How To Identify Critical Race Theory In The Classroom

  

Category:  News & Politics

By:  john-russell  •  3 months ago  •  26 comments

How To Identify Critical Race Theory In The Classroom









Charlie Sykes

@SykesCharlie












Don't think this makes the point they think it makes.

















Quote Tweet
















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Texas Public Policy Foundation




@TPPF







· 20h




Are you wondering if Critical Race Theory is being taught in your child's school? Stay on the lookout for some of CRT's less "buzzworthy" names and language 














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JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1  author  JohnRussell    3 months ago

Anti-critical race theory activists want to ban classroom discussions of

Diversity

Inclusion

Multi-culturalism

Social Justice

Institutional racism

Anti-racism

White supremacy

Colonialism and colonizers

Disparate outcomes

Eurocentric concepts

Black Lives Matter

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  JohnRussell @1    3 months ago

800

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
Professor Expert
1.2  Bob Nelson  replied to  JohnRussell @1    3 months ago

Well.... the kids can talk about football... 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.2.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Bob Nelson @1.2    3 months ago
Well.... the kids can talk about football... 

They probably do that already. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2  author  JohnRussell    3 months ago

The Ghost of Anne Hathaways Husband
@PrufrokAlfredJ
·
14m
Replying to
@SykesCharlie

The state of Texas has banned thought and ideas. Now they are trying to ban words. Florida wants to know what your political beliefs are. GOP controlled states want to make it difficult to vote. The @GOP is a cult of fascism. I left in 2018 and so can you. #LeaveTheGOP

====================

LucifersLiege23
@LucifersLiege23
·
21m
Replying to
@SykesCharlie

Very curious to see how they’ll navigate Texas’s past without using the word ‘colonialism’

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
2.1  Texan1211  replied to  JohnRussell @2    3 months ago

And I am curious as to when you will post something from someone who isn't a nut.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2.1.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Texan1211 @2.1    3 months ago

Try and address the seeded material if it is within your scope of thought. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
2.1.2  Texan1211  replied to  JohnRussell @2.1.1    3 months ago

I addressed my comment specifically to your post, JR.

The only way I am off topic is if you are.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2.1.3  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Texan1211 @2.1.2    3 months ago

So you have no thoughts on the seeded material. Ok. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
2.1.4  Texan1211  replied to  JohnRussell @2.1.3    3 months ago

So the tweet you posted stands as your "thoughts" on the topic.

Got it.

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Expert
2.2  Sean Treacy  replied to  JohnRussell @2    3 months ago

This tweet is q-anon level crazy.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2.2.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Sean Treacy @2.2    3 months ago

It appears that the Texas Public Policy Foundation wants to ban discussions of colonialism , multiculturalism, social justice,  inclusion  , and white supremacy from the states classrooms. 

I should think that would disturb parents. 

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
Professor Expert
2.2.2  Bob Nelson  replied to  JohnRussell @2.2.1    3 months ago
The Texas Public Policy Foundation ( TPPF ) is a conservative think tank based in Austin, Texas . [2] The organization was founded in 1989 by James R. Leininger , who sought intellectual support for his education reform ideas, including public school vouchers . [3] Projects of the organization include Right on Crime , which is focused on criminal justice reform, [4] and Fueling Freedom, which seeks to "explain the forgotten moral case for fossil fuels" [5] by rejecting the scientific consensus on climate change . [6]

In 2015, TPPF had total revenue of $10.8 million. [7] Donors to the organization include energy companies Chevron , ExxonMobil , and other fossil fuel interests. [8] The stated mission of TPPF is "to promote and defend liberty, personal responsibility, and free enterprise in Texas and the nation by educating and affecting policymakers and the Texas public policy debate with academically sound research and outreach." [9]

In 2018, TPPF opened an office in Washington, D.C.

Wikipedia  

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Expert
2.2.3  Sean Treacy  replied to  JohnRussell @2.2.1    3 months ago
Texas Public Policy Foundation wants to ban discussions of colonialism , multiculturalism, social justice,  inclusion  , and white supremacy from the states classrooms

Can you link to this banning of ideas by the State of Texas? 

