Native Tribes Are Taking Fire Control Into Their Own Hands

  
Via:  kavika  •  2 weeks ago  •  72 comments

Native Tribes Are Taking Fire Control Into Their Own Hands

Sometimes Vikki Preston is inching her way through the forest when she comes across a grove of tan oak trees that feels special. The plants are healthy, the trees are old, and their trunks are nicely spaced out on the forest floor. “You can feel that the grove has been taken care of,” she says. “There’s been a lot of love and thoughtfulness.”

Tan oak groves have long been tended by indigenous people who still live along the banks of the forested Klamath and Salmon Rivers near the California-Oregon border. Preston, a cultural resource technician for the Karuk tribe, grew up watching her grandfather tend just such a grove— by burning it . Fire helped cleared away small pines, alders, and willows. It killed pests like weevils that ruin acorns, and allowed for new, straight shoots of hazel to grow that can be used for basket-weaving. It left a forest sentineled with sugar pine and oaks, scattered with meadows full of wildflowers and ferns.

Such scenery is rare in the western US today, a result of 1911 federal legislation that made it illegal to ignite fires on public forest lands. That legislation curtailed centuries of forest management by the native Karuk, Yurok, and Hupa people, who had long lived in villages dotted throughout these forests; a 1918 US Forest Service ranger’s memo declared that “renegade Indian” fires were rooted in “pure cussedness.”


S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


NO POLITICS

Finally listening to the people that have tended this land for 10,000 years. 

Hopefully, this program will spread to other parts of CA and the west in general. 

There is another program that was started in 2015 on how the Mono Indians of the Sierra Nevada are teaching how to save and increase water supplies by taking out selected brush and trees. This program has increased water retention by 15%.

The introduction of non-native plants trees and grasses has been a disaster for our forests throughout the west and they have pushed OUT the indigenous species. This has resulted in loss of water retention, and overcrowding of the forests leading to what we are seeing today. 

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Kavika
1  seeder  Kavika     2 weeks ago

NO POLITICS

 
 
 
WallyW
1.1  WallyW  replied to  Kavika @1    2 weeks ago

The problem is made much worse by politics.

 
 
 
cobaltblue
1.1.1  cobaltblue  replied to  WallyW @1.1    2 weeks ago
The problem is made much worse by politics.

Aw jeez, Wally. You try so hard to be annoying, but you're just not that great at it. It's just silly. 

 
 
 
r.t..b...
2  r.t..b...    2 weeks ago

"Finally listening to the people that have tended this land for 10,000 years."

A knowledgeable resource that we are just now beginning to tap. Another example of good intentions leading to disastrous unintended consequences. Here's to common sense and respect for the delicate balance required to maintain an integral part of our heritage.

 
 
 
Ronin2
3  Ronin2    2 weeks ago
The introduction of non-native plants trees and grasses has been a disaster for our forests throughout the west and they have pushed OUT the indigenous species. This has resulted in loss of water retention, and overcrowding of the forests leading to what we are seeing today. 

Still too many people in CA for the water resources; but at least this is a step in the right direction since no one will ever talk about population control.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
3.1  r.t..b...  replied to  Ronin2 @3    2 weeks ago
Still too many people in CA for the water resources

A long-range problem for everyone west of the Continental Divide. I enjoy living in the desert, but realize it is unsustainable for our 4+ million residents, and am continually dumbfounded by our lack of concern. Phoenix, Las Vegas and even SoCal will look a lot different 100 years from now. The old adage is to follow the money, in these areas it should be to follow the water (one in the same I suppose).

 
 
 
1stwarrior
3.1.1  1stwarrior  replied to  r.t..b... @3.1    2 weeks ago

Follow the money - resulted in the Winter's decision which bomb blasted the rich and arrogant cattle growers and farmers in the West.  Based on the Winter's decision, numerous SCOTUS decisions sided with the tribes/nations to maintain their water resources and to propagate natural wildlife and resources.

 
 
 
MrFrost
3.1.2  MrFrost  replied to  1stwarrior @3.1.1    2 weeks ago
numerous SCOTUS decisions sided with the tribes/nations to maintain their water resources and to propagate natural wildlife and resources.

I totally agree. 

 
 
 
Kavika
3.1.3  seeder  Kavika   replied to  1stwarrior @3.1.1    2 weeks ago

And unfortunately many of the tribes are still fighting for their water rights...(Navajo/Hopi)

 
 
 
cobaltblue
3.1.4  cobaltblue  replied to  r.t..b... @3.1    2 weeks ago
will look a lot different 100 years from now.

