George Conway's Monumental And Devastating Takedown Of Donald Trump, The Man

  
By:  john-russell  •  one month ago  •  104 comments

George Conway's Monumental And Devastating Takedown Of Donald Trump, The Man

George Conway , husband of the alternative facts queen Kellyanne, has a new article on Trump and he lowers the boom with a smack down of epic proportions. 

It is a good half hours worth of material, which I am posting some of below. 

Here is a small portion


 In July, he described himself in a  tweet  as “so great looking and smart, a true Stable Genius!” (Exclamation point his, of course.) That “ stable genius ” self-description is one that Trump has repeated  over  and  over  again—even though he has  trouble  with  spelling doesn’t know the difference  between a hyphen and an apostrophe,  doesn’t appear to understand fractions , needs basic  geography lessons speaks at the level   of a fourth grader , and  engages in “serial misuse of public language” and “cannot write sentences,”  and even though members of  his own administration  have variously considered him to be a “moron,” an “idiot,” a “dope,” “dumb as shit,” and a person with the intelligence of a “kindergartener” or a “fifth or sixth grader” or an “11-year-old child.”

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1  author  JohnRussell    one month ago

There is quite a bit more at the link

https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/10/george-conway-trump-unfit-office/599128/

...Even Trump’s own allies recognize the degree of his narcissism. When he launched racist attacks on four congresswomen of color, Senator Lindsey Graham  explained , “That’s just the way he is. It’s more narcissism than anything else.” So, too, do skeptics of assigning a clinical diagnosis. “No one is denying,” Frances  told   Rolling Stone , “that he is as narcissistic an individual as one is ever likely to encounter.” The president’s exceptional narcissism is his defining characteristic—and understanding that is crucial to evaluating his fitness for office.

The  DSM-5  describes its conception of pathological narcissism this way: “The essential feature of narcissistic personality disorder is a pervasive pattern of grandiosity, need for admiration, and lack of empathy that begins by early adulthood and is present in a variety of contexts.” The manual sets out nine diagnostic criteria that are indicative of the disorder, but only five of the nine need be present for a diagnosis of NPD to be made. Here are the nine:

1. Has a grandiose sense of self-importance (e.g., exaggerates achievements and talents, expects to be recognized as superior without commensurate achievements).

2. Is preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal love.

3. Believes that he or she is “special” and unique and can only be understood by, or should associate with, other special or high-status people (or institutions).

4. Requires excessive admiration.

5. Has a sense of entitlement (i.e., unreasonable expectations of especially favorable treatment or automatic compliance with his or her expectations).

6. Is interpersonally exploitative (i.e., takes advantage of others to achieve his or her own ends)

7. Lacks empathy: is unwilling to recognize or identify with the feelings or needs of others.

8. Is often envious of others or believes that others are envious of him or her.

9. Shows arrogant, haughty behaviors or attitudes.

These criteria are accompanied by explanatory notes that seem relevant here: “Vulnerability in self-esteem makes individuals with narcissistic personality disorder very sensitive to ‘injury’ from criticism or defeat.” And “criticism may haunt these individuals and may leave them feeling humiliated, degraded, hollow and empty. They may react with disdain, rage, or defiant counterattack.” The manual warns, moreover, that “interpersonal relations are typically impaired because of problems derived from entitlement, the need for admiration, and the relative disregard for the sensitivities of others.” And, the  DSM-5  adds, “though overweening ambition and confidence may lead to high achievement, performance may be disrupted because of intolerance of criticism or defeat.”

The diagnostic criteria offer a useful framework for understanding the most remarkable features of Donald Trump’s personality, and of his presidency.  (1) Exaggerates achievements and talents, expects to be recognized as superior without commensurate achievements ? ( 2) Preoccupied with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance (3) Believes that he or she is “special” and unique and should only associate with other special or high-status people?  That’s Trump, to a T. As Trump himself might put it, he exaggerates accomplishments better than anyone. In July, he described himself in a  tweet  as “so great looking and smart, a true Stable Genius!” (Exclamation point his, of course.) That “ stable genius ” self-description is one that Trump has repeated  over  and  over  again—even though he has  trouble  with  spelling doesn’t know the difference  between a hyphen and an apostrophe,  doesn’t appear to understand fractions , needs basic  geography lessons speaks at the level   of a fourth grader , and  engages in “serial misuse of public language” and “cannot write sentences,”  and even though members of  his own administration  have variously considered him to be a “moron,” an “idiot,” a “dope,” “dumb as shit,” and a person with the intelligence of a “kindergartener” or a “fifth or sixth grader” or an “11-year-old child.”

Trump  wants everyone to know : He’s “the super genius of all time,” one of “the smartest people anywhere in the world.” Not only that, but he considers himself a hero of sorts. He  avoided military service , yet  claims  he would have run, unarmed, into a school during a mass shooting. Speaking to a group of emergency medical workers who had lost friends and colleagues on 9/11,  he claimed, falsely,  to have “spent a lot of time down there with you,” while generously allowing that “I’m not considering myself a first responder.” He has spoken, perhaps jokingly, perhaps not, about  awarding himself  the Medal of Honor.

Trump claims to be an expert—the world’s greatest—in anything and everything. As one  video mash-up shows , Trump has at various times claimed—in all seriousness—that no one knows more than he does about: taxes, income, construction, campaign finance, drones, technology, infrastructure, work visas, the Islamic State, “things” generally, environmental-impact statements, Facebook, renewable energy, polls, courts, steelworkers, golf, banks, trade, nuclear weapons, tax law, lawsuits, currency devaluation, money, “the system,” debt, and politicians. Trump described his admission as a transfer student into Wharton’s undergraduate program as “ super genius stuff ,” even though he didn’t strike the admissions officer who approved his candidacy as a “genius,” let alone a “super genius”; Trump  claimed to have  “heard I was first in my class” at Wharton, despite the fact that  his name didn’t appear  on the dean’s list there, or in the commencement program’s list of graduates  receiving honors . And Trump, through an invented spokesman, even  lied his way  onto the  Forbes  400.

(4) Requires excessive admiration ? Last Thanksgiving, Trump was asked what he was most thankful for. His answer:  himself , of course. A number of years ago, he made a video for  Forbes  in which  he interviewed two of his children . The interview topic:  how great they thought Donald Trump  was. When his own father died, in 1999, Trump gave one of the eulogies. As Alan Marcus, a former Trump adviser, recounted the story to  Timothy O’Brien , he began “more or less like this: ‘I was in my Trump Tower apartment reading about how I was having the greatest year in my career in  The New York Times  when the security desk called to say my brother Robert was coming upstairs’”—an introductory line that provoked “‘an audible gasp’ from mourners stunned by Trump’s self-regard.” According to a  Rolling Stone  article , other eulogists spoke about the deceased, but Trump “used the time to talk about his own accomplishments and to make it clear that, in his mind, his father’s best achievement was producing him, Donald.” The author of a book about the Trump family  described the funeral  as one that “wasn’t about Fred Trump,” but rather “was an opportunity to do some brand burnishing by Donald, for Donald. Throughout his remarks, the first-person singular pronouns—I and me and mine—far outnumbered he and his. Even at his own father’s funeral, Donald Trump couldn’t cede the limelight.”

And he still can’t. Here’s a man who holds rallies with no elections in sight, so that he can bask in his supporters’ cheers; even when elections are near, and he’s supposed to be helping other candidates, he consistently keeps the focus on himself. He loves to  watch replays  of himself at the rallies, and “ luxuriates in the moments he believes are evidence of his brilliance .” In July, after his controversial, publicly funded, campaign-style Independence Day  celebration , Trump  tweeted , “Our Country is the envy of the World. Thank you, Mr. President!” In February 2017, Trump was given a private tour of the newly opened National Museum of African American History and Culture, and paused in front of an exhibit on the Dutch role in the slave trade. He turned to the museum’s director  and said , “You know, they love me in the Netherlands.”

