Stephen Miller's Plan Is Coming to Fruition

  
Via:  tessylo  •  one month ago  •  6 comments

Stephen Miller's Plan Is Coming to Fruition

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U.S.

Stephen Miller's Plan Is Coming to Fruition



f2d283c0-bbb7-11e5-a172-adb2f9451ed7_9df   Charles P. Pierce, Esquire   21 hours ago  






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From Esquire

Over the weekend, both   The New York Times   and the   Washington Post   ran lengthy profiles of Stephen Miller, the chief button man behind the murder of America's image in the world. Some of the passages, particularly in the   Post,   were unsurprisingly horrifying.


  Barely a decade removed from college, Miller is at the seat of power. His authority has grown in recent months as he engineered a leadership purge at the Department of Homeland Security, removing or reassigning the head of every immigration-related agency in a span of just seven weeks. And his long-sought policy goals are reaching fruition. On Monday, Miller secured tighter immigration rules that can disqualify green-card applicants if they are poor or deemed likely to use public assistance, cutting off a pathway to U.S. citizenship for those immigrants who could become a burden on taxpayers, or “public charges.”


  Miller’s horizon extends beyond one or even two presidential terms. He views the public charge rule as vital to his goal of reducing immigration, and he has told colleagues it will have “socially transformative effects” on American society. “Immigration is an issue that affects all others,” Miller said, speaking in structured paragraphs. “Immigration affects our health-care system. Immigration affects our education system. Immigration affects our public safety, it affects our national security, it affects our economy and our financial system. It touches upon everything, but the goal is to create an immigration system that enhances the vibrancy, the unity, the togetherness and the strength of our society.”

This is a man capable of anything.

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From this, of course, come the policy decisions that have tagged Adam Serwer's epigram— The Cruelty Is The Point— to this administration like the carving on a tombstone. And   CNBC   brings us its latest manifestation:   Get sick and die in your cages. We don't care.


  “In general, due to the short-term nature of CBP holding and the complexities of operating vaccination programs, neither CBP nor its medical contractors administer vaccinations to those in our custody,” a Customs and Border Protection spokeswoman said in an emailed statement. At least three children who were held in detention centers after crossing into the U.S. from Mexico have died in recent months, in part, from the flu, according to a letter to Reps. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., and Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif., from several doctors urging Congress to investigate health conditions at the centers.


  The U.S. had previously gone almost a decade without any children dying while under U.S. immigration custody.


  “I can tell you from personal experience that child deaths are rare events,” Harvard pediatrics professor Dr. Jonathan Winickoff said in an email. Winickoff, who is also the director of pediatric research for Harvard’s Tobacco Research and Treatment Center, signed on to the Aug. 1 letter with forensic pathologist Judy Melinek and Johns Hopkins public health professors Dr. Joshua Sharfstein and Dr. Paul Spiegel.


  They said the U.S. death rate in children from the flu is about one in 600,000. So far, three children have died out of 200,000 people held at detention facilities along the border, they wrote. “When I learned that multiple children had died in detention from potentially preventable causes, it truly disturbed me,” Winickoff said. “The country needs urgent answers to that question so that children stop dying in detention.

They're   supposed to die in detention,   Doctor. That's the damn plan.


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Tessylo
1  seeder  Tessylo    one month ago

From this, of course, come the policy decisions that have tagged Adam Serwer's epigram—The Cruelty Is The Point—to this administration like the carving on a tombstone. And CNBC brings us its latest manifestation: Get sick and die in your cages. We don't care.


 “In general, due to the short-term nature of CBP holding and the complexities of operating vaccination programs, neither CBP nor its medical contractors administer vaccinations to those in our custody,” a Customs and Border Protection spokeswoman said in an emailed statement. At least three children who were held in detention centers after crossing into the U.S. from Mexico have died in recent months, in part, from the flu, according to a letter to Reps. Rosa DeLauro, D-Conn., and Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif., from several doctors urging Congress to investigate health conditions at the centers.


 The U.S. had previously gone almost a decade without any children dying while under U.S. immigration custody.


 “I can tell you from personal experience that child deaths are rare events,” Harvard pediatrics professor Dr. Jonathan Winickoff said in an email. Winickoff, who is also the director of pediatric research for Harvard’s Tobacco Research and Treatment Center, signed on to the Aug. 1 letter with forensic pathologist Judy Melinek and Johns Hopkins public health professors Dr. Joshua Sharfstein and Dr. Paul Spiegel.


