a complete joke on both sides of the aisle and the entire draw on this site is watching people pick a team, team moron and defend it till the end of time.

Fascinating human study of retarded tribalism every day.

 
 
 
katrix
3.1  katrix  replied to  †hε pε⊕pレε'š ƒïšh @3    4 weeks ago

Most people who would make decent Presidents are too intelligent to run.

 
 
 
Tacos!
4  Tacos!    4 weeks ago

I don't love a lot of what Trump says, but at least his way of speaking seems to be genuinely him and it's clearly something a lot of people can relate to. There is some contrast in this respect to Obama, the code-switcher in-chief. And while that guy could deliver a speech well enough, there was so much about his extemporaneous speaking that seemed false and condescending to many people. On the other hand, you might think that skill is an asset. I'm pretty sure he did.

All of this is in the way of trivia or "inside baseball" analysis, though. Day-to-day, I think this may be one of the more overrated qualities of a president. I enjoy a good speaker, but there is so much more to the job.

 
 
 
Dismayed Patriot
4.1  Dismayed Patriot  replied to  Tacos! @4    4 weeks ago
at least his way of speaking seems to be genuinely him and it's clearly something a lot of people can relate to

"We won with poorly educated. I love the poorly educated," - Donald J Trump

There is some contrast in this respect to Obama

Yes, Obama was a constitutional professor and knew what he was talking about and was able to eloquently express himself, virtually the exact opposite of Dumb Down Donald.

there was so much about his extemporaneous speaking that seemed false and condescending to many people

But only to those who were offended by what they saw as an "uppitty N*&%^%@#" being better educated than themselves and holding the highest office in the land which just burned their biscuits to no end.

On the other hand, you might think that skill is an asset

I certainly think being well spoken, educated and intelligent enough to express oneself to be a much greater asset than being a half-wit bully who would have been nothing but a low IQ burger flipper if he hadn't inherited nearly half a billion dollars from his father forty years ago.

I think this may be one of the more overrated qualities of a president

Is exactly what someone would have to say when they realized they helped elect a room temp IQ special needs manchild as President...

 
 
 
Texan1211
4.1.1  Texan1211  replied to  Dismayed Patriot @4.1    4 weeks ago
"We won with poorly educated. I love the poorly educated," - Donald J Trump

Always have to love it when someone makes a big deal out of that quote---as if Democrats don't love the poorly educated!

What a hoot!

 
 
 
epistte
4.1.2  epistte  replied to  Texan1211 @4.1.1    4 weeks ago
Always have to love it when someone makes a big deal out of that quote---as if Democrats don't love the poorly educated! What a hoot!

Democrats support public education.

Democrats know that every child, no matter who they are, how much their families earn, or where they live, should have access to a high-quality education, from preschool through high school and beyond.” -Democratic Party Platform
 
 
 
Texan1211
4.1.3  Texan1211  replied to  epistte @4.1.2    4 weeks ago
Democrats support public education.

As do Republicans and independents.

 
 
 
epistte
4.1.4  epistte  replied to  Texan1211 @4.1.3    4 weeks ago
As do Republicans and independents.

John Kasich tried to privatize public education with charter schools in Ohio and then cut funding for colleges. That isn't supporting public education. he is considered to be a rational publican.

Gov. John Kasich rejected the notion this afternoon that $5 billion in tax cuts on his watch have deprived the state of money that could have been used to benefit public schools and other services. Kasich defended his proposed school funding formula that would result in cuts for more than half of Ohio’s school districts in remarks at the Ohio Newspaper Association convention at the Polaris Hilton.

In Kansas they cut the school year shot because they didn't have money to pay the teachers.

Two school districts, Concordia Unified School District and Twin Valley Unified School District, announced earlier this month that they would end the year early because they lacked the funds to keep the schools open. This week, four more districts confirmed they would also shorten their calendars, according to the Topeka Capital-Journal.

The four newly reported closings are in the unified school districts of Smoky Valley, Haven, Skyline and Shawnee Heights. The Capital-Journal reports that most Kansas schools already exceed the required minimum number of school days, so they can afford to cut a few days without violating state law.

Still, the decision to cut days was a painful one for school districts, judging from an announcement posted by the Twin Valley school board in late March, just days after Brownback signed a bill cutting $51 million in school funding for the current year. “The Twin Valley Board of Education made a difficult decision and has approved a change in the last day of school,” the board wrote. “This decision was based on the financial plight of the district. The district has few fiscal reserves to endure the present mid year unplanned financial cuts recently signed into law.”

Republicans in Texas admit that they opposed critical thinking in schools.

It's official: The Republican Party of Texas opposes critical thinking. That's right, drones, and it's part of their official platform.

One of our eagle-eyed readers emailed us to point out this unbelievable passage in the RPT 2012 platform, as adopted at their recent statewide conference.

"Knowledge-Based Education – We oppose the teaching of Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) (values clarification), critical thinking skills and similar programs that are simply a relabeling of Outcome-Based Education (OBE) (mastery learning) which focus on behavior modification and have the purpose of challenging the student’s fixed beliefs and undermining parental authority."
 