Considering that the Yellowstone caldera is supposedly overdue for another eruption, it is still not the only caldera.

Yellowstone, it should be noted, isn't the only caldera in the United States. One of the others that's worth keeping an eye on — and the U.S. Geological Survey does just that — is the Long Valley caldera in California, near the popular ski resort of Mammoth Mountain, just east of Yosemite National Park. It erupted 700,000 years ago. A major eruption is extremely unlikely, but it could produce smaller eruptions that would be highly disruptive and dangerous, said Margaret Mangan, scientist-in-charge at the USGS California Volcano Observatory.
Mangan said there are seven volcanic regions in California with zones of molten rock beneath the surface. A volcanic eruption in California is roughly as likely as a magnitude 6 or greater earthquake on the San Andreas Fault, she said.
 
 
 
NV-Robin6
3.1.5  NV-Robin6  replied to  r.t..b... @3.1    2 weeks ago

I do not understand why are there not desalination plants all along the coast.  I also don't understand why there's not tidal power plants. 

We are smarter than this but no surprise NA wisdom is finally taking the foothold it should have always had. GO SKINS!

 
 
 
Kavika
3.1.6  seeder  Kavika   replied to  NV-Robin6 @3.1.5    2 weeks ago
I do not understand why are there not desalination plants all along the coast.

The largest desalinization plant in the western hemisphere just opened a couple of years ago in Carlsbad CA. (just north of San Diego)..

  https://www.govtech.com/fs/San-Diego-Opens-Largest-Desalination-Plant-in-Western-Hemisphere-.html

 
 
 
NV-Robin6
3.1.7  NV-Robin6  replied to  Kavika @3.1.6    2 weeks ago

I did not know this. It's a good start! Thanks for the link!

 
 
 
Kavika
3.2  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Ronin2 @3    2 weeks ago
Still too many people in CA for the water resources; but at least this is a step in the right direction since no one will ever talk about population control.

The water resources for the entire west is limited. It's not just California since one of the major contributors to water is the Colorado Rivers which supplies many western state and Mexico. The last report I read on it was that we are now taking out more water than the river can reproduce. That is a serious problem. 

Overpopulation or population control is a surly part of the solution. But that is a horse of a different color. 

 
 
 
MrFrost
4  MrFrost    2 weeks ago

Part of the problem is that most of CA. is a desert. I lived in SoCal for a couple of years when I was in the service, it rained....twice, and once was more of a heavy mist than actual rain. Not saying it's good bad or otherwise, it's just the way it is. 

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
4.1  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  MrFrost @4    2 weeks ago

Out of the 164,000 square miles, about 25,000 is desert (16%); 45 percent is forested, and the rest mountains, grassland, lakes, rivers and cities. California has both the highest point (Mt Whitney)and the lowest point (Death Valley) in the contiguous 48 states.

So you see, we have less desert than you might think.  Were you stationed at Ft. Irwin?

 
 
 
1stwarrior
4.1.1  1stwarrior  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @4.1    2 weeks ago

Paula - I "think" Frostie was/is USMC - but, I'll let him tell you his story :-).

 
 
 
Kavika
4.1.2  seeder  Kavika   replied to  1stwarrior @4.1.1    2 weeks ago

Marine/desert either Barstow or 29 Palms.

 
 
 
MrFrost
4.1.3  MrFrost  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @4.1    2 weeks ago

So you see, we have less desert than you might think.  Were you stationed at Ft. Irwin?

Pendleton. Oceanside area. 

 
 
 
MrFrost
4.1.4  MrFrost  replied to  Kavika @4.1.2    2 weeks ago

I was at 29 palms too...got my first tat there.. :) But back then, it was a wide spot in the road. 

 
 
 
MrFrost
4.1.5  MrFrost  replied to  1stwarrior @4.1.1    2 weeks ago

Paula - I "think" Frostie was/is USMC - but, I'll let him tell you his story .

Correct, U.S.M.C. (United Sanitation and Maintenance Company)

 
 
 
Kavika
4.1.6  seeder  Kavika   replied to  MrFrost @4.1.4    2 weeks ago

It's still a wide spot in the road.

 
 
 
MrFrost
4.1.7  MrFrost  replied to  Kavika @4.1.6    2 weeks ago

Is it really? Crikey, figured it would have grown some by now...30 years later. We would just drive down to Palm Springs to party on the weekends... <sigh> Lots of good memories. 

