Violence by far-right is among US’s most dangerous terrorist threats, study finds

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  tessylo  •  one week ago  •  52 comments

By:   Jason Wilson, The Guardian

Violence by far-right is among US’s most dangerous terrorist threats, study finds

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



World

Violence by far-right is among US’s most dangerous terrorist threats, study finds





Jason Wilson


the_guardian_Light.png June 27, 2020, 5:00 AM EDT








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Photograph: Logan Cyrus/AFP/Getty Images

Violence by far-right groups and individuals has emerged as one of the most dangerous terrorist threats faced by US law enforcement and triggered a wave of warnings and arrests of people associated with those extremist movements.

The most recent in-depth analysis of far-right terrorism comes from the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS).

Related:  How the US military has failed to address white supremacy in its ranks

In a   report   released last week, the Escalating Terrorism Problem in the United States, CSIS analyzes 25 years of domestic terrorism incidents and finds that the majority of attacks and plots have come from the far right.




The report says “the majority of all terrorist incidents in the United States since 1994, and the total number of rightwing attacks and plots has grown significantly during the past six years”, with the far right launching two-thirds of attacks and plots in 2019, and 90% of those in 2020.

The report adds: “Far-right terrorism has significantly outpaced terrorism from other types of perpetrators.” The second most significant source of attacks and plots in the US has been “religious extremists”, almost all “Salafi jihadists inspired by the Islamic State and al-Qaida”.

The report shows the far left has been an increasingly negligible source of attacks since the mid 2000s. At that time the FBI   defined   arsons and other forms of property damage as domestic terrorism during a period some have called the “ Green Scare ”.

The CSIS study came during a new wave of terror attacks and plots from white supremacist and anti-government extremists.

Last Monday, the Department of Justice announced that it had brought an   array of charges , including terrorism related offenses, against a US army soldier who subscribed to a mix of white supremacist and satanist beliefs which are characteristic of so-called “accelerationist” neo-nazis like Atomwaffen Division.

Last week,   federal charges   were brought on Steven Carillo for the murder of a federal security officer and a sheriff’s deputy. Like the   three men arrested   for an alleged terror plot in Nevada earlier this month, the FBI says Carillo identified with the extreme anti-government “boogaloo” movement, which is principally concerned with removing government regulation of firearms.

But critics question the timing and motivations of the intelligence community’s pivot to combatting rightwing extremism as it comes at a time when some are arguing the legal and institutional counterterrorism apparatus developed to combat overseas terror groups should now be adapted to domestic extremists.

For some that has deep implications for civil liberties and constitutional rights, especially when it comes to suggestions that new laws should be drafted to certify such groups as domestic terrorist organizations.

Eric Ward, executive director of the civil rights nonprofit the   Western States Center , said: “We are deeply concerned by the idea of any type of law that creates a legal definition around domestic terrorism. There are significant laws already on the books that meet the challenges of this moment.”

Ward said that rather than new laws, “we need a responsible leadership that is actually willing to use the tools that are already on hand”.

Ward added: “Too often we have to respond to political crisis with criminalization. And I think that is a mistake”.

But the push for new laws is an ongoing one.

In April, a joint report from George Washington University’s Program on extremism (GWU PoE) and the Anti-Defamation League (ADL)   included a proposal for   a “rights protecting domestic terrorism statute”. They said the law could provide “more tools for the investigation and prosecution of groups and individuals” associated with rightwing extremism.

The report did acknowledge “significant constitutional questions” would be raised by such a statute, and the possibility of “unintended consequences, particularly for members of minorities”.

There are also concerns around the creation of a surveillance state.

The GWU/ADL proposal called for increased information sharing between law enforcement agencies, increased data collection and increased resourcing.

Similar arguments have been made by   influential legal and national security academics ,   national security nonprofits   and   policy shops .

Congressman Max Rose, a New York Democrat, has   gone further   in calling for the formal designation of US-based groups with international connections as Foreign Terror Organizations.

The FBI, meanwhile, is   increasingly prepared   to make comparisons between right wing extremists and Islamist terror groups.

Seth Jones, the lead author of the CSIS report, offered qualified support for the formal designation of terror groups, saying: “I still think it’s important to think through the first amendment implications and other pros and cons. But I do support taking a serious look at designation.”

Designation could open the way, he said, to also investigating people who support such groups without having formal membership in any.

But critics are alarmed by what they see as the application of ideas derived from the “war on terror” to domestic extremists.

Mike German , Brennan Center fellow, is a former FBI agent who investigated rightwing extremists but is now focused on law enforcement and intelligence oversight and reform. He sees arguments for domestic terror statutes as part of a broader reorientation of the “national security establishment” away from conflicts in the Middle East.

German attributes this move to a realization “that Isis and al-Qaida were were not as threatening to Americans as they had been, and that foreign counter-terrorism in general was sort of running out of steam”.

