Felicity Huffman was sentenced to 14 days behind bars for her role in the college admissions scandal.

  
Via:  john-russell  •  one month ago  •  22 comments

Felicity Huffman was sentenced to 14 days behind bars for her role in the college admissions scandal.
https://people.com/crime/felicity-huffman-sentenced-college-admissions-scam/

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Felicity Huffman Gets 14 Days in College Admissions Scam






Felicity Huffman   was sentenced to 14 days behind bars for her role in the   college admissions scandal .

The   Desperate Housewives   actress, 56, faced a judge on Friday afternoon in a federal courtroom in Boston. In addition to the 14 days incarceration, the judge fined her $30,000 and said she would be on supervised release for one year. She will also have to do 250 hours of community service.

Huffman arrived in court holding the hand of her husband,   William H. Macy . She wore a short-sleeved navy blue dress and low-heeled beige pumps.

She tearfully addressed the judge prior to sentencing, apologizing for her criminal actions and saying she deserved whatever sentence she got. While she spoke, Macy’s eyes welled up with tears.

Huffman must begin her incarceration within 60 days, the judge said. The judge will recommend where she serves her sentence. Martin Murphy, her attorney, asked the judge that Huffman serve her time in a Dublin, Calif. correctional institution near her home.


Huffman   pleaded guilty   in May to conspiracy to commit mail fraud. Prosecutors had recommended that she serve one month in prison, 12 years of supervised release, and pay a $20,000 fine. Huffman’s lawyers asked that she receive one year of probation, 250 hours of community service, and a $20,000 fine.


On March 12, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Massachusetts announced that it had charged 50 people — including Huffman and fellow actress   Lori Loughlin   — in the cheating scandal. The two actresses, along with coaches, admissions counselors, parents, and Laughlin’s husband, fashion designer   J. Mossimo Giannulli , were indicted on accusations of falsifying SAT scores and lying about their athletic skills, among other alleged crimes. (Loughlin and Giannulli have pleaded not guilty.)

Prosecutors said in a criminal complaint that   Huffman paid $15,000   to admissions consultant William “Rick” Singer and his nonprofit organization, Key Worldwide Foundation (“KWF”), which prosecutors said was actually a front for accepting bribes. Singer then facilitated cheating on Huffman’s daughter’s SAT test by having a proctor correct the teen’s answers after the fact.






Felicity Huffman and William H. Macy

Nic Antaya for The Boston Globe via Getty





Huffman discussed the scheme in a phone call with Singer that was recorded by investigators.

In   an emotional letter   to the judge, Huffman says it was “desperation to be a good mother” that led her to pay $15,000 to fake her daughter’s SAT scores — and she’ll feel “utter shame” for the rest of her life.

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JohnRussell
1  seeder  JohnRussell    one month ago

If you are wealthy and "famous" you get 14 days. 

Poor kid steals a candy bar in some places and gets the book thrown at him. 

I would think at least 90 days in jail and 2 years probation should have been in order for this cheat. 

 
 
 
Jack_TX
1.1  Jack_TX  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one month ago
I would think at least 90 days in jail and 2 years probation should have been in order for this cheat.

Just curious, and serious question.. why 90 days?  Why not 10 months or 3 years or some other time period?

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.2  XDm9mm  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one month ago
If you are wealthy and "famous" you get 14 days. 

Be glad she got that.

Poor kid steals a candy bar in some places and gets the book thrown at him. 

Technically, there was no 'victim' in the scam she and others engaged in.  (Personally, I don't buy that as there WERE other victims...  the kids denied entrance because her and others kids gamed the system and got in.)

As to that kid, he got caught in the state legal system as opposed to the federal system.  Different rules.

I would think at least 90 days in jail and 2 years probation should have been in order for this cheat. 

Federal sentencing guidelines.  

Plus, the judge I believe was sending a message to others, like Lori Laughlin, that FH pled guilty and she got this.   Lori is very likely now cleaning the shit out of her panties knowing she'll be doing much, much more. 

 
 
 
Jack_TX
1.2.1  Jack_TX  replied to  XDm9mm @1.2    one month ago
(Personally, I don't buy that as there WERE other victims...  the kids denied entrance because her and others kids gamed the system and got in.)

Ding!  Got it in one.

Civil lawsuits to commence shortly after the criminal situation is settled.

 
 
 
Kathleen
1.2.2  Kathleen  replied to  XDm9mm @1.2    one month ago

Agreed,  Lori should have pleaded guilty also. Her arrogance will land her much more time if she is found guilty.  She also has done more wrong then the one that just got sentenced.  

I was hoping for 6 months prison time. 14 days are nothing.

Lori should get at least 5 years. Plus a million dollar fine, probation for 5 years and community service. Then maybe she won’t be so high and mighty.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.2.3  XDm9mm  replied to  Jack_TX @1.2.1    one month ago
Civil lawsuits to commence shortly after the criminal situation is settled.

