How to Spot Heat Exhaustion Because, Wow, It's Freaking Hot Outside

  
Via:  karri  •  one month ago  •  59 comments

How to Spot Heat Exhaustion Because, Wow, It's Freaking Hot Outside
So, how can you tell the difference between simply craving the sweet, sweet embrace of an air-conditioned room and getting into potentially dangerous territory with heat exhaustion?

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


How to Spot Heat Exhaustion Because, Wow, It's Freaking Hot Outside

Anna Borges 7/12/2019

Heat wave blazes on: 'Too hot for ice cream'

Listen, I like summer as much as the next girl, but there is such a thing as being too hot. Not only does it suck as a feeling, but your chances of winding up with heat exhaustion can rise as the temperature creeps higher, too. So, how can you tell the difference between simply craving the sweet, sweet embrace of an air-conditioned room and getting into potentially dangerous territory with heat exhaustion? Here’s what to know to stay safe.

What is heat exhaustion?

Heat exhaustion is a temperature-related illness that happens when your body’s usual cooling mechanisms just aren’t cutting it, according to the Mayo Clinic. As a result, you become way too hot, which can eventually be harmful if you don’t take steps to cool down quickly.

In order to keep your core temperature around 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit, your body has a few different mechanisms to cool you down or heat you up when necessary, the Mayo Clinic explains. In extreme heat, especially for long periods of time or while exerting yourself, your body can wind up taking in more heat than it’s able to expel through these mechanisms.

The most noticeable way your body responds to heat and exertion is sweating, Lawrence Phillips, M.D., a cardiologist at NYU Langone Health, tells SELF. Sweat moistens the surface of your body and cools you down as it evaporates, which helps to regulate your temperature, according to the Merck Manual of Diagnosis and Therapy. Pretty freaking handy. But if your body is churning out a ton of sweat in an attempt to cool you down, you can become dehydrated, meaning you lose so much fluid your body can’t function normally.

Another way your body dissipates excess heat is by sending blood out to your arms and legs where blood vessels are closer to the skin, which allows your blood to cool faster than it would in your body’s core, Michael Millin, M.D., associate professor of Emergency Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, tells SELF. The problem is that this means there’s less blood returning to and pumping out of your heart, Dr. Millin explains.

Between the dehydration and blood flow issues, you might start to experience symptoms of heat-related illnesses. You might brush off some of these reactions as normal responses to a hot day, but a lot of them definitely don’t happen every time you’re feeling a little warmer than usual.

A few symptoms set heat exhaustion apart from just feeling really hot.

The thing about heat exhaustion is that its symptoms don’t just strike out of nowhere. Heat exhaustion actually exists on a spectrum of heat-related illnesses, with heat cramps preceding it. If you treat heat cramps in time, you can avoid getting heat exhaustion entirely, so it’s worth going over those symptoms first:

*Heavy sweating
*Muscle cramps
*Fatigue
*Thirst

If you get heat exhaustion, your body basically piles onto the symptoms of heat cramps. In addition to those, you might experience:

*Cool, moist skin with goosebumps even though it’s hot out
*Feeling faint
*Dizziness
*Pale skin
*A fast, weak pulse
*Feeling lightheaded when you stand up
*Nausea and vomiting
*Headache

If you don’t treat heat exhaustion in time, you might wind up with these additional symptoms, which can signal heatstroke:

*Flushed skin that can either feel dry or moist
*Confusion, trouble speaking, or other signs of a scrambled mental state
*A temperature over 104 degrees Fahrenheit

Heatstroke can be life-threatening, so, clearly, it’s best to avoid even setting down a path of heat-related illnesses. Instead of splitting hairs over the question, “Am I just really hot or is something else going on?” focus on tending to your symptoms. That brings us to our next point.
What to do if you think you have heat exhaustion (or are just way too hot)
The good news is that you can often take care of heat cramps, heat exhaustion, or just being super hot by getting someplace cooler and rehydrating.

You might be tempted to chug a ton of water as soon as you can, but remember that rehydrating also means replenishing the electrolytes you lose while sweating, says Dr. Millin. These minerals—primarily sodium, potassium, calcium, chlorine, magnesium, and phosphates—help to make sure your nerves, muscles, heart, and brain all work the way they should, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine. Because the primary electrolyte you lose through sweat is sodium, eating a salty snack as you drink water can help make up for what you’ve lost, as SELF previously reported.