German said: “It’s a way of expanding the target realm that gives the counterterrorism enterprise targets that they can use to to get statistical accomplishments, rather than looking at whether or not the violence itself is reduced.”

German has   argued   federal authorities should prioritize the investigation of the violent crimes of far right extremists, and call them terrorist acts where appropriate, but that they should be prosecuted using existing laws, with a consideration of alternative responses like restorative justice.

He added: “When I worked these cases in the 1990s, no one suggested that we didn’t have sufficient legal authority.”





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Tessylo
1  seeder  Tessylo    one week ago

The report says “the majority of all terrorist incidents in the United States since 1994, and the total number of rightwing attacks and plots has grown significantly during the past six years”, with the far right launching two-thirds of attacks and plots in 2019, and 90% of those in 2020.

The report adds: “Far-right terrorism has significantly outpaced terrorism from other types of perpetrators.” The second most significant source of attacks and plots in the US has been “religious extremists”, almost all “Salafi jihadists inspired by the Islamic State and al-Qaida”.

The report shows the far left has been an increasingly negligible source of attacks since the mid 2000s. At that time the FBI    defined    arsons and other forms of property damage as domestic terrorism during a period some have called the “  Green Scare  ”.

 
 
 
MUVA
2  MUVA    one week ago

No

 
 
 
Tessylo
2.1  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  MUVA @2    one week ago

No what?

 
 
 
MUVA
2.1.1  MUVA  replied to  Tessylo @2.1    one week ago

Just No.

 
 
 
Tessylo
2.1.2  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  MUVA @2.1.1    one week ago

Well that clears things up quite nicely.

 
 
 
MUVA
2.1.4  MUVA  replied to  JBB @2.1.3    one week ago

I wouldn't wipe my ass with that article center for american progress is where they breed hacks.

 
 
 
MUVA
2.1.5  MUVA  replied to  Tessylo @2.1.2    one week ago

I always want to please you I'm glad I could help.

 
 
 
JBB
2.1.6  JBB  replied to  MUVA @2.1.4    one week ago
 
 
 
MUVA
2.1.7  MUVA  replied to  JBB @2.1.6    one week ago

Nobody told me anything of the sort try again.

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
2.1.8  FLYNAVY1  replied to  MUVA @2.1.7    one week ago

Nobody told me anything of the sort try again.

You might try listening.

Have you heard the one about Trump being informed of Russia paying bounties on our soldiers in Afghanistan and doing nothing about it except asking that Russia be readmitted to the G7?

 
 
 
MUVA
2.1.9  MUVA  replied to  FLYNAVY1 @2.1.8    one week ago

I can't listen to printed words.

 
 
 
Krishna
2.1.10  Krishna  replied to  MUVA @2.1.1    one week ago

Well MUVA. you've inspired me to reply to your most excellent comment. So I say (in all caps yet!!!):

PERHAPS!!!

And to quote the irrepressible Peter Lorre in The Maltese Falcon:

Maybe yes, maybe no . . .

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3  XDm9mm    one week ago

And the Center for Strategic and International Studies has such a stellar reputation.

Some of Georgetown University's professors criticized CSIS staff members for giving academically unsupported assessments of foreign policy issues during public interviews. [25] Donations to Georgetown University decreased because of its association with CSIS. [ citation needed ] A special committee studied the friction, and its report stated that CSIS was more focused on the media than to scholarly research and recommended that CSIS be formally separated from Georgetown University. [25] On 17 October 1986, Georgetown University's board of directors voted to sever all ties with CSIS. [25]

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Center_for_Strategic_and_International_Studies

 
 
 
Tessylo
3.1  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  XDm9mm @3    one week ago

I'll take their word over yours.

And your wikipedia reference.

LOL

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.1.1  XDm9mm  replied to  Tessylo @3.1    one week ago
I'll take their word over yours.

And your wikipedia reference.

LOL

Glad to know you don't like historical facts!!

So, to quote you:   LOL

 
 
 
Tessylo
3.1.2  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  XDm9mm @3.1.1    one week ago

I never take you seriously.  

Move along there dude, move along . . . . 

 
 
 
Tessylo
3.1.3  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  XDm9mm @3.1.1    one week ago

Do you know someone named Reggin?

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.1.4  XDm9mm  replied to  Tessylo @3.1.2    one week ago
I never take you seriously.  

That's your personal loss.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.1.5  XDm9mm  replied to  Tessylo @3.1.3    one week ago
Do you know someone named Reggin?

Who??

 
 
 
Tessylo
3.1.6  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  XDm9mm @3.1.4    one week ago

NO LOSS WHATSOEVER.

 
 
 
Tessylo
3.1.7  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  XDm9mm @3.1.5    one week ago

That's what I thought. . . 

 
 
 
Krishna
3.1.8  Krishna  replied to  Tessylo @3.1    one week ago
And your wikipedia reference.

And as I'm sure most of us would agree:

Wikipedia never lies!

320

 
 
 
devangelical
3.1.9  devangelical  replied to  Tessylo @3.1.7    one week ago

...they all know rereggin.

