Second black Texas teen told by school to cut dreadlocks, according to his mom

  
Via:  perrie-halpern  •  one month ago  •  48 comments

By:   Janelle Griffith

Second black Texas teen told by school to cut dreadlocks, according to his mom
Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., who announced the first federal legislation that would ban hair-based discrimination in December, has expressed support for DeAndre and Kaden.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


A second teenager at a Texas high school was suspended and told he could not return to class until he cut his dreadlocks to be in compliance with the school's dress code.

Kaden Bradford, 16, a sophomore at Barbers Hill High School in Mont Belvieu in Southeast Texas, has been on at-home suspension since last week, according to his mother, Cindy Bradford.


Kaden's cousin, DeAndre Arnold, is a senior at the school and also wears dreadlocks. DeAndre was recently told by administrators that he is not allowed in school and cannot   walk at his graduation unless he cut his hair , his mother, Sandy Arnold, told NBC affiliate KPRC of Houston. DeAndre,   whose father is from Trinidad , said the men in his family often grow their dreadlocks, and that it is a part of his identity and culture.

200124-kaden-bradford-inline-se-117p_9dd Kaden Bradford. Courtesy Cindy Bradford

Both women, who are sisters, said they will not cut the boys' hair.

Bradford said in an interview Friday that like DeAndre, her son has worn dreadlocks for years and it only recently became an issue at the high school. Last year, Kaden would wear a headband to keep his dreadlocks off his shoulders, his mother said. The school told her that if Kaden kept his dreadlocks pulled back, he would not be in violation of its hair policy, she said.

But shortly after Christmas break, she said the school's principal, Rick Kana, told Kaden that he would need to cut his hair. Bradford said she paid last week to have Kaden's dreads cornrowed, or tightly-braided so that they lay flat against his scalp. But that did not appease administrators, who placed him on at-home suspension because he refused to cut his hair, his mother said.

She said she is now considering taking legal action so he can return to school.

Bradford said she believes the hair policy is racist. The school district   dress code   states male students cannot have their hair “gathered or worn in a style that would allow the hair to extend below” the collar, earlobes and eyes when let down.

Barbers Hill High School is predominantly white, according to   school district data . African Americans made up 3.1 percent of the school district's population in the 2017-18 school year.

The principal and Barbers Hill Independent School District superintendent, Greg Poole, did not return multiple requests for an interview.

In a statement posted on its Twitter account, the district said that it does allow dreadlocks. "However we DO have a community supported hair length policy & have had for decades," the statement said. "BH is a State leader with high expectations in ALL areas!"

On Friday, Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., who announced the   first federal legislation that would ban hair-based discrimination in December , expressed support for DeAndre and Kaden.

"Natural hair like dreadlocks is a reflection of culture & heritage," he   tweeted . "No one should be punished for expressing who they are. The CROWN Act would end this—hair discrimination is discrimination against black people."

In December, Booker said the   Create a Respectful and Open World for Natural Hair Act   (CROWN) will make it clear that "discrimination based on natural and protective hairstyles associated with people of African descent" is a "prohibited form of racial or national origin discrimination."

Houston Texans wide receiver DeAndre Hopkins, who has dreadlocks, also   tweeted   support Wednesday for DeAndre.

"Never cut your locks," Hopkins said.

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Tacos!
1  Tacos!    one month ago
Bradford said she believes the hair policy is racist. The school district   dress code   states male students cannot have their hair “gathered or worn in a style that would allow the hair to extend below” the collar, earlobes and eyes when let down.

The people there may well be racist, but I doubt very much that policy was aimed specifically at black students. It’s not as if long hair is unique to black people. I’m white and I used to have hair half way down my back. It sounds more like a socially conservative concept of neatness and modesty.

It would be nice though, if they could just rethink the policy. It’s hard to see the harm in letting a young man wear his hair long.

If anything, I think you could argue the policy is sexist if girls are allowed to wear their hair long.