 They said the U.S. death rate in children from the flu is about one in 600,000. So far, three children have died out of 200,000 people held at detention facilities along the border, they wrote. “When I learned that multiple children had died in detention from potentially preventable causes, it truly disturbed me,” Winickoff said. “The country needs urgent answers to that question so that children stop dying in detention.

They're supposed to die in detention, Doctor. That's the damn plan.

 
 
 
Ronin2
1.1  Ronin2  replied to  Tessylo @1    one month ago

More BS.

So it is the Trump's fault that they illegally came up here en masse, overwhelmed our Congressionally space limited detention centers, and that there was no plan or money allocated for one by Congress to cope with this?

We are not responsible for the failure of parents to consider the safety of their kids.  

Trump is doing what he can- by pushing Mexico to actually close their southern border; and stop the caravans from coming through Mexico from reaching our borders. Also, having Mexico hold those that speak Spanish until their amnesty court dates. 

Trump cannot write laws. He can only enforce them. If Democrats want to change immigration policy (not open borders and free stuff) they can get a bill started in the House which they control. 

I have suggested allowing immigrants to request amnesty at US Embassies and Consulates in their home country. That would prevent the unnecessary and dangerous trip to the US when the majority of requests will be rejected.  Of course that would take work and compromise- something Congress hates.

https://immigrationforum.org/article/fact-sheet-u-s-asylum-process/

Nearly 20,500 individuals in FY 2016.   In fiscal year (FY) 2016, the most recent year for which data are available,   20,455 individuals   were granted asylum, which is about 28 percent out of the   73,081 cases . Approval rates   varied   by immigration court from about 10 percent to 80 percent.

USCIS   approved   11,729 affirmative asylum applications in FY 2016, representing slightly more than 10 percent out of the 115,399 affirmative asylum applications filed with the agency. This represented a 34 percent decline from the 17,787 affirmative asylum applications granted in FY 2015. The decrease   occurred   as the administration transferred a large number of USCIS asylum officers from the affirmative interview process to conduct credible and reasonable fear screening interviews. Even with increased overall staffing within the USCIS Asylum Division, the number of affirmative applications granted declined considerably and the number of applications climbed to a 12-year high of almost 200,000, as fewer asylum officers were assigned to review affirmative applications.

In FY 2016, 8,726 individuals were granted asylum defensively by an immigration judge or the Board of Immigration Appeals, an increase of 7 percent over the 8,246 defensive asylum grants in FY 2015.

In FY 2017, as instability in Central America’s   Northern Triangle   showed few signs of ending, immigration judges   decided   over 30,000 asylum cases, a considerable increase over the roughly 22,300 asylum cases decided in FY 2016, and the most FY 2005.

However, the denial rate grew along with number of asylum cases, climbing to 61.8 percent in FY 2017, up from 56.5 percent in FY 2016. Five years earlier, the denial rate stood at 44.5 percent.

 

Asylum-Factsheet_Pic1.png
Source:   http://trac.syr.edu/immigration/reports/491/

 
 
 
Tessylo
1.1.1  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  Ronin2 @1.1    one month ago

Seeking asylum is not illegal.  

 
 
 
Ronin2
1.1.2  Ronin2  replied to  Tessylo @1.1.1    one month ago

Entering our country illegally to do so is.

 
 
 
Tessylo
1.1.3  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  Ronin2 @1.1.2    one month ago

More BS.  Entering the country to seek asylum is  NOT ILLEGAL.  

 
 
 
Tessylo
2  seeder  Tessylo    one month ago

There's also this:

‘CRUEL BEYOND IMAGINATION’

Trump Administration Launches Plan to Indefinitely Detain Migrant Children

Ending the Flores agreement would be the president’s most aggressive attack on undocumented kids since family separation.

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Scott Bixby

National Reporter

Updated 08.21.19 11:51AM ET Published 08.20.19 9:14PM ET 
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In a stunning escalation, the Trump administration announced Wednesday that it will abrogate a decades-old legal agreement in order to indefinitely detain immigrant families.

The proposed termination of what’s known as the Flores agreement is President Donald Trump’s most aggressive—and most legally suspect—attempt to circumvent legal protections for undocumented children since his disastrous “zero-tolerance” policy resulted in the separation of thousands of immigrant families.

ADVERTISING

“No child should be a pawn in a scheme to manipulate our immigration system,” Acting Secretary of Homeland Security Kevin McAleenan told reporters in a press conference Wednesday morning. “This action by the administration is just one part of our overall effort, but it’s an essential one.”