 
 
 
Kavika
4.2  seeder  Kavika   replied to  MrFrost @4    2 weeks ago

Actually the largest part of the state isn't desert at all, MrFrost. Although there is desert in the state the natural topography lends itself to wildfires. The southern part of the state is a semi-arid with long months without rain. The northern part of the state gets more rain but is still subject to wildfires. 

The wildfires are nothing new in California it's been this way for centuries. It the recent history with increased building into these area's. The change in the climate with hotter summers and less rain.

 
 
 
1stwarrior
4.2.1  1stwarrior  replied to  Kavika @4.2    2 weeks ago

Have you ever watched a Yucca or Juniper Cactus burn???  Man - talk about an inferno.

 
 
 
Kavika
4.2.2  seeder  Kavika   replied to  1stwarrior @4.2.1    2 weeks ago
Still too many people in CA for the water resources; but at least this is a step in the right direction since no one will ever talk about population control.

Yes I have and it's downright scary. I was caught in a wildfire back in the late 60's in Southern Ca. One of scariest things one could imagine. The noise is so loud that it sounds like a hundred freight trains coming straight at you. 

 
 
 
XDm9mm
5  XDm9mm    2 weeks ago

Controlled burns and logging are essential to our forests.  Without them, the forests get overgrown with good AND bad growth, leading to what we have been witnessing around the country for the last decade.

I know Florida has controlled burns and has suffered few uncontrolled wildfires due to that effort.   Maybe California and other western states should take heed and realize the folly of their ways.  They are after all their own worst enemies.

 
 
 
Split Personality
5.1  Split Personality  replied to  XDm9mm @5    2 weeks ago
Maybe California and other western states should take heed and realize the folly of their ways.  They are after all their own worst enemies.

Nonsense.

Florida ( a wet climate ) only has four national forests under USDA Forest Service and a handful of state forests.

512

California, a dry climate has much more diversity from the highest point to the lowest point in the lower 48 states.

The forests of California are plentiful, diverse and managed for many different objectives. A recently published book chapter, "Forestry" in the 2016 Ecosystems of California book, provides a detailed overview of the history and future directions of California's forests. Of the approximately 33 million acres of forest in California, federal agencies (including the USDA Forest Service and USDI Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service) own and manage 19 million acres (57%). State and local agencies including CalFire, local open space, park and water districts and land trusts own another 3%. 40% of California's forestland is owned by families, Native American tribes, or companies. Industrial timber companies own 5 million acres (14%). 9 million acres are owned by individuals  with nearly 90% of these owners having less than 50 acres of forest land.

So 57% of the Cali forests are managed by the same agencies that manage Florida.

512

California's forest management isn't the problem

Despite accusations, the state has excellent management policies—it's just also built to burn.

https://www.popsci.com/forest-management-california-fires/

 
 
 
1stwarrior
5.1.1  1stwarrior  replied to  Split Personality @5.1    2 weeks ago

Little bit of non-information will help with your comment.

I co-managed the DoD Natural/Cultural Resources (Regional Environmental Office in San Fran).  Control burns were constantly scheduled by the DoD components and the Cali counterparts would cancel them on a continuous basis.  Sadly, the DoD personnel were going to conduct the entire burn process and CalFire was only to receive our schedules and provide emergency back-up as needed.  CalFire's response was that they didn't have the funding/personnel, so the burns would either be rescheduled or cancelled.

CalFire is a bitch to work with and probably one of the worst in the CalEnv world I had to work with.

 
 
 
Kavika
5.1.2  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Split Personality @5.1    2 weeks ago

The Southern Pacific RR was the largest private landowner in California. The owned thousands and thousands of acres in the Lake Tahoe area. 

When they were purchased by the UP some of that land went up for sale. Not sure how much the UP has left but it's still sizeable. 

 
 
 
XDm9mm
5.1.3  XDm9mm  replied to  Split Personality @5.1    2 weeks ago
Nonsense. Florida ( a wet climate ) only has four national forests under USDA Forest Service and a handful of state forests.

Then tell me oh wise one, what are those areas burning during some times of the year when the fire departments are controlling and containing those burning areas they set ablaze?  Local fund raising bar-b-ques?

 
 
 
Split Personality
5.1.4  Split Personality  replied to  XDm9mm @5.1.3    2 weeks ago

In South Carolina they called them trailer fires.  It was important to let them burn hot enough to completely

vaporize the aluminum so cleanup was a minimal cost to the township or county, lol.

Maybe California and other western states should take heed and realize the folly of their ways. 

Apples to oranges comparison. 