 
 
 
Citizen Kane-473667
1.1  Citizen Kane-473667  replied to  Tacos! @1    one month ago

I saw this article yesterday and I admit, I laughed at the whole premise of it being "racist" in any way, shape, or form. These "hair policies" originated back in the 60's and 70's as a way to curb  the lifestyles of the "hippies ". That counter-culture movement was as far from Racist as you could get. One of the great unifiers of the movement was the Fuck "The MAN" attitude, and the long hair was a symbol of it; so much so, it was immortalized in songs that are still played today. Here's one now that I'm sure everyone recognizes . The reasons schools started these policies was ostensibly for Health Concerns because the hippies were notorious for being shall we say, a little lax in their bathing standards by American ideals. Head lice became quite a big problem for a while, so school boards banned long hair on boys.

Now to the sexist part of the policies; it is, but for a good reason. Girls tend to wash their hair, even when the counter-culture movement was in full swing. They tend to bathe more in general for that matter. Not to mention, they get really grossed out by the idea of creepy, crawly, biting bugs living in their hair so they tended to take much better care of theirs. It was the boys who really didn't like washing their hair. They still don't, lol! This is why school boards targeted the boys and not the girls. Of course what didn't help is long hair on women has always been acceptable in polite society, whereas with men, it changes with the era. So when you combined the fact that "polite society" at the time meant a nice haircut for men, the whole long hair on boys was a combined FU and a health concern, well what more provocation did the Establishment need to ban it on boys!

Sometimes, it pays to be this old. It helps when you can actually remember the reasons for these policies when you lived through their implementation and the controversies they caused at the time.

Which is why I laughed at the whole "It's Racist" notion!

 
 
 
Kathleen
1.1.1  Kathleen  replied to  Citizen Kane-473667 @1.1    one month ago

I have to agree with you on the cleanliness of keeping long hair. As I mentioned in the other article, my husband had long hair but kept it clean. Shorter hair is easier to take care of and in my opinion it looks neater. As with older women, they like to keep their hair shorter. Age plays a big factor with hair length, with race it really shouldn’t  as long as all races keep their hair clean.

 
 
 
lib50
1.1.2  lib50  replied to  Citizen Kane-473667 @1.1    one month ago
Now to the sexist part of the policies; it is, but for a good reason. Girls tend to wash their hair, even when the counter-culture movement was in full swing. They tend to bathe more in general for that matter.

Wow, I find that sexist.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.3  XDm9mm  replied to  lib50 @1.1.2    one month ago
Wow, I find that sexist.

While you find it sexist, it's simply the truth.

Or are you going to say that girls don't care about their appearance?  If so, why the makeup and everything else to LOOK GOOD.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
1.1.4  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.3    one month ago

I'm sorry, but I don't remember any boys with long hair being dirty in the '70s. (yes I am giving my age away, LOL).

 
 
 
Citizen Kane-473667
1.1.5  Citizen Kane-473667  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1.4    one month ago
I'm sorry, but I don't remember any boys with long hair being dirty in the '70s.

The one's in your schools?  Maybe that has to do with the peer pressure to bathe, lol! One thing about kids, we could be pretty mean to people who stunk!

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.6  XDm9mm  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1.4    one month ago
I'm sorry, but I don't remember any boys with long hair being dirty in the '70s.

Poor memory possibly?   I remember quite a few that to be honest, I hated being in the same classroom with due to the stench coming from them.  Of course, I'm a bit older than you, and out of school by the 70's, closing in on 70 next month, and some cleaned up.  They discovered that being a "hippie" and 'natural' was not overly endearing to the girls even drenching themselves in English Leather or AquaVelva. 

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
1.1.7  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.6    one month ago
Poor memory possibly? 

Hey, no age jokes. My memory is just fine.

And I am sorry, but I graduated in 1978 and I don't remember anyone who smelled, ever. 

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.8  XDm9mm  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1.7    one month ago
Hey, no age jokes. My memory is just fine.

So says you!!  jrSmiley_82_smiley_image.gifjrSmiley_82_smiley_image.gif

And I am sorry, but I graduated in 1978 and I don't remember anyone who smelled, ever. 