(5) A sense of entitlement (9) Arrogant, haughty behaviors ? Trump is the man who, on the infamous  Access Hollywood   tape, said, “When you’re a star, they let you do it. You can do anything you want”—including grabbing women by their genitals. He’s the man who also once  said , “I could stand in the middle of Fifth Avenue and shoot somebody and I wouldn’t lose any voters.”  (8) Envious of others ? Here’s a man so unable to stand the praise received by a respected war hero and statesman, Senator John McCain, that he  has continued to attack McCain   months after McCain’s death ; his jealousy led White House staff  to direct the Pentagon  to keep a destroyer called the USS John S. McCain out of Trump’s line of sight during a presidential visit to an American naval base in Japan. And Trump, despite being president, still seems  envious of President Barack Obama (6) Interpersonally exploitative ? Just watch the  Access Hollywood  tape, or ask any of the  hundreds of contractors and employees  Trump the businessman allegedly stiffed, or speak with any of the  two dozen women  who have accused Trump of sexual misconduct, sexual assault, or rape. (Trump has denied all their claims.)

Finally,  (7) Lacks empathy: is unwilling to recognize or identify with the feelings or needs of others ? One of the most striking aspects of Trump’s personality is his utter and complete lack of empathy. By  empathy , psychologists and psychiatrists mean the ability to understand or relate to what someone else is experiencing—the capacity to envision someone else’s feelings, perceptions, and thoughts.

The notorious lawyer and fixer Roy Cohn, who once counseled Trump,  said  that “Donald pisses ice water,” and indeed, examples of Trump’s utter lack of normal human empathy abound.  Trump himself   has told   the story  of a charity ball—an “incredible ball”—he once held at Mar-a-Lago for the Red Cross. “So what happens is, this guy falls off right on his face, hits his head, and I thought he died … His wife is screaming—she’s sitting right next to him, and she’s screaming.” By his  own  account, Trump’s concern wasn’t the poor man’s well-being or his wife’s. It was the bloody mess on his expensive floor. “You know, beautiful marble floor, didn’t look like it. It changed color. Became very red … I said, ‘Oh, my God, that’s disgusting,’ and I turned away. I couldn’t, you know, he was right in front of me and I turned away.” Trump describes himself as saying, after the injured man was hauled away on a makeshift stretcher, “‘Get that blood cleaned up! It’s disgusting!’ The next day, I forgot to call [the man] to say is he okay … It’s just not my thing.”

And then there was 9/11. Trump gave  an extraordinary call-in interview  to a metropolitan–New York television station just hours after the Twin Towers collapsed. He was asked whether one of his downtown buildings, 40 Wall Street, had suffered any damage. Trump’s  immediate response  was to brag about the building’s brand-new ranking among New York skyscrapers: “40 Wall Street actually was the second-tallest building in downtown Manhattan, and it was actually, before the World Trade Center, was the tallest—and then when they built the World Trade Center, it became known as the second-tallest. And now it’s the tallest . ” (This  wasn’t even true —a building a block away from Trump’s, 70 Pine Street, was a little taller.)

That human empathy isn’t Trump’s thing has been demonstrated time and again during his presidency as well. In October 2017,  he reportedly told the widow of a serviceman killed in action  “something to the effect that ‘he knew what he was getting into when he signed up, but I guess it hurts anyway.’” (Trump later  claimed  that this account was “fabricated … Sad!” and that “I have proof,” but of course he never produced any.) On a less macabre note, on Christmas Eve last year, Trump took calls on NORAD’s Santa Tracker phone line, which children call to find out where Santa Claus is as he makes his rounds. Trump  asked a 7-year-old girl  from South Carolina: “Are you still a believer in Santa? Because at 7, it’s marginal, right?”

According to Woodward’s  Fear , when Trump’s first chief of staff, Reince Priebus, resigned, he found out about his replacement when he saw a tweet from Trump saying that he had appointed John Kelly as the new chief of staff—moments after Priebus and Trump had spoken about waiting to announce the news. Kelly was appalled, and that night apologetically told Priebus, “I’d never do this to you. I’d never been offered this job until the tweet came out. I would have told you.” His predecessor, though, wasn’t surprised. “It made no sense, Priebus realized, unless you understood … ‘The president has zero psychological ability to recognize empathy or pity in any way.’”

Priebus apparently isn’t the only White House staffer to have learned this; in February 2018, when Trump met with survivors of the Parkland, Florida, school shooting and their loved ones, his communications aide actually  gave him a note card  that made clear that “the president needed to be reminded to show compassion and understanding to traumatized survivors,” as  The New York Times  put it. The empathy cheat sheet contained a reminder to say such things as “I hear you.” One aide to President Obama told the  Times  that had she and her colleagues given their boss such a reminder card, “he would have looked at us like we were crazy people.”

Most recently, in July of this year, in a  stunning scene captured on video , Trump  met in the Oval Office  with the human-rights activist Nadia Murad, a Yazidi Iraqi who had been captured, raped, and tortured by the Islamic State, and had won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2018 for speaking out about the plight of the Yazidis and other victims of genocide and religious persecution. Her voice breaking, she implored the president of the United States to help her people return safely to Iraq. Trump could barely look her in the eye. She told him that ISIS had murdered her mother and six brothers. Trump, apparently not paying much attention, asked, “Where are they now?” “They killed them,” she said once again. “They are in the mass grave in Sinjar, and I’m still fighting just to live in safety.” Trump, who has  publicly said  that he deserves the Nobel Peace Prize, seemed interested in the conversation only at the end, when he asked Murad about why she won the prize.

Another equally unforgettable video documents Trump visiting Puerto Rico shortly after Hurricane Maria,  tossing rolls of paper towels  into a crowd of victims. He later  responded vindictively  to charges that his administration hadn’t done enough to help the island, prompting the mayor of San Juan to observe that Trump had “augmented” Puerto Rico’s “devastating human crisis … because he made it about himself, not about saving our lives,” and because “when expected to show empathy he showed disdain and lack of respect.”

In October 2018, a gunman burst into Shabbat morning services at a Jewish synagogue in Pittsburgh and sprayed worshipers with semiautomatic-rifle and pistol fire. Eleven people died. Three days later, the president and first lady visited the community, and the day after that,  the first thing Trump tweeted  about the visit was this: “Melania and I were treated very nicely yesterday in Pittsburgh. The Office of the President was shown great respect on a very sad & solemn day. We were treated so warmly. Small protest was not seen by us, staged far away. The Fake News stories were just the opposite—Disgraceful!” Similarly, after gunmen killed dozens in the span of a single August weekend in Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, Trump went on a one-day sympathy tour that was marked by  attacks on his hosts  and  on political enemies , and an  obsessive focus on himself .

What kind of human being, let alone politician, would engage in such unempathetic, self-centered behavior while memorializing such horrible tragedies? Only the most narcissistic person imaginable—or a person whose narcissism would be difficult to imagine if we hadn’t seen it ourselves. The evidence of Trump’s narcissism is overwhelming—indeed, it would be a gargantuan task to try to marshal all of it, especially as it mounts each and every day.

Yet pathological narcissism is not the only personality disorder that Trump’s behavior clearly indicates. A second disorder also frequently ascribed to Trump by professionals is sociopathy—what the  DSM-5  calls antisocial personality disorder.  As described by  Lance Dodes, a former assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, “sociopathy is among the most severe mental disturbances.” Central to sociopathy is a complete lack of empathy—along with “an absence of guilt.” Sociopaths engage in “intentional manipulation, and controlling or even sadistically harming others for personal power or gratification. People with sociopathic traits have a flaw in the basic nature of human beings … They are lacking an essential part of being human.” For its part, the  DSM-5  states that the “essential feature of antisocial personality disorder is a pervasive pattern of disregard for, and violation of, the rights of others that begins in childhood or early adolescence and continues into adulthood.”