California's diversity and the mountainous western regions can't be realistically compared to Florida. 

All of which Kav also answered 2 hours ago...

 
 
 
1stwarrior
5.2  1stwarrior  replied to  XDm9mm @5    2 weeks ago

Correct XD - true, there are only four national forests in FL.

Statewide, there are more than 17 million acres of forests; the vast majority of those timberlands are working forests. Most are privately owned; the rest is owned by state local, state, and federal governments.  I managed the forestry program at Tyndall AFB, outside of Panama City, and we had 27,000 acres of forest.  Next to us, Georgia Pacific had a forest of 138,000 acres.

All in all, the burn programs in Florida were very enthusiastically administered because we didn't want or need to become a hot bed like Georgia and Alabama with their rampant fires.  I scheduled our burns to cover 9,000 acres a year for a three year burn cycle.  Talk about being able to see clearly.  Hell, the hunting community literally fought for permission to hunt on our property due to the clearances and habitat for wildlife.

 
 
 
Kavika
5.2.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  1stwarrior @5.2    2 weeks ago

It works in Florida but the western states are not Florida, Ist. Florida is flat as a pancake something that you don't find in the western states. Rainfall and humidity are considerably higher in Florida than in California or the other western states. 

I have no problem with controlled burns, in fact, I am an advocate of them along with limited logging and extensive brush clearing.

Those are just some of the steps that need to be taken in the west.

 
 
 
1stwarrior
5.2.2  1stwarrior  replied to  Kavika @5.2.1    2 weeks ago

Now wait a minute - Florida's mountain is Sugarloaf Mountain.

Sugarloaf Mountain is the fifth-highest named point in Florida. At 312 feet above sea level it is also the highest point on the geographic Florida Peninsula. The mountain is in Lake County, near the town of Clermont. Comparatively, Florida's highest point, Britton Hill, rises to 345 feet above sea level in the Florida Panhandle. However, Sugarloaf Mountain is the most prominent point in the entire state.

 
 
 
Kavika
5.2.3  seeder  Kavika   replied to  1stwarrior @5.2.2    2 weeks ago

LOL, 345 feet...There are ant hills in Ca that are higher than that. 

 
 
 
Split Personality
5.2.4  Split Personality  replied to  Kavika @5.2.3    2 weeks ago

Texas is pretty flat, yet my phone says we are at a dizzying 620 feet, lol.

 
 
 
Kavika
5.2.5  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Split Personality @5.2.4    2 weeks ago

I think I may have to have an oxygen tank handy. Where I live in Florida is at an astounding 105 feet.

 
 
 
Split Personality
5.2.6  Split Personality  replied to  Kavika @5.2.5    2 weeks ago

My old property in SC was 14 ft  and I missed having flood insurance by 3 feet, lol.

The septic system did not work in the rain. (true story jrSmiley_86_smiley_image.gif )

 
 
 
Raven Wing
5.2.7  Raven Wing  replied to  Kavika @5.2.5    2 weeks ago
Where I live in Florida is at an astounding 105 feet.

When I first moved to Warrenton VA, everyone talked in amazement about what a big mountain the Shenandoah mountain was at a little over 4,000 ft at it's highest point. 

I looked at them in surprise, then said, "In So Calf we called those foothills. Our mountains are well over 10,000 ft and higher in some places."

Some of them looked at me with wide eyes of disbelief, and one of them said, "I guess you could call our Mountain a foothill." and laughed.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
5.2.8  sandy-2021492  replied to  Kavika @5.2.5    2 weeks ago

1309 ft, according to my phone, and I just came back from walking the dog on the ridge above my house.  I might as well train to climb Everest.

 
 
 
Kavika
5.2.9  seeder  Kavika   replied to  sandy-2021492 @5.2.8    2 weeks ago

Oxygen, where is the oxygen.jrSmiley_2_smiley_image.png

 
 
 
Kavika
5.3  seeder  Kavika   replied to  XDm9mm @5    2 weeks ago
Such scenery is rare in the western US today, a result of 1911 federal legislation that made it illegal to ignite fires on public forest lands. That legislation curtailed centuries of forest management by the native Karuk, Yurok, and Hupa people, who had long lived in villages dotted throughout these forests; a 1918 US Forest Service ranger’s memo declared that “renegade Indian” fires were rooted in “pure cussedness.”