Youngster.   And you're lucky.  The hippie phase had pretty much run it's course by then.   

However, the era DID have it's perks!!   Oh so much "free love" running all over the place, it kept people in shape!

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.9  JohnRussell  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1.7    one month ago

They associate hippies with dirty Perrie, just like some people associate blacks with lazy and latinos with greasy. 

Archie Bunker lives. 

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
1.1.10  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.8    one month ago
However, the era DID have it's perks!!   Oh so much "free love" running all over the place, it kept people in shape!

LMAO!

I wouldn't have known. I was a "good girl", LOL!

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.11  JohnRussell  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1.7    one month ago

I was never a hippie but I did occasionally go into the hippie part of town , for fun. 

Mostly they were high. 

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
1.1.12  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.9    one month ago
They associate hippies with dirty Perrie, just like some people associate blacks with lazy and latinos with greasy. 

John, I am not getting that from this discussion. The question about the length of the hair could be racist, maybe, but no one is talking about it being dirty. 

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.13  XDm9mm  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.9    one month ago
They associate hippies with dirty Perrie, just like some people associate blacks with lazy and latinos with greasy.  Archie Bunker lives. 

Only in your mind JR, only your mind.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.14  JohnRussell  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1.12    one month ago

John, I am not getting that from this discussion. 

I remember quite a few that to be honest, I hated being in the same classroom with due to the stench coming from them.  Of course, I'm a bit older than you, and out of school by the 70's, closing in on 70 next month, and some cleaned up.  They discovered that being a "hippie" and 'natural' was not overly endearing to the girls even drenching themselves in English Leather or AquaVelva. 

Didnt someone here say that?

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.15  XDm9mm  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.14    one month ago
I remember quite a few that to be honest

Read the ENTIRE post, not what you THINK it said.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.16  JohnRussell  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.15    one month ago

[Deleted]

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.17  JohnRussell  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.15    one month ago
The reasons schools started these policies was ostensibly for Health Concerns because the hippies were notorious for being shall we say, a little lax in their bathing standards by American ideals.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.18  XDm9mm  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.17    one month ago
hippies were notorious for being shall we say, a little lax in their bathing standards by American ideals.

Facts are facts JR.  Whether you like them or not does not change the FACT.

 
 
 
lib50
1.1.19  lib50  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.3    one month ago

It is not the truth, plenty of women have bad hygiene and plenty of men are OCD about their personal habits.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.20  XDm9mm  replied to  lib50 @1.1.19    one month ago
It is not the truth, plenty of women have bad hygiene and plenty of men are OCD about their personal habits.

Can you explicitly indicate where I said otherwise?   Here's a clue.  NOWHERE.

 
 
 
lib50
1.1.21  lib50  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.3    one month ago
Or are you going to say that girls don't care about their appearance?  If so, why the makeup and everything else to LOOK GOOD.

Societal pressure.  My whole point is that one can't just make sweeping generalizations like 'girls have cleaner hair than boys'.  We aren't in the 60's anymore.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
2  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.    one month ago

You know, I thought this was settled in the '70s when it was found that public schools could NOT dictate dress policy. And I am very sure about this, since the public school that I taught at, decided to become a uniform school, but we could NOT force the kids to wear uniforms. It was voluntary since it was part of federal law. Most of our students did wear uniforms but some didn't and there wasn't a thing we could do about it. 

As for this being racist, we would have to know if there are white boys with long hair. I know a lot of boys who are into heavy metal that wear their hair long. So we don't have enough information about this. 

 
 
 
Citizen Kane-473667
2.1  Citizen Kane-473667  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @2    one month ago
As for this being racist, we would have to know if there are white boys with long hair.

Videos linked to the two stories shows white boys who were also forced to get haircuts. One got a haircut that didn't quite meet the standards and was forced to get another one.