Of course, there’s also the option of downing a sports drink. Drinking these on a regular basis might not be ideal for you because of how sugary they are (though that really depends on your nutritional habits at large), but if it’s what you have available when you feel like you’re overheating, a sports drink is more than fine, says Dr. Phillips.

You can also cool off by putting water on your skin. It’s best to do this somewhere out of the sun, like by going inside and wetting your skin, then fanning it off. This mimics the cooling reaction of sweating, says Dr. Millin. If you’re really hot and unable to go someplace cooler, try to shield yourself without adding to the heat, like by going under a beach umbrella and draping yourself with a wet towel.

If you’re not feeling better after an hour or your symptoms are getting worse, the Mayo Clinic recommends seeking immediate medical attention. You should do the same if you’re unable to hydrate due to vomiting, really feel like you’re going to pass out, or do actually lose consciousness, Dr. Millin says.
How to avoid heat exhaustion

You probably get by now that good hydration is a key preemptive strike against heat exhaustion (seriously, if you’re going to be in the heat, drink plenty of water!), but there’s other stuff you can do, too:
Watch your alcohol intake.

As someone who just spent a weekend drinking margaritas on the beach, I know this isn’t the most enticing suggestion. But according to Dr. Phillips, alcohol and heat don’t mix. Alcohol can be dehydrating, which we already know can contribute to heat-related illnesses. It might also make you less aware of the symptoms of something like heat exhaustion. Because you know what else makes you dizzy, nauseated, flushed, and tired? Oh, right. Drinking.

I’m not saying you can’t drink in the heat, but if you’re going to, make sure you’re taking the right precautions, like keeping your water-to-alcohol ratio even, eating enough, and maybe going for drinks that are lower in alcohol, like beer and spiked seltzer over mixed cocktails.
Plan ahead.

People who aren’t used to extreme heat are a lot more likely to run into trouble with heat-related illness, says Dr. Millin. Like, if you’re on vacation somewhere a lot hotter than home and jump right into an adventurous hike. Give yourself time to acclimate.

Another instance where you can plan ahead: If you know you’re going to spend a lot of time exerting yourself outside this summer. If so, you might want to consider getting some oral rehydration powder or tablets in case of emergency, says Dr. Millin. You can mix them into water to get the electrolytes you need, and some people might find them easier to keep handy or prefer them to a salty snack or sugary drink.
Protect against sunburn.

If you get a sunburn, you’re more at risk of developing heat exhaustion. Sunburn itself is a form of heat illness and affects your body’s ability to cool down. The Mayo Clinic suggests wearing a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses and using a broad-spectrum sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 when outdoors. Don’t forget to reapply as directed.

Make a plan for extra bad days.

If a heat wave is on the horizon and you don’t live somewhere with air conditioning, scout out where you might be able to spend free time. Libraries and malls are great.
Talk to your doctor if you take certain medications.

According to the Mayo Clinic, certain medications can screw with your body’s ability to stay hydrated, like diuretics, antihistamines, and antidepressants. If you’re on medication that you think might be affecting your odds of staying cool in the heat, talk to your doctor for some tips on how to deal.

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Karri
1  seeder  Karri    one month ago

Okay, so this is my first seed on NT.  Please excuse me for some mistakes I made in formatting.  I will keep learning.

 
 
 
TTGA
1.1  TTGA  replied to  Karri @1    one month ago
Okay, so this is my first seed on NT.  Please excuse me for some mistakes I made in formatting.  I will keep learning.

You did just fine Karri. 

All through yesterday and up to about two hours ago, it was in the high 90's with high humidity here in southern Michigan.  Wind and rain last night didn't cool anything down much.  Then, a couple of hours ago, the clouds came in with a strong westerly wind (sometimes up to 60 mph).  About an hour ago, the rain started coming down. That cooled everything down by about 20 degrees.  The rain is gone now but the cool wind continues.  My daughter just said that the temp is now 73.  I doubt that it will continue for long (very hot and humid is pretty much standard for Michigan in late July), but we can enjoy it while it lasts.  Usually at this time of year, I look back on running the snow blower with some pleasure.  Of course, in January, I have equal pleasure in anticipating the warmer weather.  In the end, it evens out.  (Perrie, we are missing both sweating and shivering emoticons.  They would fit this weather perfectly).

 
 
 
Gordy327
1.2  Gordy327  replied to  Karri @1    one month ago

Good seed Karri. Informative too. Kudos!