The question of whether Trump can serve as a national fiduciary turns more on his narcissistic tendencies than his sociopathic ones, but Trump’s sociopathic characteristics sufficiently intertwine with his narcissistic ones that they deserve mention here. These include, to quote the  DSM-5 , “deceitfulness, as indicated by repeated lying, use of aliases, or conning others.” Trump’s deceitfulness—his lying—has become the stuff of legend; journalists track his “false and misleading claims” as president by the  thousands  upon  thousands . Aliases? For years,  Trump would call journalists  while posing as imaginary PR men, “John Barron” and “John Miller,” so that  he could plant false stories  about being wealthy, brilliant, and  sexually accomplished . Trump was, and remains, a con artist: Think of  Trump University , which even Trump’s  own employees  described as a scam (and which sparked a lawsuit that resulted in a $25 million settlement, although with no admission of wrongdoing). There’s  ACN , an alleged Ponzi scheme Trump promoted, and from which  he made millions (he, his company, and his family deny the allegations of fraud) ; and the border wall that  hasn’t been built  and that Mexico’s never going to pay for. Trump is a pathological liar if ever there was one.
Other criteria for antisocial personality disorder include “failure to conform to social norms with respect to lawful behaviors, as indicated by repeatedly performing acts that are grounds for arrest”; “impulsivity or failure to plan ahead”; and “lack of remorse, as indicated by being indifferent to or rationalizing having hurt, mistreated, or stolen from another.” Check, check, and check: As for social norms and lawful behaviors, there are all the accusations of sexual misconduct. Also relevant is what the  Mueller report  says about Trump’s efforts to derail the Justice Department’s investigation into Russian interference in the last presidential election. And given what federal prosecutors in New York said about his role in  directing hush money  to be paid to the porn star Stormy Daniels, a strong case can be made that Trump has committed multiple acts of  obstruction of justice  and  criminal violations of campaign-finance laws . Were he not president, and were it not for two  Justice Department opinions  holding that a sitting president  cannot be indicted , he might well be  facing  criminal charges  now .

As for impulsivity, that essentially describes what gets him into trouble most: It was his “ impulsiveness—actually, total recklessness ”—that came close to destroying him in the 1980s. In “response to his surging celebrity,” Trump, “acquisitive to the point of recklessness,” engaged in “a series of manic, ill-advised ventures” that “nearly did him in,”  Politico  reported . His impulsiveness has buffeted his presidency as well: Think of his first ordering, then calling off,  the bombing of Iran  in June, and his aborted  meeting with the Taliban at Camp David  just last month. And remember the  racist   tweets   he sent  in mid-July in which he told four nonwhite representatives—three of whom were born in the United States—to “go back” to the “countries” they “originally came from.” Those tweets were  apparently triggered  by something he saw on TV.

Or consider his impetuous, unvetted personnel decisions, such as his failed selection of  Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson, the former White House physician,  as Veterans Affairs secretary, and  his choice of Representative John Ratcliffe  as director of national intelligence. It was just so on  The Apprentice , where editors and producers found that “Trump was frequently unprepared” for tapings, and  frequently fired strong contestants “on a whim,”  which required them “to ‘reverse engineer’ the episode, scouring hundreds of hours of footage … in an attempt to assemble an artificial version of history in which Trump’s shoot-from-the-hip decision made sense.” One editor remarked that he found “it strangely validating that they’re doing the same thing in the White House.” Trump sees none of this as a problem; to the contrary, he prides himself on following his instincts,  once telling an interviewer : “I have a gut, and my gut tells me more sometimes than anybody’s brain can ever tell me.”

And lack of remorse? That’s a hallmark of sociopathy, and goes hand in hand with a lack of human conscience. In a narcissistic sociopath, it’s intertwined with a lack of empathy. Trump hardly ever shows remorse, or apologizes, for anything. The one exception: With his presidential candidacy on the line in early October 2016, Trump  expressed regret  for the  Access Hollywood  video. But within weeks, almost as soon as the campaign was over, Trump  began claiming , to multiple people, that the video may have been doctored—a preposterous lie, especially since he had acknowledged that the voice was his, others had confirmed this as well, and there was no evidence of tampering. “We don’t think that was my voice,” he said to a senator. The “we,” no doubt, was a lie as well.
Again, as with his narcissism, all this evidence of Trump’s sociopathy only begins to tell the tale. The bottom line is that this is a man who,  over  and  over  and  over  again, has indifferently mused about the possibility of killing 10 million or so people in Afghanistan to end the war there, while allowing that “I’m not looking to kill 10 million people”—as though this were a realistic but merely less preferred option than, say, raising import tariffs on chewing gum. As a  1997 profile  of Trump in  The New Yorker  put it, Trump has “an existence unmolested by the rumbling of a soul.”

In a way, Trump’s sociopathic tendencies are simply an extension of his extreme narcissism. Take the pathological lying. Extreme narcissists aren’t necessarily pathological liars, but they can be, and when they are, the lying supports the narcissism. As Lance Dodes has  put it , “People like Donald Trump who have severe narcissistic disturbances can’t tolerate being criticized, so the more they are challenged in this essential way, the more out of control they become.” In particular, “They change reality to suit themselves in their own mind.” Although Trump “lies because of his sociopathic tendencies,” telling falsehoods to fool others, Dodes argues, he also lies to himself, to protect himself from narcissistic injury. And so Donald Trump has lied about  his net worth , the  size of the crowd  at his inauguration, and supposed  voter fraud  in the 2016 election.

The  latter kind  of lying, Dodes says, “is in a way more serious,” because it can indicate “a loose grip on reality”—and it may well tell us where Trump is headed in the face of impeachment hearings. Lying to prevent narcissistic injury  can metastasize  to a more significant loss of touch with reality. As Craig Malkin  puts it , when pathological narcissists “can’t let go of their need to be admired or recognized, they have to bend or invent a reality in which they remain special,” and they “can lose touch with reality in subtle ways that become extremely dangerous over time.” They can become “dangerously psychotic,” and “it’s just not always obvious until it’s too late.”

Experts haven’t suggested that Trump is psychotic, but many have contended that his narcissism and sociopathy are so inordinate that he fits the bill for “ malignant narcissism .”  Malignant narcissism  isn’t  recognized as  an official diagnosis; it’s a descriptive term coined by the psychoanalyst Erich Fromm, and expanded upon by another psychoanalyst, Otto Kernberg, to refer to an extreme mix of narcissism and sociopathy, with a degree of paranoia and sadism mixed in. One psychoanalyst  explains that  “the malignant narcissist is pathologically grandiose, lacking in conscience and behavioural regulation with characteristic demonstrations of joyful cruelty and sadism.” In the view of some in the mental-health community, such as  John Gartner , Trump “exhibits all four” components of malignant narcissism: “narcissism, paranoia, antisocial personality and sadism.”

Mental-health professionals have raised a variety of other concerns about Trump’s mental state; the last worth specifically mentioning here is the possibility that, apart from any personality disorder, he may be suffering  cognitive decline . This is a serious matter: Trump seems to be continually  slurring words , and recently misread teleprompters to say that the Continental Army  secured airports  during the American Revolutionary War, and to say that the shooting in Dayton had  occurred in Toledo.  His overall level of articulateness today doesn’t come close to what he exhibits in  decades-old television  clips. But that could be caused by ordinary age-related decline, stress, or other factors; to know whether something else is going on,  according to experts , would require a full neuropsychological work-up, of the kind that Trump hasn’t yet had and, one supposes, isn’t about to agree to.

But even that doesn’t exhaust all the mental-health issues possibly indicated by Trump’s behavior. His “mental state,” according to Justin A. Frank, a former clinical professor of psychiatry and physician who wrote a  book  about Trump’s psychology, “include[s] so many psychic afflictions” that a “working knowledge of psychiatric disorders is essential to understanding Trump.” Indeed, as Gartner puts it: “There are  a lot  of things wrong with him—and, together, they are a scary witch’s brew.”

