Two of the last white giraffes on Earth were slaughtered by poachers

  
Via:  perrie-halpern  •  3 months ago  •  20 comments

By:   Brandon Specktor, Live Science

Two of the last white giraffes on Earth were slaughtered by poachers
There may be just one white giraffe left now, conservationists said.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



Rangers at a nature conservancy in Garissa County, Kenya, have discovered the skeletal remains of two rare white giraffes that went missing several months ago.

According to a   statement issued on Twitter , the carcasses belong to a mother and her 7-month-old calf — two of only three white giraffes living in Ishaqbini Hirola Community Conservancy — and appear to have been there for four months. All signs indicate that the animals were killed and butchered by armed poachers.

"This is a very sad day for the community… and Kenya as a whole. We are the only community in the world who are custodians of the white giraffe," Mohammed Ahmednoor, manager of the conservancy, said in the statement.

The poachers have not been identified, and their motive remains unclear. The Kenya Wildlife Service, the main conservation body in Kenya, is currently investigating the killings.

200312-white-giraffe-ew-312p_a80b0377881 The rare white giraffe taken on May 31, 2017, in Garissa County, Kenya. Ishaqbini Hirola Community Conservancy / via AFP - Getty Images

One white giraffe remains in the park — an adult male — and it may be the last white giraffe in the world, the conservancy said.

The white giraffes are not albino, the conservancy noted, but they have a condition called leucism, which causes a partial loss of skin pigmentation. Unlike animals with albinism, animals with leucism still produce dark pigment in their soft tissue cells, which is why the giraffes in this family have dark eyes and dark tail hair.

Leucism affects many mammals, but it is extremely rare in giraffes. Outside of this Kenyan giraffe family, only one other white giraffe has been spotted in Africa; it was last seen in Tanzania's Tarangire National Park in January 2016, according to Kenya's   Northern Rangelands Trust .

White or otherwise, all reticulated giraffes ( Giraffa reticulata,   the species found in the conservancy and throughout northern Kenya) are considered endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. About 15,780 individuals remain in the wild, according to an estimate from the   Giraffe Conservation Foundation   (GCF). That represents a decline of about 56% from the roughly 36,000 estimated to remain in the wild 30 years ago. The main threats to their survival are loss of habitat (due to human activities) and poaching.


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Perrie Halpern R.A.
1  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.    3 months ago

It's moments like this, that I think we deserve the coronavirus. 

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1    3 months ago

Not us,Perrie,but the poachers deserve worse than that.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
1.1.1  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1.1    3 months ago

Buzz,

While I agree that the poachers deserve worse, humans have been hunting loads of animals to near extinction for hundreds of years. We have no respect for our fellow animals that we share this earth with.

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.1.2  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1.1    3 months ago

Personally, I think the poachers should be stripped buck naked,  hands tied behind their backs, and a necklace of steaks around their necks.Tell em if they make it through the park in one in one piece they are off the hook! I hate poachers!

 
 
 
devangelical
1.1.3  devangelical  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @1.1.2    3 months ago

too expensive. a 2.5 inch sheet metal screw thru their spinal cords at the base of the neck, over-torqued with a cordless, and deposit them alive next to a pride of lions after a game camera has been set up to film the buffet. then post it on the local internet.

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.1.4  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  devangelical @1.1.3    3 months ago

I like it!

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.5  XDm9mm  replied to  devangelical @1.1.3    3 months ago
too expensive. a 2.5 inch sheet metal screw thru their spinal cords at the base of the neck, over-torqued with a cordless, and deposit them alive next to a pride of lions after a game camera has been set up to film the buffet. then post it on the local internet.

First, a 2.5 inch screw through their spinal cord would very likely kill them instantly as it would stop bodily functions below that point....  you know those minor things like the heart pumping and breathing ability.   Minor considerations I know, but that eliminates the "alive" part.

A possible solution would be to stake them down over one of the very large and active ant hills and just sprinkle them lightly with either sugar or honey to get the ants going.  The sugar or honey are actually unnecessary expenses and could be eliminated simply by making a couple of very small cuts permitting a constant flow of blood which would also be beneficial as it would possibly entice that pride of lions to make a visit and quite possibly some of the local hyenas would join the dinner party.  

However, the ants would extend the pain appreciably as opposed to the lions and hyenas.

Then you could set up a video feed of the ants at work for a few days until there were only bones left and have it posted on pay-per-view, using the proceeds to hire additional game wardens to protect other animals (the four legged variety).

 
 
 
Kathleen
1.1.6  Kathleen  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.5    3 months ago

Damn.... I sure wouldn’t want to make you guys mad... lol

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.7  XDm9mm  replied to  Kathleen @1.1.6    3 months ago
Damn.... I sure wouldn’t want to make you guys mad... lol

Hell, I was being nice.   You should see me when I'm annoyed, and really pissed off even scares me!!jrSmiley_51_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.1.8  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Kathleen @1.1.6    3 months ago

Actually, I purposely left out smearing their whole body with fresh antelope blood as well.

 
 
 
bbl-1
2  bbl-1    3 months ago

Our planet is becoming harder.  The exploitation from the human race onto all others, including itself is rising. 

I wonder if these 'particular animals' were taken for a fraudulent medicinal or religious reason.

Sad story, but not surprising.

 
 
 
Krishna
3  Krishna    3 months ago

In parts of Asia Rhinoceros horns are used for their alledged medicinal value.

 
 
 
Kavika
4  Kavika     3 months ago

Shoot the poachers.

 
 
 
Kathleen
7  Kathleen    3 months ago

Makes me so angry...

Time to hunt down the poachers.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
7.1  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Kathleen @7    3 months ago

I have to agree with you Kathleen.

 
 
 
Kavika
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
9.1  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Kavika @9    3 months ago

Good!

 
 
 
It Is ME
10  It Is ME    3 months ago

"We are the only community in the world who are custodians of the white giraffe," Mohammed Ahmednoor, manager of the conservancy"

uuuuummmmm …… maybe do a "Better" job ? jrSmiley_97_smiley_image.gif

How many "White Giraffes do they have to "Watch Over" anyway ?

 
 
 
The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen"
11  The People's Fish, Still "Hand Of The Queen"    3 months ago

How long will one of those things feed a family of four?

 
 
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