The only thing I would add is that as the body profusely sweats in an attempt to cool down, dehydration (or nausea and vomiting) can lead to electrolyte imbalances. Muscle cramping, as you specified, is a symptom of that. As the imbalance worsens, it can lead to heart rhythm irregularities and even seizures. Usually, the imbalance becomes more pronounced as one enters into the heat stroke stage. That's when it's life threatening. Proper hydration (preferably with water) is the best means to prevent or combat heat exhaustion and stroke.

As a side note, it's important to avoid consuming things that act as a diuretic, such as caffeinated beverages or alcohol.

 
 
 
Karri
2  seeder  Karri    one month ago

This for everyone living through the current heatwave.  Please stay cool and safe.

 
 
 
Freefaller
2.1  Freefaller  replied to  Karri @2    one month ago

Lol, if it will help you can send some of the heat my way, it's been a terrible (wet and cool) summer here so far

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3  sandy-2021492    one month ago

Thanks for this info, Karri.  I imagine many of our members are experiencing the current heat wave.  I know we are here in Virginia.  Take care of yourselves, folks.

I took the dog for his walk this morning, when it was still relatively cool, and we didn't stay out long.  There's no outdoor work around my house that needs to be done badly enough for me to roast myself doing it.  The weeds will still be there when it's cooler.

I saw that a 32-year-old former NFL player died of heat stroke yesterday.  Presumably, he was in pretty good physical shape, but that doesn't make one immune.  We all sweat.

 
 
 
Karri
3.1  seeder  Karri  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3    one month ago
I saw that a 32-year-old former NFL player died of heat stroke yesterday. 

Thanks for mentioning that.  I read about that shortly before I found this story -- and, because of his death. I realized that more people need to know about the signs and symptoms of heat problems.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3.1.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  Karri @3.1    one month ago

My sister is living in New Mexico, and she went golfing last weekend, with temps over 100.  Even though she was driving a cart and drinking a lot of water, she reached a point where she stopped sweating.  She knew what was happening, and headed back to the clubhouse to sit in the AC and drink a sports drink (instead of plain water).  She said it took a few days before she felt like herself again.

Even when you're trying to be careful (although "careful" would actually have been staying inside)and hydrate, this heat can be dangerous.

 
 
 
MUVA
4  MUVA    one month ago

I work outside every day the last two days I live in VA we actually curtailed our hours to 12 a day.

 
 
 
Karri
4.1  seeder  Karri  replied to  MUVA @4    one month ago

Curtailed to 12 hour?  That is still too much, unless those hours are overnight hours.

Make sure you have plenty of liquids nearby and take some time to cool off in an air conditioned environment -- or at least under a shady tree.  And, of course, remember the sun block.

 
 
 
MUVA
4.1.1  MUVA  replied to  Karri @4.1    one month ago

We start early take a break and come back in the late afternoon this time of year we usually work between 14 16 hours a day we are in the boat business.  My wifes office has air conditioning and the shop has BIG EXHAUST  fans we also run a sprinkler on the roof when it is this hot. 

 
 
 
Kathleen
5  Kathleen    one month ago

Thank you for the article, it’s been brutal out there.

 
 
 
MUVA
5.1  MUVA  replied to  Kathleen @5    one month ago

I took a boat to the water this morning at the boat ramp the water temp at the Lynnhaven inlet was 87 refreshing 

 
 
 
Kavika
6  Kavika     one month ago

It's 90 degress here in central Florida. About usual for this time of the year...

Friends in SW Missouri called us today and the temp at their house was 101...Really hot.

Family in Richmond VA said it was 103 at their house today...

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
6.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  Kavika @6    one month ago

97 in the mountains of Virginia, with high humidity.  

 
 
 
MUVA
6.1.1  MUVA  replied to  sandy-2021492 @6.1    one month ago

I'm on the coast basically on the chesapeake bay in the early morning it hasn't been to bad but by 10 am the humidity has been unbearable I sent my employees home  yesterday at twelve. 

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
6.1.2  sandy-2021492  replied to  MUVA @6.1.1    one month ago

A friend in Richmond just posted a pic of her car's thermometer readout on Facebook - 103, even this late in the afternoon.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
6.2  Raven Wing  replied to  Kavika @6    one month ago

It's only 88 degrees now here in So Calif., but, may warm up a bit more later this afternoon to about 90. Starting next Wed it is predicted to be in the 101-102 degrees through Saturday, but, as the weather here is variable it could be lower or higher by then.