 
 
Texan1211
4.1.5  Texan1211  replied to  epistte @4.1.4    4 weeks ago

From the GOP platform:

Academic Excellence for All (Top)
Maintaining American preeminence requires a world-class system of education in which all students can reach their potential. Republicans are leading the effort to create it. Since 1965, the federal government, through more than 100 programs in the Department of Education, has spent $2 trillion on elementary and secondary education with little substantial improvement in academic achievement or high school graduation rates. The United States spends an average of more than $12,000 per pupil per year in public schools, for a total of more than $620 billion. That represents more than 4 percent of GDP devoted to K-12 education in 2011-2012. Of that amount, federal spending amounted to more than $57 billion. Clearly, if money were the solution, our schools would be problem-free.
More money alone does not necessarily equal better performance. After years of trial and error, we know the policies and methods that have actually made a difference in student advancement: Choice in education; building on the basics; STEM subjects and phonics; career and technical education; ending social promotions; merit pay for good teachers; classroom discipline; parental involvement; and strong leadership by principals, superintendents, and locally elected school boards. Because technology has become an essential tool of learning, it must be a key element in our efforts to provide every child equal access and opportunity. We strongly encourage instruction in American history and civics by using the original documents of our founding fathers.
Choice in Education (Top)
We support options for learning, including home-schooling, career and technical education, private or parochial schools, magnet schools, charter schools, online learning, and early-college high schools. We especially support the innovative financing mechanisms that make options available to all children: education savings accounts (ESAs), vouchers, and tuition tax credits. Empowering families to access the learning environments that will best help their children to realize their full potential is one of the greatest civil rights challenges of our time. A young person’s ability to succeed in school must be based on his or her God-given talent and motivation, not an address, ZIP code, or economic status. We propose that the bulk of federal money through Title I for low-income children and through IDEA for children with special needs should follow the child to whatever school the family thinks will work best for them.
In sum, on the one hand enormous amounts of money are being spent for K-12 public education with overall results that do not justify that spending level. On the other hand, the common experience of families, teachers, and administrators forms the basis of what does work in education. In Congress and in the states, Republicans are bridging the gap between those two realities. Congressional Republicans are leading the way forward with major reform legislation advancing the concept of block grants and repealing numerous federal regulations which have interfered with state and local control of public schools. Their Workplace Innovation and Opportunity Act — modernizing workforce programs, repealing mandates, and advancing employment for persons with disabilities — is now law. Their legislation to require transparency in unfunded mandates imposed upon our schools is advancing. Their D.C. Opportunity Scholarship Program should be expanded as a model for the rest of the country. We deplore the efforts of Congressional Democrats and the current President to eliminate this successful program for disadvantaged students in order to placate the leaders of the teachers’ unions.
To ensure that all students have access to the mainstream of American life, we support the English First approach and oppose divisive programs that limit students’ ability to advance in American society. We renew our call for replacing “family planning” programs for teens with sexual risk avoidance education that sets abstinence until marriage as the responsible and respected standard of behavior. That approach — the only one always effective against premarital pregnancy and sexually-transmitted disease — empowers teens to achieve optimal health outcomes. We oppose school-based clinics that provide referral or counseling for abortion and contraception and believe that federal funds should not be used in mandatory or universal mental health, psychiatric, or socio-emotional screening programs. The federal government has pushed states to collect and share vast amounts of personal student and family data, including the collection of social and emotional data. Much of this data is collected without parental consent or notice. This is wholly incompatible with the American Experiment and our inalienable rights.
Title IX (Top)
We emphatically support the original, authentic meaning of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. It affirmed that “no person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance.” That language opened up for girls and women a world of opportunities that had too often been denied to them. That same provision of law is now being used by bureaucrats — and by the current President of the United States — to impose a social and cultural revolution upon the American people by wrongly redefining sex discrimination to include sexual orientation or other categories. Their agenda has nothing to do with individual rights; it has everything to do with power. They are determined to reshape our schools — and our entire society — to fit the mold of an ideology alien to America’s history and traditions. Their edict to the states concerning restrooms, locker rooms, and other facilities is at once illegal, dangerous, and ignores privacy issues. We salute the several states which have filed suit against it.
Sexual assault is a terrible crime. We commend the good-faith efforts by law enforcement, educational institutions, and their partners to address that crime responsibly. Whenever reported, it must be promptly investigated by civil authorities and prosecuted in a courtroom, not a faculty lounge. Questions of guilt or innocence must be decided by a judge and jury, with guilt determined beyond a reasonable doubt. Those convicted of sexual assault should be punished to the full extent of the law. The Administration’s distortion of Title IX to micromanage the way colleges and universities deal with allegations of abuse contravenes our country’s legal traditions and must be halted before it further muddles this complex issue and prevents the proper authorities from investigating and prosecuting sexual assault effectively with due process.
Improving Higher Education (Top)
Our colleges, universities, and trade schools, large and small, public and private, form the world’s greatest assemblage of learning. They drive much of the research that keeps America competitive and, by admitting large numbers of foreign students, convey our values and culture to the world. Their excellence is undermined by an ideological bias deeply entrenched within the current university system. Whatever the solution may be in private institutions, in state schools the trustees have a responsibility to the taxpayers to ensure that their enormous investment is not abused for political indoctrination. We call on state officials to preserve our public colleges, universities, and trade schools as places of learning and the exchange of ideas, not zones of intellectual intolerance or “safe zones,” as if college students need protection from the free exchange of ideas. A student’s First Amendment rights do not end at the schoolhouse gates. Colleges, universities, and trade schools must not infringe on their freedom of speech and association in the name of political correctness. We condemn the campus-based BDS (Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions) campaign against Israel. It is anti-Semitism and should be denounced by advocates of academic freedom.
College Costs (Top)
The cost of a college education has long been on an unsustainable trajectory, rising year by year far ahead of inflation. Nationwide, student debt now exceeds credit card debt with average debt levels per student totaling roughly $27,000. Delinquency rates on student loans are now as high as they were on subprime mortgages during the housing crisis. Over half of recent college grads are unemployed or underemployed, working at jobs for which their expensive educations gave them no preparation. We need new systems of learning to compete with traditional four-year schools: Technical institutions, online universities, life-long learning, and work-based learning in the private sector. Public policy should advance their affordability, innovation, and transparency and should recognize that a four-year degree from a brick-and-mortar institution is not the only path toward a prosperous and fulfilling career.
The federal government should not be in the business of originating student loans. In order to bring down college costs and give students access to a multitude of financing options, private sector participation in student financing should be restored. Any regulation that increases college costs must be challenged to balance its worth against its negative economic impact on students and their families.
In order to encourage new modes of higher education delivery to enter the market, accreditation should be decoupled from federal financing, and states should be empowered to allow a wide array of accrediting and credentialing bodies to operate. This model would foster innovation, bring private industry into the credentialing market, and give students the ability to customize their college experience.