This is a lot to digest. It would take entire books to catalog all of Trump’s behavioral abnormalities and try to explain them—some of which have  already  been  written . But when you line up what the Framers expected of a president with all that we know about Donald Trump, his unfitness becomes obvious. The question is whether he can possibly act as a public fiduciary for the nation’s highest public trust. To borrow from the  Harvard Law Review  article , can he follow the “proscriptions against profit, bad faith, and self-dealing,” manifest “a strong concern about avoiding ultra vires action” (that is, action exceeding the president’s legal authority), and maintain “a duty of diligence and carefulness”? Given that Trump displays the extreme behavioral characteristics of a pathological narcissist, a sociopath, or a malignant narcissist—take your pick—it’s clear that he can’t.

To act as a fiduciary requires you to put someone else’s interests above your own, and Trump’s personality makes it impossible for him to do that. No president before him, at least in recent memory, has ever displayed such obsessive self-regard. For Trump, Trump always comes first. He places his interests over everyone else’s—including those of the nation whose laws he swore to faithfully execute. That’s not consistent with the duties of the president, whether considered from the standpoint of constitutional law or psychology.

Indeed, Trump’s view of his presidential powers can only be described as profoundly narcissistic, and his narcissism has compelled him to disregard the Framers’ vision of his constitutional duties in every respect.  Bad faith ? Trump has repeatedly used executive powers, threatened to use executive powers, or expressed the view that executive powers should be used to advance his personal interests and punish his political opponents. Thus, for example, he has placed  restrictions on disaster aid  to Puerto Rico in apparent response to criticism of him and his administration;  directed the Pentagon to reconsider  whether to award a $10 billion contract to Amazon because its CEO owns  The Washington Post , whose coverage he doesn’t like;  threatened to take “regulatory and legislative” action  against Facebook, Google, and Twitter, because of their supposed “terrible bias” against him; tried to get White House staff to tell the Justice Department  to try to block the merger  between AT&T and Time Warner in order to punish CNN for its coverage;  attacked his first attorney general  for allowing the indictment of two Republican congressmen who had supported him; and  ordered the revocation of the security clearance  of a former CIA director who had criticized him.

And now, in just the past two weeks, we’ve seen the pièce de résistance of bad faith, the one that’s brought Trump to the verge of impeachment: Trump’s efforts to use his presidential authority  to strong-arm a foreign nation , Ukraine, into digging up or concocting evidence in support of a preposterous conspiracy theory about one of his principal challengers for the presidency, former Vice President Joe Biden. As one political historian has  put it , Trump’s use of his Article II authority to pursue vendettas is “both a sign of deep insecurity … and also just a litany of abuse of power,” and something no president has done “as consistently or as viciously as Trump has.”

Profit Self-dealing ? Look at the way Trump is using the presidency to advertise his real-estate holdings—most notably and recently,  his apparent determination  to hold the next G7 summit at the Trump Doral resort in Florida.  Ultra vires ? Trump has made the outrageous claim that the Constitution gives him “ the right to do whatever I want as president .” Consistent with that view, he has  repeatedly   suggested that , by executive order, he can overturn the Fourteenth Amendment’s guarantee of birthright citizenship—an utterly  lawless assertion . His core constitutional obligations flow from Article II’s command that he faithfully execute the laws, yet he has told subordinates not to worry about violating the laws. According to one former senior administration official  quoted in  The New York Times , Trump’s “constant instinct all the time was: Just do it, and if we get sued, we get sued … Almost as if the first step is a lawsuit. I guess he thinks that because that’s how business worked for him in the private sector. But federal law is different, and there really isn’t a settling step when you break federal law.” Federal law is also different, one might add, because he’s in charge of upholding it.

Facing the approach of the 2020 election with not a single new mile of his border wall having been built, Trump,  as reported in  The Washington Post , has urged his aides to violate all manner of laws to expedite construction—environmental laws, contracting laws, constitutional limitations on the taking of private property—and “has told worried subordinates that he will pardon them of any potential wrongdoing” they commit along the way.

A duty of diligence and carefulness ? Trump is purely impulsive, and incapable of planning or serious forethought, and his compulsion for lying has enervated any capacity for thoughtful analysis he may have ever had. He apparently won’t read anything; he himself has said, in regard to briefings, that he prefers to read “as little as possible”—despite occupying what  David A. Graham calls  “one of the most demanding jobs in the world”  precisely because  its “holder is expected to consume, digest, and absorb prodigious amounts of information via reading.”

And then there’s the question of honesty. Fiduciaries must be honest. The Framers  understood , based upon the law of public officeholding in their time, that “faithful execution” of the laws requires “the absence of bad faith through honesty.” In the private realm, fiduciaries owe a duty of candor, of truth-telling; the standard of behavior was once  memorably described by the renowned jurist Benjamin Cardozo  as “not honesty alone, but the punctilio of an honor the most sensitive.” Today, in my own practice area of corporate litigation, corporate officers and directors, as fiduciaries, owe duties that  include a duty to disclose material information truthfully and completely . Trump, whose lawyers wouldn’t dare allow him to speak to the special counsel lest he make a prosecutable false statement, couldn’t pass this standard to save his life.

Trump’s incapacity affects all manner of subjects addressed by the presidency, but can be seen most acutely in foreign affairs and national security. Presidential narcissism and personal ego have frequently displaced the national interest. Today, the most obvious—and stunning—example is his conduct toward Ukraine: While trying to pressure the Ukrainian president to restart an investigation against Biden, Trump ordered the withholding of vital military aid to that country, thus weakening its ability to withstand Russian aggression and undermining the interests of the United States. But the list goes on: Last summer, in a narcissistic effort at self-aggrandizement, Trump told the Pakistani prime minister about a conversation he had with the Indian prime minister—leading India to  deny , indignantly, that any such conversation had ever taken place. Trump reportedly even  lied about trade talks with China —announcing that phone calls had occurred that  never occurred  and that the Chinese  denied took place —in an apparent attempt to pump up the stock market and take credit for it.

Trump’s penchant for vendettas also doesn’t stop at the water’s edge—American interests be damned. When confidential cables sent by the United Kingdom’s ambassador to his government were leaked, and were  revealed to contain  uncomplimentary (but obvious) observations about Trump’s ineptitude and emotional insecurity, and the dysfunction of his administration, Trump went on an extended Twitter tirade against the ambassador, calling him  “wacky” and “a very stupid guy,”  “ a pompous fool ,” and ultimately declared: “We will no longer deal with him.” When reports surfaced that Trump was interested in having the United States purchase Greenland from Denmark, and the Danish prime minister understandably described talk about such a purchase as “ an absurd discussion ” in light of Greenland’s position on the matter, Trump canceled a visit to Denmark, and then attacked the prime minister,  calling her comments “nasty” ; for good measure, he also attacked some of America’s NATO allies.

At the same time, Trump happily succumbs to flattery from America’s enemies; he received “beautiful … great letters” from North Korea’s dictator, Kim Jong Un, and therefore “ fell in love ” with him, and rewards him  with kind words and meetings  even as North Korea continues to develop new  nuclear weapons  and  delivery systems . Of Russia’s president, Vladimir Putin,  Trump once said on television: “If he says great things about me, I’m going to say great things about him.”.........

 
 
 
JohnRussell
2  author  JohnRussell    one month ago

What I have posted is pretty long, the actual full article is quite a bit longer. 

How anyone in America could read material like this and still support or vote for Donald Trump is probably the greatest mystery is American history. 

 
 
 
lady in black
2.1  lady in black  replied to  JohnRussell @2    one month ago

72091547_10214558053373431_2498024254335

 
 
 
WallyW
2.1.1  WallyW  replied to  lady in black @2.1    one month ago

More qualified than the traitorous Obama, or Hillary

 
 
 
MrFrost
2.1.2  MrFrost  replied to  WallyW @2.1.1    one month ago

More qualified than the traitorous Obama, or Hillary

Obama was in politics before he was the POTUS. Trump? Not so much and by his actions alone he clearly is in way over his head. 

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
2.1.3  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  MrFrost @2.1.2    one month ago
he clearly is in way over his head.