Even so, that is normal weather for this are at this time of the year.  June was actually a bit cooler than usual for most of the month. Luckily, So Calif being desert area we normally have very low humidity so we don't suffer from the high humidity as does the mid-west and east coast. 

I lived for part of my youth in East Texas and we had a great deal of humidity, and I hated the mold mildew that ruined a lot of my stuff. From 2004 to 2008 I lived in No Virginia and again experienced the humidity and nasty mold and mildew. It was like living in East Texas again. (Ugh!)

So, I'll take So Calif any day. Summer temps of 110-115 are not that unusual here. Kind of par for our summer temps.

 
 
 
Karri
6.2.1  seeder  Karri  replied to  Raven Wing @6.2    one month ago
So Calif being desert area we normally have very low humidity

It's like the difference between waking to a sauna or an oven!  

 
 
 
TTGA
6.2.2  TTGA  replied to  Raven Wing @6.2    one month ago
It's only 88 degrees now here in So Calif., but, may warm up a bit more later this afternoon to about 90.

Raven,

That sounds about right for Southern California.  I looked at the weather channel yesterday and it showed 92 here in Michigan.  That isn't unusually high at this time of year.  Then....what the heck!!!!  The same national map showed 73 in Honolulu.  I've been there a few times and I've never known it to get that cool.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
6.2.3  Raven Wing  replied to  TTGA @6.2.2    one month ago

The weather here in So Cal varies from year to year and some ways, depending on the Jet Stream and if there are any El Ninos or El Ninas around that year that affects the weather pattern. I live a good ways East of Los Angeles in the Inland Empire area, and it is a very desert like area. So we get much warmer weather in the summer, and much colder weather in the winter. 

So we sort of take what we get and do the best we can with the variations. jrSmiley_74_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Raven Wing
6.2.4  Raven Wing  replied to  Karri @6.2.1    one month ago
It's like the difference between waking to a sauna or an oven!

True. But, without the humidity the heat does not seem that oppressive. We do get some tropical storms that drift up this way from the coast of Mexico once in a while in the summer, and the humidity with the heat does get rather uncomfortable. But, that is a rarity. Thank goodness!

 
 
 
Freedom Warrior
6.2.5  Freedom Warrior  replied to  TTGA @6.2.2    one month ago

Unusually cool year here in San Diego. No need for A/C so far but the Santa Anas will probably change that situation come September if not in August when the tropical humidity arrives from South. Still we have the fewest days of sunshine here on the coast that I can recall. Plenty of rain and moisture to go with.  Up in NorCal Lake Tahoe has reached its limit with the run off from the Sierras.

We have had some warm days inland but no heat wave.  For example, today only 80 degrees 10 miles inland. Temp increases about 1 degree per mile from the coast until it tops out in 100’s in the desert.

 
 
 
Karri
6.2.6  seeder  Karri  replied to  TTGA @6.2.2    one month ago
The same national map showed 73 in Honolulu. 

Because they are islands, that get that wonderful ocean breeze.  

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
7  Perrie Halpern R.A.    one month ago

Great article to publish Kerri. I fixed the formatting for you. No worries about that. 

My cousins are in from England and right now they are in Washington DC. I am hoping that they can make it through this horrible weather with 3 young girls in tow. We are melting in NY. 

 
 
 
Karri
7.1  seeder  Karri  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @7    one month ago

Thank you.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7.2  Raven Wing  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @7    one month ago
My cousins are in from England and right now they are in Washington DC. I am hoping that they can make it through this horrible weather with 3 young girls in tow

D.C. is an oven even in normal summer weather conditions. I had to go there several times in the summer when I lived in No Virginia and it was like walking around in a sauna, even when the temps were not really that high. I lived 30 minutes from D.C. and the difference in Warrenton compared to D.C. was considerable, both in temps and humidity. 

So with the extra hot temps in D.C. your Cousin and her girls will likely have a very uncomfortable day today.

 
 
 
dave-2693993
7.2.1  dave-2693993  replied to  Raven Wing @7.2    one month ago

I am north of DC by an hour and a half best possible rush hour time and it is 85F inside right now. The a/c is sputtering. Thank goodness for my 1940 GE all metal oscillating fan right now...then again I have been at he shop the last 2 weeks pretty much straight and will be again soon enough...bids and proposals hand over fist right now and and POWERFUL A/C!!!