If I'm not mistaken, I believe they already have.  Not 100% positive, but close to it.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.2.4  XDm9mm  replied to  Kathleen @1.2.2    one month ago
Agreed,  Lori should have pleaded guilty also. Her arrogance will land her much more time if she is found guilty.  She also has done more wrong then the one that just got sentenced.  

LL will be doing more time, much, much more time if she's found guilty.  She and hubby actually bribed people as opposed to just having the kids SAT scores modified.  LL and hubby doled out I believe $500k to buy their brats way into college.

I was hoping for 6 months prison time.

Actually, I would have preferred 30 days.  She was pretty much alone in immediately admitting guilt and accepting that what she did was wrong.  She accepted that she screwed up and never, unlike LL, played up to the cameras when she went to court.  She covered up and actually looked ashamed for what she did.

 
 
 
Kathleen
1.2.5  Kathleen  replied to  XDm9mm @1.2.4    one month ago

I must be a tougher judge. : )

 
 
 
KDMichigan
1.3  KDMichigan  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one month ago
If you are wealthy and "famous" you get 14 days. 

I think she should have got more time for being a typical liberal hypocrite.

Isn't she one of the Hollywood anti trumpers?

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.3.1  XDm9mm  replied to  KDMichigan @1.3    one month ago
Isn't she one of the Hollywood anti trumpers?

You even had to ask that?   Unless they're 'in the closet', you can count Hollywood Trump supporters on one hand.

 
 
 
KDMichigan
1.3.2  KDMichigan  replied to  XDm9mm @1.3.1    one month ago
You even had to ask that?

jrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gif You know it was rhetorical.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.3.3  XDm9mm  replied to  KDMichigan @1.3.2    one month ago
You know it was rhetorical.

Oh, believe me, I know.  But one needs to realize that there are some here that are not as enlightened and cognizant of reality as you are.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
1.4  Greg Jones  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one month ago

This was a victimless crime, she didn't hurt or kill anyone. Probation and fine is enough. Probably get time served.

Comey only got a slap on the wrist.

Hillary was never even charged at all for leaking secrets to Russia.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.4.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Greg Jones @1.4    one month ago

If there was a bottomless list of accepted applicants to these colleges you would have a slight point, but there isnt. 

She paid someone to cheat for her on a competitive test that determines who gets something (a spot at that college).

Although I tend to agree this is a small crime, America never takes white collar crime seriously. Corruption is not at all uncommon. 

 
 
 
Jack_TX
1.4.2  Jack_TX  replied to  JohnRussell @1.4.1    one month ago
If there was a bottomless list of accepted applicants to these colleges you would have a slight point, but there isnt.  She paid someone to cheat for her on a competitive test that determines who gets something (a spot at that college).

Wasn't this all discovered and reversed before her kids actually went to college?  Could be wrong, but I thought her kids were younger than most of the others in this thing.

 
 
 
TTGA
1.5  TTGA  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one month ago
If you are wealthy and "famous" you get 14 days.

Very true John.  I've seen people do more time than that for reckless driving.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
2  seeder  JohnRussell    one month ago

I think 90 days is the shortest "serious" sentence. 2 weeks in a minimum security prison is the blink of an eye. She'll probably spend it writing a magazine article about her ordeal.

 
 
 
Jack_TX
2.1  Jack_TX  replied to  JohnRussell @2    one month ago

She'll probably spend it trying to avoid being assaulted.

 
 
 
MUVA
2.2  MUVA  replied to  JohnRussell @2    one month ago

They will probably send her home after a couple days under Mansion arrest.

 
 
 
Tacos!
3  Tacos!    one month ago

Seems reasonable enough and the judge backed it up with some pretty solid reasoning. I think if the corruption weren't so widespread, she might not have received any time at all, but there seems to be a genuine need for a sentence that serves as a deterrent to others.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.1  XDm9mm  replied to  Tacos! @3    one month ago
sentence that serves as a deterrent to others.

I believe it was sending a message to others to either accept plea deals, or get their affairs in order for some serious time if they've pled not-guilty and are later found guilty as they will be doing real time.

Basically they were told to get their shit together and not waste the courts time when they know they're guilty.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
4  seeder  JohnRussell    one month ago

Crystal Mason Reacts To Felicity Huffman’s 14-Day Prison Sentence

Mason faces five years in prison for casting a provisional ballot in the 2016 election.
Mason was convicted of illegal voting after casting a provisional ballot in 2016 while on supervised release for a federal felony, but says she didn’t know she was ineligible to vote. Even though the ballot was rejected, Tarrant County District Attorney Sharen Wilson (R) still brought charges against her and successfully convinced a judge that Mason was guilty of illegal voting. During the sentencing phase of her trial, Matthew Smid, the prosecutor in her case highlighted Mason’s previous criminal record and said it was clear Mason had “no regard for the law.” When she was charged with illegally voting, Mason had gone back to school, gotten a job and pledged to her children that she would never go back to prison again.
 
 
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