The federal legislation in 1911 is a major contributor in the wildfires. Logging is only one part of the problem (actually there is logging in CA). In another article, I listed many of the areas that are causing the increased size and destruction. Population growth into areas that are highly prone to wildfires, with the electric companies, PG&E and SCE being the two largest by are expanding their power lines at breakneck speed and most all above ground into areas that are highly prone to wildfires. The lack of maintenance on their lines has caused massive fires (Paradise Fire last year). 

Many of the areas being affected are not suited for logging because of the type of growth. The lack of brush clearing is another area that is critical when trying to prevent wildfires. 

Of course the changing climate, hotter summer, and less rain add to the problem as well. LA hasn't seen rain in over 4 months. 

All of these things contribute to the problem, there is no one single cause or solution.

Comparing Florida to California or western states isn't a valid comparison simply due to the topography and climate of the west coast vs Florida. 

 
 
 
Kavika
6  seeder  Kavika     2 weeks ago

Since the article is about natives and how they over the centuries have used fire as a method to prevent forest fires. 

That said I would like to give a shout out to all of the Native American wildfire fighters. Most Natives will know about them but most non Natives will not be aware of the huge contribution to fighting wildfires that natives have made past and present.

Currently, the BIA  has seven (7) Hot Shot Fire Teams that work the most dangerous and the hottest fires.

(The hotshot name originated in the 1940s in California. It was used for the firefighters that fought the hottest part of the fires.)

The seven current Hot Shot teams are as follows.

In addition to the hot shot teams there are numerous other teams of Native Americans you respond at a moment notice anywhere in the country. 

One in particular that I'll mention is the ''Apache 8'' an all women firefighting team that has been in existence for 30 plus years. And much like the Hot Shot are put in the most dangerous and hottest areas of the fire. There has been a documentary done on them in 2011. 

You can bet that many of these firefighting natives are in California right now battling the fire there. 

Another shout out goes to our Indigenous brothers and sisters from Samoa. This small island has a top-notch firefighting team and last year the traveled to California to help in fighting the fires in Northern California. 

The link below is well worth reading and viewing the video.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/singing-american-samoan-firefighters-lift-spirits-in-fight-against-california-fires/

 
 
 
1stwarrior
6.1  1stwarrior  replied to  Kavika @6    2 weeks ago

Awesome info Kavika.

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
6.2  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  Kavika @6    2 weeks ago
The link below is well worth reading and viewing the video

What a fabulous group of men.

 
 
 
Kavika
6.2.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @6.2    2 weeks ago
What a fabulous group of men.

They truly are Sister. Having spent a lot of time in Samoa they are interesting people in many ways. 

 
 
 
NV-Robin6
6.2.2  NV-Robin6  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @6.2    2 weeks ago

And women!

 
 
 
NV-Robin6
6.3  NV-Robin6  replied to  Kavika @6    2 weeks ago

High 5' there! Standing ovation!

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7  Raven Wing    2 weeks ago

As I am writing this I am in a shelter with my Yoda Girl due to a mandatory evacuation of our Senior complex, from a wildfire that was moving in our direction at a pretty good pace. I brought along my laptop and my external hard drive of all my important documents backup. 

The winds are due to die down later tonight and taper off by mid morning. The fire is pretty much under control at this point, but, gusty winds an cause flare ups can still cause it to start up again.

I am hoping that Yoda Girl and I can go home tomorrow. But, we can wait and see.

 
 
 
JaneDoe
7.1  JaneDoe  replied to  Raven Wing @7    2 weeks ago

Stay safe, you and Yoda girl!!

 
 
 
Kavika
7.2  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Raven Wing @7    2 weeks ago

Please stay safe RW, and keep an eye on Yoda. I'm so sorry to hear that you had to be evacuated.  But being safe is the most important thing. 

Is that the Easy fire that is close to you?

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7.2.1  Raven Wing  replied to  Kavika @7.2    2 weeks ago
Is that the Easy fire that is close to yo

No, it's the Hill fire out in the Riverside Cty area, near Jurupa Valley off the 60 Freeway. If the winds die down over night I may be able to do home late tomorrow. Yoda is really spastic, and with the shelter being so busy with so many people and their pets, and Yoda being shut up in her carrier, which she hates, she is very traumatized. I am trying my best to comfort her, and she is calming down a little now,  But, we both want to go home. 

However, being safe is the most important thing right now.

Thank everyone for your good wishes, it is much appreciated.

 
 
 
NV-Robin6
7.3  NV-Robin6  replied to  Raven Wing @7    2 weeks ago

Thoughts are with you and all out there effected by this horrible threat. Be safe sweet Sister Raven Wing!  Looking for an update from CB too. Any one heard from him? 