The only time I know of where a boy cannot be forced to cut their hair is when it conflicts with their religious beliefs.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
2.1.1  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Citizen Kane-473667 @2.1    one month ago

But that still doesn't address if other boys have long hair. 

 
 
 
Citizen Kane-473667
2.1.2  Citizen Kane-473667  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @2.1.1    one month ago
But that still doesn't address if other boys have long hair.

Not sure what you mean because if white boys are also being forced to get their hair cut, then it shows that both Black and White do have the same standards being applied. What is important that these videos have been skipping over is that the students can accept In School Suspension and continue to attend while they appeal to the court.

They chose not to.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
2.1.3  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Citizen Kane-473667 @2.1.2    one month ago
Not sure what you mean because if white boys are also being forced to get their hair cut, then it shows that both Black and White do have the same standards being applied. 

That is the issue at hand. We don't know if they are or not. If they are than what is good for the goose is good for the gander. If not, then this is targeted. 

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
2.2.1  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2    one month ago

Neither link works.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
2.2.2  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @2.2.1    one month ago

Here are a few of the basics on what public schools can and can’t do when it comes to dress codes.

  • Dress codes can’t be explicitly discriminatory.   That means that while dress codes may specify   types   of attire that are acceptable, these requirements should not differ based on students’ sex or their race, for that matter — though race distinctions in dress codes tend not to be overt. This is because, under federal laws protecting against discrimination in education, Title IX and the Constitution’s equal protection guarantee, schools can’t base either a dress code or its enforcement on sex stereotypes — generalizations about what types of clothing or appearance are appropriate for a boy or a girl. For example, a dress code can’t require girls, and only girls, to   only wear skirts or dresses   and boys, and only boys, to wear pants or a jacket and tie. The same goes for ceremonial events and special occasions, like   prom ,   yearbook photographs , or graduation. A school can specify “formal attire,” or even “gowns or tuxedoes,” but it can’t require that girls, and only girls, wear gowns or that boys, and only boys, wear a tux.
     
  • All students, whether transgender or cisgender, must be allowed to wear clothing consistent with their gender identity and expression . Again, this is because the clothing we wear is part of the way we express our identity and because schools can’t stereotype students’ appearance or behavior based on their gender or sex assigned at birth.
     
  • Dress codes that are targeted at or unevenly enforced against particular groups of students may violate laws prohibiting race and sex discrimination . Dress codes are   frequently unevenly enforced   against girls for wearing clothing that is considered a “distraction” to boys in the classroom — reinforcing stereotypes about how “good girls” dress and privileging boys’ ability to concentrate over girls’ comfort and ability to learn.

    Though today’s dress codes are unlikely to be explicitly race-based, there can also be stark racial overtones. The Malden policy — in addition to prohibiting hair extensions, a style predominantly worn by Black girls — also prohibits “hair more than 2 inch ( sic .) in thickness or height.” The policy thus   effectively prohibits   many Black students of either sex from wearing their hair “naturally” without cutting it extremely short — making it abundantly clear   which   students the school is concerned about distracting versus being distractions. This type of intersecting race and sex discrimination is illegal.
     
  • Schools can’t discriminate based on the viewpoint expressed by your clothing.   The Supreme Court   has recognized   that public school students do not “shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate.” The First Amendment prohibits schools from picking and choosing which views students are allowed to express. All views have to be treated equally, so long as they are not obscene or disruptive. This means that if a school permits items like t-shirts with slogans, buttons, or   wristbands , it has to permit them   no matter what message they express .
     
  • Grooming codes regulating hair length, jewelry, or ear piercing   can raise many of the same issues , though the courts have been less consistent about applying antidiscrimination laws in those contexts. For this reason, protections may vary greatly based on where you live. Note also that school dress or grooming codes may have to be adapted when they conflict with students’ religious freedom, such as   prohibiting headscarves .