 
 
 
JBB
3.2  JBB  replied to  XDm9mm @3    one week ago

Recruiting rightwingers is a proven threat to American soldiers now.

https://www.foxnews.com/us/us-solider-accused-plot-kill-unit-giving-classified-violent-neo-nazi-group

 
 
 
XDm9mm
3.2.1  XDm9mm  replied to  JBB @3.2    one week ago
Recruiting rightwingers is a proven threat to American soldiers now

You use one asswipe terrorist among the millions of American service members is truly amazing as your basis for proof.  But not unusual.

 
 
 
MUVA
3.2.2  MUVA  replied to  XDm9mm @3.2.1    one week ago

If they only knew the amount of conservative leaning people not right wingers which is a made up term anyway  in the military it would make some leftist cringe probably 80 percent of the special forces guys I know.

 
 
 
Tessylo
3.2.3  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  MUVA @3.2.2    one week ago

This is from the movie Jack Reacher, but I believe it's true:

"There are four types of people who join the military.

For some, it's family trade.

Others are patriots, eager to serve.

Next you have those who just need a job.

Than there's the kind who want the legal means of killing other people."

I think #4 describes a percentage of the police and the military, a small percentage . . . 

 
 
 
Krishna
3.2.4  Krishna  replied to  XDm9mm @3.2.1    one week ago

No.

 
 
 
Tessylo
3.2.5  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  Krishna @3.2.4    one week ago

LOL!

I like you.

 
 
 
Krishna
3.2.7  Krishna  replied to  Tessylo @3.2.5    one week ago

jrSmiley_4_smiley_image.png

 
 
 
Sparty On
4  Sparty On    one week ago

[deleted]

[tessylo is not the topic.]

 
 
 
Tessylo
4.1  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  Sparty On @4    one week ago

removed for context

 
 
 
Krishna
4.2  Krishna  replied to  Sparty On @4    one week ago
And you’re concerned about right wing terrorism?

Well, in answer to your question, this quote from David Duke may help answer that question:

A former Ku Klux Klan leader – or 'grand wizard' – has suggested fascists had helped Donald Trump win the US presidential election.

David Duke, who once led the neo-Nazi, white-supermacist organisation, tweeted the claim on election night. “This is one of the most exciting nights of my life,” Mr Duke wrote.

“Make no mistake about it, our people have played a huge role in electing Trump!”

 
 
 
Tessylo
4.4  seeder  Tessylo  replied to  Sparty On @4    one week ago

https://www.newsweek.com/chicago-dangerous-trevor-noah-us-murder-capital-686570

Is Chicago Dangerous? Trevor Noah Examines Windy City's Reputation as U.S. Murder Capital and How Obama Is Linked

BY   TUFAYEL AHMED   ON 10/17/17 AT 8:13 AM EDT
daily-show-trevor-noah.jpg
Trevor Noah on "The Daily Show Undesked" in Chicago on October 16. JEFF SCHEAR/GETTY

The Daily Show   is on the move for one week only, as Trevor Noah swaps his New York soundstage for the Athenaeum Theatre in Chicago.

Noah's first night in the Windy City featured the South African comedian's take on Chicago's reputation as the murder capital of the United States. And, well, the results were pretty interesting.

"When I said we were coming here, [people] said, 'It's a good thing you're wearing a suit, Trevor. You'll save the undertaker some time,'" Noah explained on Monday's installment of the   Comedy Central program.

Noah said that as a South African, he can relate to being stereotyped "through crime," but he admitted, "Chicago is famous for its violence." That dovetailed into a video package of President Donald Trump's various remarks about Chicago being "terrible" and "worse than some of the countries you read about in the Middle East." As Noah put it: "According to the president, Chicago is basically Syria, but with different pizza."
So just how dangerous is Chicago actually?  Looking beyond the dramatic hyperbole, Noah decided to find out what Chicago is like for himself. "If I just believed what I saw on TV, I would never want to come to Chicago," he said.

The comedian pointed out that while Chicago has the most murders of any city in the U.S., it is the third biggest city in the U.S. too.

Noah said: "If you want to talk about cities that are most dangerous, you have to look at murders per capita—the amount of violent crime relative to the size of the city."

To illustrate his point, the comedian said, "Would you rather be in a big city with five Pennywise the clowns?  Or in an Uber Pool with just one? That's per capita."

Based on murders per capita, the Illinois city   was well below   the murder rates in St. Louis, Missouri and Baltimore, Maryland, said Noah.

But, the host said, politicians, especially those from "the right," are "obsessed" with Chicago's murder rates. And Noah has a theory as to why. Cut to footage of right-wing politicians blasting Chicago native and Democrat President Barack Obama over the city's crime rates.

"Oh, now I get it. When there's shootings, Obama's from Chicago. All the other times, he's from Kenya," Noah quipped, referring to the   ludicrous birther conspiracies   about the former president.

 
 
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