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7.2.2  Raven Wing  replied to  dave-2693993 @7.2.1    one month ago

While I enjoyed my time spent on the East Coast all the way down to Ft Myers FL, and visited the many sights and loved the landscape, I was really glad to be able to get back to So Cal after my 4 year stay there. I was researching my Cherokee roots on both sides of my family in the Shenandoah area and the No Georgia area while there, as well as taking part in several programs as a Microsoft MVP. And being a Microsoft software Instructor at two Community Colleges in Warrenton. 

It was a great experience, but, as the old saying goes, "There's no place like home". (smile)

 
 
 
dave-2693993
7.2.3  dave-2693993  replied to  Raven Wing @7.2.2    one month ago
It was a great experience, but, as the old saying goes, "There's no place like home". (smile)

I can understand Raven Wing.

I can understand the differences in heat between the East Coast and West Coast.

It has been weeks since the relative humidity has been below 90% here.

That last time I was at Luke AFB the lowest the temps got was 108 at night. It was a hot stretch, but probably good for training at the time.

Not long after, we were in La Jolla and Miramar was just a mile or so down the road from the Embassy Suites. What a difference in temperature with that cold Pacific flow. June Gloom was amazing. 

 
 
 
Freedom Warrior
7.2.4  Freedom Warrior  replied to  dave-2693993 @7.2.3    one month ago

Yeah that’s the slogan we use marketing our hotel to tourists here in La Jolla,  the May Gray and June gloom are ... 😉😎

 kidding aside I’m damn glad that somebody likes June gloom because it’s the worst month of the year for weather here 

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7.2.5  Raven Wing  replied to  dave-2693993 @7.2.3    one month ago
Not long after, we were in La Jolla and Miramar was just a mile or so down the road from the Embassy Suites. What a difference in temperature with that cold Pacific flow. June Gloom was amazing. 

Since 1960 I have lived in various areas of So Cal, mostly in the San Diego area. I lived in Chula Vista, Pacific Beach, Clairmont, San Diego proper and lastly Santee. I have also lived in Glendora, Azusa, Pomona, Chino, Fontana and now near Riverside. So I have experienced a variety of weather over the years, as each area seems to have their own weather during the year. June Gloom is indeed rather depressing in itself, and add that to living 4 blocks from the beach with the sometimes endless fog rolling in like huge cotton balls bouncing about, and the ships fog horns drowning in the distance, it makes it even more so. But, it was much cooler in the beach area than in the inland areas. However, I was really glad to move out of that area where it was more 'normal' weather. (grin)

 
 
 
Karri
7.2.6  seeder  Karri  replied to  Raven Wing @7.2.5    one month ago

Now you are making me homesick.  If only I could afford to live there.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7.2.7  Raven Wing  replied to  Karri @7.2.6    one month ago

I live in a senior community that is fairly reasonable, and there are many very nice people here. The resident staff are very helpful and accommodating. Where I am is not as expensive as other parts of So Cal and it's close to all the necessities.

 
 
 
dave-2693993
7.2.8  dave-2693993  replied to  Freedom Warrior @7.2.4    4 weeks ago
 kidding aside I’m damn glad that somebody likes June gloom because it’s the worst month of the year for weather here 

It was perfect timing after Luke.

 
 
 
CB
8  CB     one month ago

This is a helpful article. And, I love the mentions of how to head-off heat problems! Also, I am told a sure clue that one is heading in a dangerous direction of heat dehydration is the golden (darking) shades and coloration of one's urine. An indicator to get more water/electrolytes.

 
 
 
Karri
8.1  seeder  Karri  replied to  CB @8    one month ago
golden (darking) shades and coloration of one's urine.

It is a sign of dehydration.  You can also get it if you have been limiting your water intake, have diarrhea, or possibly have some kidney problems.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
9  Raven Wing    one month ago

Stay safe everyone. Be smart, as heat stroke can happen before you realize it. Don't take any unusual feeling for granted, it could turn deadly very quickly. 

Keeping all those in the danger areas in my thoughts and prayers. 

 
 
 
MUVA
10  MUVA    one month ago

We have a place at snowshoe we thought about going there but it is just as hot there I thought it was always cool in the mountainsjrSmiley_91_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
10.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  MUVA @10    one month ago

Having lived in the mountains of WV - nope.

My ex still lives there.  His AC is threatening to give out.

 
 
 
MUVA
10.1.1  MUVA  replied to  sandy-2021492 @10.1    one month ago

We sometime  go there in the summer but not every often my wife is a beach girl. She is headed there now for the sun set and have a cocktail or three with her friends they do it about three time a week.Stay cool Sandy have a good night.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
10.1.2  sandy-2021492  replied to  MUVA @10.1.1    one month ago

You, too, MUVA.