What this boils down to is that schools’ authority to impose dress codes is not unlimited. Students should be   informed of their rights   so they can speak out if there are violations. And school administrators would do well to reexamine their dress codes to guard against being the next target for protest, whether in the classroom, on the internet, or in court.

https://www.aclu.org/blog/womens-rights/womens-rights-education/5-things-public-schools-can-and-cant-do-when-it-comes

 
 
 
Texan1211
2.2.3  Texan1211  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @2.2.2    one month ago

So, schools may enforce dress codes if enforced fairly and properly.

Which was my point.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
2.2.4  XDm9mm  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @2.2.1    one month ago
Neither link works.

Actually, the links work, but apparently, the ACLU moved or deleted the applicable pages.   

However, even searching the ACLU site, I couldn't find them so I'll assume they're deleted.

 
 
 
Texan1211
2.2.5  Texan1211  replied to  XDm9mm @2.2.4    one month ago

From the links that didn't work for some reason:

https://www.aclunc.org/our-work/know-your-rights/know-your-rights-school-dress-codes...

Can my school make a dress code policy?
YES.i But your school does not have the right to use the policy to disfavor a specific message or single out one particular group of students

Can my school enforce its dress code policy against only some students?
USUALLY NOT. For example, a dress code that prohibits “gang-related” apparel but is only enforced against Black students would be race discrimination and against the law.

Can my school have different dress code policies for boys and girls?
YES. Many schools do have different dress code policies for boys and girls. But some differences in dress codes may not be okay. Such policies could include ones that prohibit girls from wearing yoga pants and leg warmers or boys from having long hair. If you can’t be yourself at school because of a gendered school dress code policy—for example, if you are a boy and you need to have long hair for religious reasons—please contact us.

And:

https://www.aclu.org/.../5-things-public-schools-can-and-cant-do-when-it-comes

Dress codes can’t be explicitly discriminatory. That means that while dress codes may …
All students, whether transgender or cisgender, must be allowed to wear clothing consistent …
Dress codes that are targeted at or unevenly enforced against particular groups of students …
Schools can’t discriminate based on the viewpoint expressed by your clothing. 
 
 
 
XDm9mm
2.2.6  XDm9mm  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.5    one month ago
From the links that didn't work for some reason:

All I got was the ubiquitous "404 Error" when I used the links.

I actually went to the first link you provided above, and was returned this:

PAGE NOT FOUND - 404 ERROR

 Don't ask me.....  I'm too old to worry about things like this anymore.  One day something works, the next day it doesn't.

 
 
 
Texan1211
2.2.7  Texan1211  replied to  XDm9mm @2.2.6    one month ago

I know, it is frustrating.

I typed "Can public schools enforce dress codes?" and those (and other) links popped up. That is how I was able to go back and copy what was in them.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
2.2.8  XDm9mm  replied to  Texan1211 @2.2.7    one month ago
I know, it is frustrating

Hell, I've tried to go back to sites I viewed and closed to review something and not using the specific verbiage, I couldn't find it again.   

 
 
 
devangelical
3  devangelical    one month ago

1st amendment slam dunk. the ACLU is already involved. ironic that the same people supporting this ridiculous policy (settled about 50 years ago) are those that would probably welcome religious activities back in public schools.

hopefully the ISD sees the light before they're sued into bankruptcy and possibly forced into eliminating their athletic programs to regain financial solvency. local parents may become discontent with local school officials if that happens.

 
 
 
Citizen Kane-473667
3.1  Citizen Kane-473667  replied to  devangelical @3    one month ago
(settled about 50 years ago)

Link?

 
 
 
Texan1211
3.1.1  Texan1211  replied to  Citizen Kane-473667 @3.1    one month ago

Some seem to have fevered imaginations, especially when it comes to religion and/or rules and laws.

If the dress codes are enforced properly and fairly, the school may have them.

Nothing wrong with that, either.

 
 
 
Texan1211
3.1.3  Texan1211  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1.2    one month ago

No, exactly that.

Dress codes may be enforced if done fairly and properly.

Even the ACLU says so!