It's worse than that.  He's in way over his hair!

 
 
 
MrFrost
2.1.4  MrFrost  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @2.1.3    one month ago
He's in way over his hair!

Not sure a dead ferret qualifies as hair, but you aren't wrong Sis! 

 
 
 
WallyW
2.1.5  WallyW  replied to  MrFrost @2.1.2    one month ago

Obama was in politics before he was the POTUS

An unproductive partial term in the Senate doesn't qualify him to be president.

 
 
 
MrFrost
2.1.6  MrFrost  replied to  WallyW @2.1.5    one month ago

An unproductive partial term in the Senate doesn't qualify him to be president.

The vast majority of the USA disagrees with you, and from a legal standpoint, he was qualified. 

 
 
 
bugsy
2.1.7  bugsy  replied to  MrFrost @2.1.6    one month ago
and from a legal standpoint, he was qualified. 

So is Trump...What's your point?

"I like Obama better than Trump" is subjective at best. Everybody has their own opinions.

 
 
 
lady in black
2.1.8  lady in black  replied to  WallyW @2.1.1    one month ago

Nope

 
 
 
MrFrost
2.1.9  MrFrost  replied to  bugsy @2.1.7    one month ago
So is Trump...What's your point?

Wally was trying to tell us how Obama wasn't qualified and Trump is. Following a thread would have answered your question before you asked it. 

 
 
 
bugsy
2.1.10  bugsy  replied to  MrFrost @2.1.9    one month ago

 OK, you're right.

That's a first for you.

Congrats...

 
 
 
Freedom Warrior
2.1.11  Freedom Warrior  replied to  WallyW @2.1.5    one month ago

Perhaps being a community troublemaker and a lying socialist douche bag automatically qualified obumfuk for the Dem nomination.

 
 
 
Dulay
2.1.12  Dulay  replied to  Freedom Warrior @2.1.11    one month ago
Perhaps being a community troublemaker and a lying socialist douche bag automatically qualified obumfuk for the Dem nomination.

Well he was a 'community troublemaker' for the Catholic Church so there's that...

 
 
 
Freedom Warrior
2.1.13  Freedom Warrior  replied to  Dulay @2.1.12    one month ago

He spent years screwing over the Catholic Church without any guilt.  That's not a presidential qualification.

 
 
 
Dulay
2.1.14  Dulay  replied to  Freedom Warrior @2.1.13    one month ago
He spent years screwing over the Catholic Church without any guilt. 

I'd ask you to support your claim but I know it's a waste of time. 

 
 
 
Freedom Warrior
2.1.15  Freedom Warrior  replied to  Dulay @2.1.14    one month ago

This is NOT a CLAIM. This is fact.   

 
 
 
Dulay
2.1.16  Dulay  replied to  Freedom Warrior @2.1.15    one month ago

Yet you can't post any evidence to support that because you pulled it out of your nether region. 

 
 
 
Freedom Warrior
2.1.17  Freedom Warrior  replied to  Dulay @2.1.16    one month ago

I can post anything I want but I’ll get taken down, we already know that, and more appropriately, it relies predominantly on who is doing the asking. So my policy is very simple at this point, anything an enemy wants me to do, it ain’t gonna happen.

 
 
 
Dulay
2.1.18  Dulay  replied to  Freedom Warrior @2.1.17    one month ago
I can post anything I want but I’ll get taken down, we already know that,

That happens a lot when bullshit gets posted. 

 and more appropriately, it relies predominantly on who is doing the asking.

Not when you're posting facts. Now as for bullshit, ya, some let bullshit stick to NT walls, I prefer to hose it off.

 
 
 
Freedom Warrior
2.1.19  Freedom Warrior  replied to  Dulay @2.1.18    one month ago

Except  what reveals the truth about left wing azzdouchery is labeled BS. So yeah you better grab a firehose for yours.

 
 
 
Dulay
2.1.20  Dulay  replied to  Freedom Warrior @2.1.19    one month ago
Except  what reveals the truth about left wing azzdouchery is labeled BS. 

Your pretense that navel gazing is revelatory is hilarious. 

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
2.1.22  Trout Giggles  replied to  MrFrost @2.1.4    one month ago

Actually, I think the dead ferret on his head is more qualified to be POTUS

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
2.1.23  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  WallyW @2.1.5    one month ago

Being a reality show host does?

 
 
 
MrFrost
2.1.24  MrFrost  replied to  Trout Giggles @2.1.22    one month ago

Actually, I think the dead ferret on his head is more qualified to be POTUS

True, and probably speaks better English.. 

 
 
 
WallyW
2.2  WallyW  replied to  JohnRussell @2    one month ago
How anyone in America could read material like this and still support or vote for Donald Trump

Just a repeat of all the mindless and idiotic left wing lies and  propaganda. And none of it is impeachable.

Tell us why voting for Democrat be beneficial to the US. jrSmiley_26_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
JohnRussell
2.2.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  WallyW @2.2    one month ago
Just a repeat of all the mindless and idiotic left wing lies and  propaganda.

The part of the article that I posted, which is about half of the actual article in The Atlantic, contains 145 links supporting its assertions. 145.

Trump supporters have no interest in facts. 

 
 
 
MrFrost
2.2.2  MrFrost  replied to  WallyW @2.2    one month ago

Tell us why voting for Democrat be beneficial to the US.

Tell us what the last republican president did to the economy? 

To answer your question?

This...

512

 
 
 
bugsy
2.2.3  bugsy  replied to  JohnRussell @2.2.1    one month ago

You didn't answer the question. He asked you why voting for a democrat would be beneficial to the country.

Sounds like he is trying to engage in dialogue, but of course, you go straight to insults.

 
 
 
bugsy
2.2.4  bugsy  replied to  MrFrost @2.2.2    one month ago

Very easy to do when you start your term with an at the bottom economy.

 
 
 
MrFrost
2.2.5  MrFrost  replied to  bugsy @2.2.4    one month ago

Very easy to do when you start your term with an at the bottom economy.

I'll agree to a point. But it does beg the question, "which party put us at the bottom of the economy"? Wasn't dems. 

 
 
 
bugsy
2.2.6  bugsy  replied to  MrFrost @2.2.5    one month ago
Wasn't dems. 

Not completely, no. However, dems were in charge of the purse strings the years the economy started tanking. There is no defense against that.

 
 
 
Freedom Warrior
2.2.7  Freedom Warrior  replied to  MrFrost @2.2.5    one month ago

It most certainly was a byproduct of a catalyst one can lay at the altar of Democrat dumbfuckery.

 
 
 
MrFrost
2.2.8  MrFrost  replied to  bugsy @2.2.6    one month ago

Not completely, no. However, dems were in charge of the purse strings the years the economy started tanking. There is no defense against that.

If only the economy turned on a dime, which we know it doesn't. By the time the dems took over congress, the collapse was inevitable, all they could do was try to mitigate the damage. 

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
3  Sean Treacy    one month ago

This sums its up pretty well. Given the Democrats descent into ideological extremism, it's impossible to vote for them,

We hear a lot of nasty cracks from that crowd about religious conservative voters selling their souls to support Trump. Let them explain how conservative purity requires handing the country over to the left-wingers who just spent all night vowing to destroy religious freedom.

— John Hayward (@Doc_0) October 11, 2019

It's not just a religious freedom issue, either. C riticize Trump however you like, but he isn't aggressively trying to use the power of the State to forcibly remake the electorate. His most aggressive uses of executive power have been efforts to PREVENT others from doing so.

— John Hayward (@Doc_0) October 11, 2019

This is the core reason for "conserving" anything. Conservatism is not thoughtless, stubborn resistance to new ideas. It is determined resistance against the use of force to make people kneel to ideas they disagree with. It is respect for the sovereign individual.

        — John Hayward (@Doc_0)   October 11, 2019

          If you're not ready to do whatever it takes to protect the Bill of Rights, the 1st and 2nd Amendments – and that VERY CLEARLY requires defeating the Democrat candidate in 2020 by all means necessary – then in             what sense are you an American "conservative?"