Under the new regulations, set to go into effect 60 days from this Friday pending the approval of a federal judge, the Trump administration would formally abolish the Flores agreement’s key standard of care: a 20-day limit on holding children in immigration detention. While McAleenan stated that “there is no intent to hold families for a long period of time,” the rule change would allow for families to be held in detention indefinitely, pending a final ruling on their case.

The Daily Caller first reported the impending changes to the agreement on Tuesday evening, quoting a senior administration official as saying that “today the administration is closing one of the legal loopholes that has allowed human traffickers and smugglers to exploit our vulnerabilities at the southern border.”

Ending the agreement, the official continued, “plays a vital role in the strategy to restore the integrity to our immigration system and our national security.”

Named for 15-year-old Jenny Lisette Flores, who fled El Salvador in the 1980s and was detained among adults in dangerous conditions by the Immigration and Naturalization Services—and not for a “Judge Flores,” as Trump once claimed—the agreement created stringent standards regarding the detention and release of undocumented children in U.S. government custody. Most notably, the federal government is required to release children into the custody of licensed care programs within 20 days, as well as to place children in the least restrictive setting possible, with access to sanitary facilities, medical treatment, and contact with family members.

  • NO PLACE FOR CHILDREN

    Doctors Warn More Children Could Die in Border Lockups

    Scott Bixby

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McAleenan declared that while the government currently only has between 2,500 and 3,000 beds available for holding families—for context, roughly 107,000 family units were apprehended while attempting to enter the United States in Fiscal Year 2018—the settings will be “campus-like” in nature, with libraries, schools, and assurances that kids will be “well cared for.”

But pediatricians, child welfare advocates and immigration attorneys have well-founded fears that this will not be the case. Six children have died in immigration custody in the past eight months, and healthcare experts have told The Daily Beast that no length of detention is safe for children.

“The conditions to which he was subject are not supportive of recovery, and also, because of the stress of the experience, place children at very high risk for infectious diseases,” said Dr. Julie Linton, co-chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics Immigrant Health Special Interest Group and a practicing pediatrician. “When children are sick, exposure to stress hormones makes it much more difficult to recover from illness.”

The Flores agreement has long been one of the highest barriers to Trump’s immigration agenda, particularly in the context of the administration’s family separation policy. Trump and administration officials pointed to the FSA as the reason behind family separation, with then-White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders telling reporters in June that “the separation of illegal alien families is the product of the same legal loopholes that Democrats refuse to close, and these laws are the same that have been on the books for over a decade.”

The Trump administration has supported legislation that would make it easier to hold children indefinitely, and has brazenly flouted many of the Flores agreement’s key stipulations, including holding undocumented minors for weeks longer than the 20-day maximum, arguing that the Flores only applies to unaccompanied children, rather than those who arrived at the U.S. border with family members. (A federal appellate court ruled in 2016 that Flores applies to all minors, unaccompanied and otherwise.)

Immigrant Advocates Blast Trump’s ‘Dastardly’ New Policy

In September 2018, the Trump administration floated a potential rule changethat would allow for the long-term detention of immigrant children and families by allowing the federal government to license detention centers run by Immigration and Customs Enforcement as suitable for the long-term detention of children. The FSA requires that children be released after 20 days into the custody of state-licensed residential facilities—the proposal would instead give that licensing authority to the federal government.

“Today, legal loopholes significantly hinder the department’s ability to appropriately detain and promptly remove family units that have no legal basis to remain in the country,” then-Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said in a statement at the time. “This rule addresses one of the primary pull factors for illegal immigration and allows the federal government to enforce immigration laws as passed by Congress.”

After the plan was first crafted, the Department of Homeland Security punted on the proposal, instead asking Congress to re-work Flores.

Like many of the Trump administration’s other attempts to weaken legal protections for immigrants, McAleenan admitted that decision to change the FSA to allow for the indefinite detention of families will almost certainly be met with legal challenges from advocacy organizations.

“We do expect litigation,” McAleenan said.

Madhuri Grewal, policy counsel for the American Civil Liberties Union, nearly guaranteed a legal challenge in a statement released following the official announcement.

“This is yet another cruel attack on children, who the Trump administration has targeted again and again with its anti-immigrant policies,” Grewal said. “The government should not be jailing kids, and certainly shouldn’t be seeking to put more kids in jail for longer. Congress must not fund this.”

Other advocacy organizations were more succinct in their reaction to the administration’s plan. The Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services tweeted on Wednesday: “It’s cruel beyond imagination.”

 
 
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