 
 
 
epistte
4.1.6  epistte  replied to  Texan1211 @4.1.5    4 weeks ago

That is a GOP talking point.

BTW, This idea led to private diploma academies that created huge profits with worthless degrees. As soon as they didn't qualify for public loans they all vanished.

In order to encourage new modes of higher education delivery to enter the market, accreditation should be decoupled from federal financing, and states should be empowered to allow a wide array of accrediting and credentialing bodies to operate. This model would foster innovation, bring private industry into the credentialing market, and give students the ability to customize their college experience.
 
 
 
Texan1211
4.1.7  Texan1211  replied to  epistte @4.1.6    4 weeks ago
That is a GOP talking point.

Typical response when you don't like the answer.

Oh, well.

Same old same old.

 
 
 
Tacos!
4.1.8  Tacos!  replied to  Dismayed Patriot @4.1    4 weeks ago
I certainly think being well spoken, educated and intelligent enough to express oneself

That's not what code-switching is, which is what I was talking about when I was said "skill."

Is exactly what someone would have to say when they realized they helped elect a room temp IQ special needs manchild as President...

No, it's what a thoughtful person says when they can think for themselves. When they aren't that kind of person, a polished delivery in a speech is enough to get their vote.

 
 
 
Tessylo
4.1.9  Tessylo  replied to  epistte @4.1.4    4 weeks ago

I have to wonder why the 'president' hired Betsy Devos other than her paying for the position.  The crazy rich bitch wants to tear down public education and replace it with charter schools and

Betsy DeVos Wants to Use America’s Schools to Build “God’s Kingdom”

Trump’s education secretary pick has spent a lifetime working to end public education as we know it.

 
 
 
Tessylo
4.1.10  Tessylo  replied to  Texan1211 @4.1.5    4 weeks ago

Aren't you supposed to provide a source for your copy and paste job?

 
 
 
katrix
4.2  katrix  replied to  Tacos! @4    4 weeks ago
I think this may be one of the more overrated qualities of a president. I enjoy a good speaker, but there is so much more to the job.

I think it's one of the most important parts of the job.  His job is to get a clear and concise message to the American people and to the world, rather than just rambling on like a toddler.

I get what you're saying - apparently a lot of people do relate to his saying exactly what he thinks. And that bewilders me. I WANT my President to be smarter than I am, and to act like an adult.

 
 
 
lib50
5  lib50    4 weeks ago

The immature way he speaks is bad enough.  I don't understand how anybody finds him an acceptable representative as the head of the country.  Embarrassing.  But somehow all that 'common talk' or 'genuine relatability'  is filled with LIES, which they also find acceptable.  WTF? 

 
 
 
katrix
5.1  katrix  replied to  lib50 @5    4 weeks ago
But somehow all that 'common talk' or 'genuine relatability'  is filled with LIES, which they also find acceptable

That is the most bewildering thing of all. But then, he tells them that what they see and hear isn't real ... and apparently that works. Even when they hear him say something, when he denies having said it, they don't care. He's a pathological liar; he lies even when there's no benefit to him. Such as his repeated lies about where his father was born.

 
 
Loading...
Loading...

Who is online




igknorantzrulz
ArkansasHermit-too
Bob Nelson
Drakkonis


43 visitors