— John Hayward (@Doc_0) October 11, 2019

Everyone is disgusted with the NBA kowtowing to Communist China right now. Well, there isn't much difference in principle between Beijing and the Democrats on the topic of political supremacy over religion and individual conscience. The ChiComs are more brutal and efficient.

— John Hayward (@Doc_0) October 11, 2019

All that snark about "but muh judges" reflects the same basic misunderstanding of the situation. Yes, it matters VERY MUCH to the future, indeed the very survival, of conservatism that Donald Trump has been appointing and nominating all those judges, not Hillary Clinton.

— John Hayward (@Doc_0) October 11, 2019

Our elections are binary choices. Wishing it were not so and fantasizing about third-party ideological crusades does not change that reality. Your choice in 2020 will be between totalitarianism and whoever the GOP candidate is. The Dems are making that painfully clear.

— John Hayward (@Doc_0)   October 11, 2019

But once the candidates are chosen, your choices are either using all of your conservative intellect and energy to defeat the Democrat, or endorsing the use of raw government force to inflict mortal wounds on conservatism. Defense doesn't get to sit out red-zone plays. — John Hayward (@Doc_0)   October 11, 2019
 
 
 
JohnRussell
3.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Sean Treacy @3    one month ago

[Deleted]

 
 
 
Nerm_L
4  Nerm_L    one month ago

And yet Trump the dimwit, buffoon, clown, and moron has stymied the entire press corps, career bureaucrats, gatekeepers of the intelligence community, Congress, political Washington, and foreign leaders.  Trump can change the world with a Tweet and not one of the mentally superior, politically correct elite has been able to stop Trump.

Trump has revealed that the intellectual elite controlling the world are a sham.  The real idiots have been a public that allowed themselves to be so easily misled into believing they are too stupid to live their own lives.  

 
 
 
JohnRussell
4.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Nerm_L @4    one month ago

You are admiting that Trump is the fault of Trump supporters. Without them his power would be zero. 

He hasnt  "stymied the entire press corps, career bureaucrats, gatekeepers of the intelligence community, Congress, political Washington, and foreign leaders." Most of them think he's a twisted moron. 

He has stymied 80 or 90% of Republican voters, which has allowed him to hold a hammer over the rest of the Republican party politicians. 

 
 
 
Nerm_L
4.1.1  Nerm_L  replied to  JohnRussell @4.1    one month ago
He hasnt  "stymied the entire press corps, career bureaucrats, gatekeepers of the intelligence community, Congress, political Washington, and foreign leaders." Most of them think he's a twisted moron. 

Trump is still there.  Trump is still Tweeting.  The press corps still publicizes Trump.  The news cycle really has become the Trump show.  Trump is still President of the United States; it doesn't matter what the intellectual elite think.

He has stymied 80 or 90% of Republican voters, which has allowed him to hold a hammer over the rest of the Republican party politicians. 

Voters put Trump in office.  Trump wasn't gifted the nomination by Republican insiders trying to rig the primaries.  Trump had to beat the Republican Party before he beat the Democratic Party.  

Yes, Trump was elected to be a hammer; that's the whole point.  Maybe the intellectual elite should have been paying attention instead of enjoying the coziness of their bubble.  Calling Trump stupid won't change anything; Trump beat both the Republican and Democratic Parties by being stupid.  

Trump is a hammer.  And the intellectual elite are nails.  Trump was elected to pound nails.

 
 
 
WallyW
4.1.2  WallyW  replied to  JohnRussell @4.1    one month ago

A vast majority of Republicans are neither stymied nor bamboozled.

The  Democratizes display daily what a bunch of moronic fools they are 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
4.1.3  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Nerm_L @4.1.1    one month ago

If I described your comment in an accurate way it would be considered a coc violation, so I will just smile at your "spin". 

 
 
 
WallyW
4.1.4  WallyW  replied to  JohnRussell @4.1.3    one month ago

You can't refute it logically, so out comes the snark

 
 
 
Nerm_L
4.1.5  Nerm_L  replied to  JohnRussell @4.1.3    one month ago
If I described your comment in an accurate way it would be considered a coc violation, so I will just smile at your "spin". 

Donald Trump really is the 45th President of the United States.  Everyone wants to ignore the Republican primaries.  The 2016 Republican primaries wasn't about party talking points or defending the status quo.  Trump hammered his Republican opponents.  

Trump being elected as a hammer isn't hyperbole.  Republican voters chose Trump to be the nominee because he was a hammer.  And those defending the status quo were nails.  Trump really was elected on the expectation that he would smash the status quo.  

The country may, indeed, be tired of Trump.  But that shouldn't be 'spun' into believing the country is ready to go back to the status quo.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
4.1.6  author  JohnRussell  replied to  JohnRussell @4.1.3    one month ago

[Deleted]

 
 
 
r.t..b...
4.2  r.t..b...  replied to  Nerm_L @4    one month ago
has stymied the entire press corps, career bureaucrats, gatekeepers of the intelligence community, Congress, political Washington, and foreign leaders.

These are accolades? It flies if the face of everything we should expect from our President.

He need not agree with the coverage he receives from the 'press corps', but he needs to understand it is a crucial function of the bedrock that is the First Amendment. He may throw 'career bureaucrats' under the bus as is his right, but it is also his responsibility to nominate qualified people to fill those posts. He may discount advice from the 'intelligence community', but they should at the very least be consulted if only to understand  the ramifications of his decisions. He should have a well-stated policy and work with our 'Congress and political Washington' in a sense of compromise to effect implementation of that agenda as a co-equal branch of government. He should respect our alliances with 'foreign leaders' forged decades ahead of his tenure and commit to dialogue with them in implementing policies that may effect them.

If we cannot expect these basic traits from any President, we will get what we deserve.            (case in point)

 
 
 
WallyW
4.2.1  WallyW  replied to  r.t..b... @4.2    one month ago

BS!

The press corp is almost totally against him, while several intelligence agencies were actively trying to undermine him with phony investigations

 
 
 
Nerm_L
4.2.2  Nerm_L  replied to  r.t..b... @4.2    one month ago
These are accolades? It flies if the face of everything we should expect from our President.

It flies in the face of what the public has been told to expect from a President.  The expectations haven't come from voters or the public; the expectations have been imposed on the public by the press corps, career bureaucrats, and political Washington.

If we cannot expect these basic traits from any President, we will get what we deserve.

Trump actually listened; the intellectual elite don't know how to do that.  Voters put Trump in office.  The movers and shakers were blindsided by Trump's election because they ignore voters.  And the constant whining about Trump only shows that the intellectual elite continue to disregard and ignore voters.

The whiners simply cannot accept that voters chose Trump.  Voters are supposed to do what they are told; not challenge the status quo.  The voters must be idiots if they put Trump in office.  (Of course, that means Trump has more in common with voters than do those who are whining about Trump.)

 
 
 
r.t..b...
4.2.3  r.t..b...  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.2    one month ago
The voters must be idiots if they put Trump in office.

I've never discounted his election, to the dismay of some hereabouts, but that does not diminish the fact that I have contended from his announcement coming down the escalator that he was unfit for the job. Elections do indeed have consequences, but when those consequences mean having a person with neither a comprehension for the duties involved (within the context of the framework of our established system of governance), nor a willingness to admit as much and seek wise council, perhaps we bear some responsibility for putting such a person in office, rather than defending our vote and by necessity defending a failed electee. 

 
 
 
Nerm_L
4.2.4  Nerm_L  replied to  r.t..b... @4.2.3    one month ago
I've never discounted his election, to the dismay of some hereabouts, but that does not diminish the fact that I have contended from his announcement coming down the escalator that he was unfit for the job. Elections do indeed have consequences, but when those consequences mean having a person with neither a comprehension for the duties involved (within the context of the framework of our established system of governance), nor a willingness to admit as much and seek wise council, perhaps we bear some responsibility for putting such a person in office, rather than defending our vote and by necessity defending a failed electee. 