 
 
 
†hε pε⊕pレε'š ƒïšh
11  †hε pε⊕pレε'š ƒïšh    one month ago

Why all the warnings, it's just summer

Where I live. No one hides inside when it hits the 100s. It's summer. Get outside and have fun. 

I heard NYC canceled a music festival? Why? I've never heard of cancelling events because it's hot. Carry water and slap on sunscreen and quit complaining.

 
 
 
Sunshine
11.1  Sunshine  replied to  †hε pε⊕pレε'š ƒïšh @11    one month ago

384

 
 
 
dave-2693993
12  dave-2693993    one month ago

Great article Kerri, thank you.

More of these would be great. !!!

 
 
 
Karri
12.1  seeder  Karri  replied to  dave-2693993 @12    one month ago

I'll see what I can find.

 
 
 
charger 383
13  charger 383    one month ago

Please take care of your animals in this weather

 
 
 
Karri
13.1  seeder  Karri  replied to  charger 383 @13    one month ago

Thanks, charger.  I also want to add --  NEVER LEAVE KIDS OR ANIMALS IN CARS.  The temperature in the car can rise to dangerous levels very quickly.

 
 
 
GregTx
14  GregTx    one month ago

When you stop sweating is when you should really be worried. Always hydrate before, don't wait till the day of!

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
14.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  GregTx @14    one month ago

And remember to replace electrolytes.  Sometimes, water just isn't enough.

 
 
 
Jeremy Retired in NC
15  Jeremy Retired in NC    one month ago

One key think is keeping a good rest cycle.  So many minutes working, so many minutes resting in the shade.  This, of course is in addition to a good diet and drinking water.  

I've worked in environments that have hit 145.  After acclimation to the heat and everything above, not a single issue.

 
 
 
Steve Ott
16  Steve Ott    one month ago

Very timely article Karri. Only thing I might add, is that the same thing can happen at altitude. I used to live in the mountains of Northern New Mexico. You can burn and dehydrate just as quickly at 9000 feet as at 1000 feet. My wife and I always carry water with us, even just driving around town. We now live in El Paso, TX, currently 102 as I write this.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
17  Raven Wing    one month ago

Going to be pretty warm here for the next 6 days, with temps above 100 degrees, and 104 degrees on Wednesday. Not unusual for July here. Then back down to the mid to upper 90's. Since July has been relatively cooler than usual for most of the month, it will be interesting to see what temps in August and September will be like. They are usually the hottest months of the summer here. 

 
 
 
Freefaller
17.1  Freefaller  replied to  Raven Wing @17    one month ago
it will be interesting to see what temps in August and September will be like. They are usually the hottest months of the summer here. 

Snicker:) August should be ok here, may get some snow in September (definitely in October).  Like I've said before I am willing to trade weather with anyone who is willing

 
 
 
Raven Wing
17.1.1  Raven Wing  replied to  Freefaller @17.1    one month ago
Like I've said before I am willing to trade weather with anyone who is willing

Where do you live? I have an MS Access developer buddy that lives in Bendigo, Victoria, Australia and it is fun communicating, as when it's summer here it's winter there. 

Starting tomorrow it will be 102, 103,101,103,102 and 101 through the next six days. Then back down to the low 90's again for the rest of the month. jrSmiley_74_smiley_image.gif 

 
 
 
Freefaller
17.1.2  Freefaller  replied to  Raven Wing @17.1.1    4 weeks ago
Where do you live? I

Lol central Alberta Canada, while our summers are never as good as your normal they are generally better than what we've been getting this year.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
17.1.3  Raven Wing  replied to  Freefaller @17.1.2    4 weeks ago

Ahhh....that explains the early snows. In August and September here we can get temps as high as 110-112 at times during the month. The only time the heat really feels oppressive is when we get a tropical storm carry over from the South Pacific and the humidity goes up. Otherwise, it is a dry heat that is not so overpowering. 

I have lived in So Calif most of my adult life, so I guess it is a matter of what you get used to. 

 
 
 
Freefaller
17.1.4  Freefaller  replied to  Raven Wing @17.1.3    4 weeks ago
so I guess it is a matter of what you get used to.

That's the truth

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
18  sandy-2021492    one month ago

We went from blistering heat to torrential downfalls.  The sheriff's office flooded yesterday, and the storm drains overflowed on Main St.

At least it's cool outside.

 
 
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