 
 
 
Kavika
7.3.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  NV-Robin6 @7.3    2 weeks ago
Looking for an update from CB too. Any one heard from him? 

Is CB in the path of the fires? I wasn't aware that he lived in California.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7.3.2  Raven Wing  replied to  NV-Robin6 @7.3    2 weeks ago

Thank you Robin. I truly appreciate your good wishes and thoughts, my dear sweet Sister. jrSmiley_15_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
NV-Robin6
7.3.3  NV-Robin6  replied to  Kavika @7.3.1    2 weeks ago

Yes, he posted a few days ago in Sister Mary's seed, I believe it was. Exactly where he's at, I didn't  catch it if he posted about it. But it's in northern Cali, I took it. He said he may not be on line due to PG&E power outage mandate. 

 
 
 
NV-Robin6
7.3.4  NV-Robin6  replied to  Raven Wing @7.3.2    2 weeks ago

🤗💝

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
7.4  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  Raven Wing @7    2 weeks ago

I'm glad you are safe.  Please stay that way.  That's an order.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7.4.1  Raven Wing  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @7.4    2 weeks ago
That's an order.

Yes'em! Thank you.

 
 
 
MrFrost
7.5  MrFrost  replied to  Raven Wing @7    2 weeks ago

Just stay safe, that's the important part. 

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7.6  Raven Wing  replied to  Raven Wing @7    2 weeks ago

Yoda and I are finally back home again. Neither of us slept a wink all night and so glad to be home again. Yoda is rolling all around on the carpet and has finally dropped into her bed for a long over due nap. (grin) 

First time in the 5 years I've been here that there has been a nearby fire. Luckily I keep things simple just in case of a fire or earthquake and I need to evacuate the property. All important docs are scanned and backed up to a external drive, so all I have to do is grab the external, meds and Yoda and go. All else is material stuff, and if it's lost no big deal. 

So now we can enjoy the peace and quiet and sleep in our own beds. I think they need to turn the fire prevention commission over to the Native America Tribes here in Calif. Although, they may not be able to prevent the pyros from setting fires, the preventive clearing and conditions could be much better.

 A Mandatory evacuation is not the best way to celebrate my Birthday. jrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gif

Thank you all for your good wishes and kind thoughts for our safety. It is very much appreciated. jrSmiley_15_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Kavika
7.6.1  seeder  Kavika   replied to  Raven Wing @7.6    2 weeks ago

Welcome home and Happy Birthday.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7.6.2  Raven Wing  replied to  Kavika @7.6.1    2 weeks ago

jrSmiley_79_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Enoch
7.6.3  Enoch  replied to  Raven Wing @7.6.2    2 weeks ago

Dear Sister Raven Wing: Welcome home to you and Yoda. 

Happy birthday.

Many more.

P&AB.

Enoch

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
7.6.4  sandy-2021492  replied to  Raven Wing @7.6    2 weeks ago

Happy belated, Raven.  Glad you're home safe and comfy.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7.6.5  Raven Wing  replied to  Enoch @7.6.3    2 weeks ago

Thank you Dear Brother and Mentor Enoch. 

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7.6.6  Raven Wing  replied to  sandy-2021492 @7.6.4    2 weeks ago

Thank you sandy. It is good to be home again. 

 
 
 
charger 383
9  charger 383    2 weeks ago

Happy birthday and stay safe

 
 
 
Raven Wing
9.1  Raven Wing  replied to  charger 383 @9    2 weeks ago

Thanks Charger. (smile)

 
 
 
shona1
9.1.1  shona1  replied to  Raven Wing @9.1    2 weeks ago

A/noon Raven..glad you are both safe and now back in your home...Yes bushfires the curse of many countries, mine included. Our fire season has started early especially up in New South Wales...so it is a foreboding warning for the rest of the summer..The yearly dance with the Devil has begun once again. I detest the people who light fires on total fire ban days the most..Honestly if I saw one given the chance I think I would throw them in it...Here we refer to them as "fire bugs" as they need squashing...Keep an eye on the sky and stay safe...And Happy Birthday for the other day.....

 
 
 
Raven Wing
9.1.2  Raven Wing  replied to  shona1 @9.1.1    2 weeks ago

Thank you so much shona! We here in Calif do have a good many wildfires, but, it is something that you just can't get used to. That and along with the ground shakers (earthquakes). But, there really aren't many places in the world where weather, fires or other acts of Mother Nature make living a life of the unexpected.

Thank you for the Birthday wishes. I finally made it to 21 (big grin).

 
 
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