I didn't vote for Trump.  But Trump hasn't been a surprise, either.  Political Washington and the news media have predictably engaged in the same political technocratic bullshit, as usual, and Trump, as I expected, would triple-down and reach for a bigger hammer.  Trump uses accusations as a hammer against his opponents by brazenly flaunting what he has been accused of doing.  Trump has been publicly mocking the political technocratic bullshit.  That should not be a surprise to anyone.  

Democrats have been whining about Hillary Clinton's loss.  The real question that needs answered is why was a Trump even competitive in the election?  Even if Clinton had squeaked out the win, that wouldn't have ended the apparent dissatisfaction of so many voters with the status quo.  Voters might have begun searching for someone worse than Trump.

Voters obviously wanted Trump to do what he has been doing.  That was Trump's appeal during the primaries and the general election.  The important question is why so many voters wanted to elect a Trump?

 
 
 
Freedom Warrior
4.2.5  Freedom Warrior  replied to  r.t..b... @4.2    one month ago

Quite the contrary it’s exactly what the country needed. Neocons, NeoLibs, establishment azz wipes and deep state fukwads need to be jettisoned along those supporting the status quo.

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
4.2.6  FLYNAVY1  replied to  Freedom Warrior @4.2.5    one month ago

….Say the anarchistic libertarians that care not for the experiment called "America".  By the sounds of it they, like their Messiah Trump, don't have any use for the basic premise of the US Constitution.

 
 
 
MrFrost
5  MrFrost    one month ago
4. Requires excessive admiration.

Fast forward to the 12 minute mark to watch the asskissing festival. 

 
 
 
r.t..b...
5.1  r.t..b...  replied to  MrFrost @5    one month ago
to watch

The most disgusting display I've ever seen. Simply sickening that not a one of them not only walked out but willfully participated.

 
 
 
MrFrost
5.1.1  MrFrost  replied to  r.t..b... @5.1    one month ago

My guess is that he told his staff before the presser that they must say nice things about him. Trump's ego is so big that he has literally on national TV tell people they should praise and thank him. He is mentally ill. 

 
 
 
r.t..b...
5.1.2  r.t..b...  replied to  MrFrost @5.1.1    one month ago
He is mentally ill. 

As the noose tightens, I'm afraid his reactions will become even more unhinged. Hence the recent slate of rallies, his drug of choice giving him the fix he craves.

No one has the temerity to invoke the 25th, but if he were in any position but President, say a CEO of a publicly-held company, he would be summarily removed from his position based on his behavior.  Surreal. 

 
 
 
MrFrost
5.1.3  MrFrost  replied to  r.t..b... @5.1.2    one month ago
As the noose tightens, I'm afraid his reactions will become even more unhinged.

A valid concern given the power of the office he holds. Let's hope his removal is sooner rather than later. Personally, I doubt trump will be impeached, he will resign first because that helps him protect his ego. He can say he wasn't fired, he quit. 

 
 
 
Freedom Warrior
5.1.4  Freedom Warrior  replied to  MrFrost @5.1.3    one month ago

So valid the Dem leadership cowers in fear of his shadow unable to engage in anything but phony polemics and masturbatory grandstanding.

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
5.1.5  FLYNAVY1  replied to  r.t..b... @5.1.2    one month ago

Nothing that 10cc of Chlorpromazine can't handle.

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
5.1.6  FLYNAVY1  replied to  MrFrost @5.1.3    one month ago

Truer that you know I'm afraid.  There are still some 50 tactical nuke weapons at Incirlik airbase in TURKEY.

How is that going to work out?

 
 
 
igknorantzrulz
5.1.7  igknorantzrulz  replied to  FLYNAVY1 @5.1.5    one month ago

I remember them.

Pop a pin hole in em , and it tasted like Rohm & Haas , but they could put you down.

They were almost like qua-ludes, but not quite as powerful.

Knew some people prescribed, that and thorazine, that stuff reminds me of Jack in One Flew Over

Medication Time, Nurse Ratchet 

Chief, Juicy Fruit

 
 
 
Tacos!
6  Tacos!    one month ago

I find it to be incredibly ridiculous that anyone gives a shit what George Conway has to say about anything. The simple fact that he is married to someone who works in the White House is not enough to make his opinion newsworthy.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
6.1  r.t..b...  replied to  Tacos! @6    one month ago
gives a shit what George Conway has to say

Any rebuttal to any of the contentions posited, or just shooting the messenger?

On a side note, those Conways must engage is some serious make-up sex.

 
 
 
Tacos!
6.1.1  Tacos!  replied to  r.t..b... @6.1    one month ago
Any rebuttal to any of the contentions posited, or just shooting the messenger?

Nope just shooting the messenger. In this case, it's richly deserved. And I'm not so much shooting George Conway here as the people who treat his opinion as important.

The only reason this guy gets any play in the media is because he's a liberal married to a conservative in the White House. There is no reason any of his opinions are particularly newsworthy, so there is no reason his opinion should be on the news instead of mine or yours or anyone else's. It's stupid that the media pays any attention to this guy.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
6.1.2  r.t..b...  replied to  Tacos! @6.1.1    one month ago
Nope just shooting the messenger.

Fair enough.

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
6.1.3  Thrawn 31  replied to  Tacos! @6.1.1    one month ago

What is a "perfect" phone call?   [delete,] I want to know what the criteria is.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
6.2  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Tacos! @6    one month ago

He appears to be about 20 times as intelligent as Trump.

Are you working to have Trump replaced as the GOP 2020 candidate?  If not, why not? 

 
 
 
WallyW
6.2.1  WallyW  replied to  JohnRussell @6.2    one month ago

Trump and Nikki Haley would be an unbeatable team.

 
 
 
MrFrost
6.2.2  MrFrost  replied to  WallyW @6.2.1    one month ago

Trump and Nikki Haley would be an unbeatable team.

Haley I could vote for. Trump? I would rather slam my nuts in a car door than vote for that worthless bottom feeder. 

 
 
 
Tacos!
6.2.3  Tacos!  replied to  JohnRussell @6.2    one month ago
He appears to be about 20 times as intelligent as Trump.

You might not be the best judge of that. jrSmiley_82_smiley_image.gif

Are you working to have Trump replaced as the GOP 2020 candidate?

When did that become my job?

 
 
 
Tacos!
6.2.4  Tacos!  replied to  WallyW @6.2.1    one month ago
Trump and Nikki Haley would be an unbeatable team.

I don't think she would do it. She doesn't need to do it. If she wanted to be president - and I have no particular information that she does - she would do best to wait until 2024. Her family would probably be happier, too. I know that family is a reason she's not working in the public sector right now.

 
 
 
MrFrost
6.2.5  MrFrost  replied to  Tacos! @6.2.3    one month ago
You might not be the best judge of that.

Well let's look at some facts. 

Obama graduated from Harvard law school and was an instructor there, (we can be reasonably sure that Harvard doesn't hire idiots). 

Trump graduated from Wharton where he didn't even make the top 15%.  

 
 
 
Tacos!
6.2.6  Tacos!  replied to  MrFrost @6.2.5    one month ago

OK, first of all, I was joking, hence the wink. Second, JR and I were talking about George Conway, not Obama. Third, who cares?

 
 
 
JohnRussell
6.2.7  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Tacos! @6.2.3    one month ago
You might not be the best judge of that.

It takes no special talent to see that Trump is a moron.  There is an actual record of it. 

By the way, Trump is on video saying he was first in his class at the U. of Pennsylvania Business School. 

There is no record of him being on the Dean's List or receiving any academic recognition when he graduated.   Is he lying, or merely "exaggerating" ? 

 
 
 
WallyW
6.2.8  WallyW  replied to  Tacos! @6.2.4    one month ago

Of course she wouldn't run with Trump. I'm betting she will in 2024 though.

 
 
 
Tacos!
6.2.9  Tacos!  replied to  JohnRussell @6.2.7    one month ago
It takes no special talent to see that Trump is a moron.