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
3.1.4  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Texan1211 @3.1.3    one month ago

Here is another version: 

Clothing as a primary means for expressing ideas for students is as primitive as clothing itself, yet schools across the country often grapple with whether to enforce strict dress code policies that may interfere with a students’ right to self-expression.

While school boards are generally allowed to create and enforce dress code programs within their districts, they must do so without violating the constitutional rights of students.

School Dress Code Laws

The first school dress code law was established in 1969 by the U.S. Supreme Court. The case, known as   Tinker vs. Des Moines Independent School District , involved several high school students who wore black armbands to school in a planned protest against the Vietnam War. In a far-reaching decision, the Court essentially decided that schools may limit student expression (such as enforcing dress codes) if there is a legitimate concern that such expression will be disruptive to the learning environment or violate the rights of others.

Today, most states have laws that allow school boards to make dress code rules for students within their district to promote a safe, disciplined school environment, prevent interference with schoolwork and discipline, and to encourage uniformity of student dress. For instance, dress codes that prohibit clothing that is vulgar, obscene or worn in a manner that disrupts school activity are generally permitted – whereas dress codes that censor student expression because educators do not like the message are generally not permitted.

Dress Code Policies vs. Freedom of Speech

Not all speech is protected in a school setting. For example, students who wear clothing that follows the latest fashion trend – such as oversized shirts and slouchy jeans for boys, or short skirts and mid-drift cut-out shirts on girls – or clothing that supports a particular sports team, religion, or political point of view, may be prohibited in dress code policies if the student’s choice in clothing draws attention away from the school’s learning environment.

Therefore, limits on dress codes have including the following:

  • Limits on ‘gang-related’ clothing, sometimes described as over-sized clothing and other clothing meant to show affiliation with a certain gang or group, such as certain colors, logos, brand names, or arrangement
  • Ban on suggestively-themed T-shirts, such as Marilyn Manson t-shirts
  • Requirement to wear school colors only
  • Limits on skirt, shirt, and pant length
  • Ban on clothing that depicts lewd, sexually explicit, or idecent drug use
  • Seasonal closthing restriction, such as limits on midriffs and lower backs not being exposed in hot weather
  • "Baggy pants" restriction prohibiting students from wearing clothin that exposes underwear or body parts in a way that is indecent or vulgar

Freedom of Religion Issues

In contrast to limits on dress as a means to providing a safe learning environment, school dress codes, in most cases, cannot be used to prevent students from expressing their religion beliefs. Both the Constitution and most state laws protect students’ rights to wear religious attire inool school, such as the wearing of a turban, yarmulke, or head scarf.

Below are situations where dress codes have been challenged on religious freedom grounds:

  • Muslim Girl suspended for wearing a head scarf
  • Ban on cross necklaces
  • Bans on wearing traditional dress (such as feather or tribal cloth) to graduation
  • Ban on the wearing of non-US flag necklaces
  • Ban on rosaries
  • Requirement that boys cut their hair to comply with a campus dress code

https://education.findlaw.com/student-rights/school-dress-codes.html

Please notice that hair length is not part of these limitations. 

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
3.1.5  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Texan1211 @3.1.1    one month ago
If the dress codes are enforced properly and fairly, the school may have them.

Neither do I. Hence why I brought this article into discussion. I went through all the trouble of telling you that I taught at a uniform public school, but I know the one thing we couldn't do was MAKE the students wear the uniform. Peer pressure often did the work for us.

 
 
 
Kathleen
4  Kathleen    one month ago

Here is to all students of all races... pull up your damn pants. For the guys.

Girls, don’t let anything hang out, that goes for the boobs and the cheeks. 

 
 
 
Enoch
6  Enoch    one month ago

If anyone wants to discriminate against me for long hair, they are decades too late.

Enoch, Slicking Over My Chrome Dome.

 
 
 
Split Personality
7  Split Personality    one month ago

Ok, I will go out on a limb and say that

no dress code that allows girls to have hair as long as possible

or short as possible , as in Marine Corps high & tight,

 is fair when it limits the boys/men's style of haircut favored by Hercules & Samson.

 
 
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