It's weird to me that you need this validation.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
6.2.10  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Tacos! @6.2.9    one month ago

I dont need any validation, I know what he is. Trump supporters seem to be the ones struggling with reality. 

 
 
 
MrFrost
6.2.11  MrFrost  replied to  WallyW @6.2.8    one month ago

Of course she wouldn't run with Trump. I'm betting she will in 2024 though.

And like I said, I could vote for her. Just depends on her platform and who she is running against. 

 
 
 
Tacos!
6.2.12  Tacos!  replied to  JohnRussell @6.2.10    one month ago
I dont need any validation

I think you do. You're going to a lot of effort to convince other people and try to get them to agree with you for some reason.

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
6.2.13  Thrawn 31  replied to  Tacos! @6.2.9    one month ago

Tell me, what is a "perfect" phone call?

 
 
 
MrFrost
6.3  MrFrost  replied to  Tacos! @6    one month ago
I find it to be incredibly ridiculous that anyone gives a shit what George Conway has to say about anything.

I often feel the same way about trump and his supporters. 

 
 
 
MrFrost
7  MrFrost    one month ago
that no one knows more than he does about: taxes, income, construction, campaign finance, drones, technology, infrastructure, work visas, the Islamic State, “things” generally, environmental-impact statements, Facebook, renewable energy, polls, courts, steelworkers, golf, banks, trade, nuclear weapons, tax law, lawsuits, currency devaluation, money, “the system,” debt, and politicians.

A few additions to this list:

Drones, corruption, fraud, rape, sexual assault, lying. 

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
7.1  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  MrFrost @7    one month ago

You forgot one.

 
 
 
MrFrost
8  MrFrost    one month ago

The trump administration is my favorite Martin Scorsese movie.

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
9  Thrawn 31    one month ago

The mother fucker said he had a "perfect" phone call. A few questions come to mind. 1) what the fuck is a "perfect" phone call? I am pretty sure no person in the history of humanity, until now,  has ever described a phone call as being "perfect". What is the criteria for a "perfect" phone call? 2) Who in their right mind even says some shit like that? That is like me saying " I took a perfect shit." What does that even mean? That everything slid out all at once? I didn't have to wipe? I didn't even need to flush?

What in the fuck is this guy even talking about half the time? 

Seriously, I need a Trump supporter to explain to me what a "perfect" phone call is.  

 
 
 
Dulay
9.1  Dulay  replied to  Thrawn 31 @9    one month ago

If you think listening to Trump is bad, you should go and try to READ one of his streams of consciousness. I read one 3 times and still had no fucking clue WTF he was trying to say and I KNOW neither did he. 

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
9.1.1  Thrawn 31  replied to  Dulay @9.1    one month ago

I do not listen to anything he has to say and I barely skim any of his comments for the sake of my sanity. He is the most illiterate mother fucker to ever poison our politics. I mean, we have had asshole politicians before, but at least they could form complete sentences. 

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
9.2  FLYNAVY1  replied to  Thrawn 31 @9    one month ago

"The Perfect Phone Call"

The question to the answer:  What would make his master Putin happy?

I'll take Shitstain thinking for $500 please Alec. 

 
 
 
 
Dulay
10.1  Dulay  replied to  It Is ME @10    one month ago

From the same wiki article:

However, on June 2, 2017, he announced that he declined to pursue the post.[16][17] On November 16, 2018, Conway stated that a reason he did not join the Trump administration is because it is “like a shitshow in a dumpster fire.”

Not 'disgruntled', he just saw the writing on the wall. 

 
 
 
It Is ME
10.1.1  It Is ME  replied to  Dulay @10.1    one month ago

Too late....he was already passed over !

Poor Disgruntled George !

 
 
 
Dulay
10.1.2  Dulay  replied to  It Is ME @10.1.1    one month ago

Not according to YOUR source. 

Got a source for your claim? 

 
 
 
Dulay
10.1.3  Dulay  replied to  It Is ME @10.1.1    one month ago

Oh wait! My bad, I forgot who I was replying to. 

Supporting your claims isn't your 'thing'. 

 
 
 
It Is ME
10.1.4  It Is ME  replied to  Dulay @10.1.3    one month ago
Oh wait! My bad, I forgot who I was replying to.  Supporting your claims isn't your 'thing'. 

Why pull the fake ABC, CNN, or the Adam Schiff Parody stuff ALL the time. jrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gif

As you say....."Shinny Objects" and "Equal Standards" matter ! jrSmiley_90_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
It Is ME
10.1.5  It Is ME  replied to  Dulay @10.1.2    one month ago
Got a source for your claim? 

See/Read the article your commenting on. jrSmiley_98_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Dulay
10.1.6  Dulay  replied to  It Is ME @10.1.4    one month ago
Why pull the fake ABC, CNN, or the Adam Schiff Parody stuff ALL the time.

I QUOTED for YOU source.

Are you trying to claim the YOUR quote from that article is accurate but MY quote from that article is not? 

 
 
 
It Is ME
10.1.7  It Is ME  replied to  Dulay @10.1.6    one month ago
I QUOTED for YOU source.

What does that mean ?

"Are you trying to claim the YOUR quote from that article is accurate"

No !

My "Quote" wasn't from the "Source". jrSmiley_88_smiley_image.gif

My "Quote" was from me alone. jrSmiley_80_smiley_image.gif

My "Source" notes what George was up for and didn't get !

Anything else you need to try at ?

 
 
 
Dulay
10.1.8  Dulay  replied to  It Is ME @10.1.7    one month ago
No !

My "Quote" wasn't from the "Source",

My "Quote" was from me alone.

Your quote is hyperlinked to the same wiki article I quoted from. Why lie? 

My "Source" notes what George was up for and didn't get !

Your source, the wiki article, states that George was up for multiple positions, that he didn't pursue those positions and WHY.

Anything else you need to try at ?

Why, do you have more BS you want to throw at the NT walls? 

 
 
 
It Is ME
10.1.9  It Is ME  replied to  Dulay @10.1.8    one month ago
Your quote is hyperlinked to the same wiki article I quoted from.

Your wrong !

My link was to show what George was up for yet didn't get. 

My " comment" was my own ! jrSmiley_15_smiley_image.gif

I ……. "Quoted"  . ..…. NOTHING ! jrSmiley_88_smiley_image.gif

quote verb 
\ ˈkwōt also ˈkōt 

quoted; quoting 
Definition of quote (Entry 1 of 2)
transitive verb
1
b : to repeat a passage from especially in substantiation or illustration

Duh ! jrSmiley_99_smiley_image.jpg

 
 
 
Dulay
10.1.10  Dulay  replied to  It Is ME @10.1.9    one month ago

This is a link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_T._Conway_III

This is you comment, and I QUOTE: 

George Thomas Conway III (born September 2, 1963) is an American attorney. Conway was on the short list of candidates considered by President Donald Trump for United States Solicitor General prior to the nomination in March 2017 of Noel Francisco for that position. He was subsequently considered for assistant attorney general for the Civil Division at the U.S. Department of Justice.
George is just another "Disgruntled" person in society !

Except for the last sentence, those are not your OWN words, they are QUOTED from the link I posted. 

 
 
 
It Is ME
10.1.11  It Is ME  replied to  Dulay @10.1.10    one month ago
Except for the last sentence, those are not your OWN words, they are QUOTED from the link I posted. 

So your out to prove it was the actual "Link" that had those quotes....instead of "I" quoted, like you proclaimed to the all mighty ?

Good Job in proving yourself WRONG in your comments ! jrSmiley_18_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Dulay
10.1.12  Dulay  replied to  It Is ME @10.1.11    one month ago

Obtuse. 

 
 
 
It Is ME
10.1.13  It Is ME  replied to  Dulay @10.1.12    one month ago

Astute.

 
 
 
Dulay
10.1.14  Dulay  replied to  It Is ME @10.1.13    one month ago

jrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gifjrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gifjrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gif

 
 
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