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
Professor Expert
2.2.4  Bob Nelson  replied to  Sean Treacy @2.2.3    3 months ago

Google is your friend. Ten seconds. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2.2.5  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Sean Treacy @2.2.3    3 months ago

They have a graphic that lists specific components of what they identify as critical race theory. I listed some of them in the first comment and the others are in the seed. 

They do want to ban critical race theory dont they?  I dont think you are disputing that.

2+2

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2.2.6  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Bob Nelson @2.2.2    3 months ago

I read that one of the things this group wants to promote is "the moral case" for continued fossil fuel use. 

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Expert
2.2.7  Sean Treacy  replied to  JohnRussell @2.2.5    3 months ago

Please cite the law passed by the state of Texas that bans ideas, as your tweet claims.

I've seen a law passed by North Carolina that bans CRT. It forbids teachers from teaching :

(1) One race or sex is inherently superior to another race or sex.

(2) An individual, solely by virtue of his or her race or sex, is inherently racist, sexist, or oppressive, whether consciously or unconsciously.

(3) An individual should be discriminated against or receive adverse treatment solely or partly because of his or her race or sex.

(4) An individual’s moral character is necessarily determined by his or her race or sex.

(5) An individual, solely by virtue of his or her race or sex, bears responsibility for actions committed in the past by other members of the same race or sex.

(6) Any individual, solely by virtue of his or her race or sex, should feel discomfort, guilt, anguish, or any other form of psychological distress. […]

Which of these categories do you think should be taught to kids?

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2.2.8  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Sean Treacy @2.2.7    3 months ago

I dont vouch for every nuance of other peoples tweets, I post them because they add something to the NT discussion. 

I seeded the graphic posted on twitter that is from the Texas Public Policy Foundation, in which they claim to have identified aspects of critical race theory that might be taught in schools. 

Since they want to ban CRT we can assume they want to ban the identified aspects as well. 

The end. 

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
Professor Expert
2.2.9  Bob Nelson  replied to  JohnRussell @2.2.6    3 months ago
I read that one of the things this group wants to promote is "the moral case" for continued fossil fuel use.

Well of course! 

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Senior Principal
3  Nerm_L    3 months ago

CRT has become a generic label for a broader trend in education to shape social attitudes and moral judgements of students.

Religious training uses stories to impart social attitudes and moral beliefs to students.  The stories, themselves, are only a tool to shape moral beliefs and attitudes of students.  The stories are presented as fact but the purpose is to teach moral beliefs and shape attitudes. 

If a presentation of historical facts includes questions like 'how do you feel about that?' then the purpose is not to teach history.  If a presentation of historical facts includes assigning moral judgements to those facts then the purpose is not to teach history.  That's more akin to religious training.

If a student is given an assignment to write an essay about their life as a slave then the purpose is not to teach the history of slavery.  That's a method used by religion to use the story of Exodus to teach moral beliefs and shape attitudes.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
Professor Expert
3.1  Bob Nelson  replied to  Nerm_L @3    3 months ago
CRT has become a generic label for a broader trend in education to shape social attitudes and moral judgements of students.

That is to say, right-wingers use "CRT" to mean whatever they wish, ignoring the fact that it has been a clearly defined area of study for decades.

Another assault on rational conversation. 

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
PhD Guide
3.2  Thrawn 31  replied to  Nerm_L @3    3 months ago
If a presentation of historical facts includes questions like 'how do you feel about that?' then the purpose is not to teach history. 

That is so fucking wrong it is laughable. Historical facts by themselves are worthless.

Fact: The American Revolution began in 1775. 

Okay, and? Why should I give a shit? 

Its the questions asked ABOUT the facts that matter, the discussion around the significance of those facts. If you try to turn in an essay in a history class that just lists facts you will get an F because your paper is a pile of shit. It doesn't have a point. 

If a presentation of historical facts includes assigning moral judgements to those facts then the purpose is not to teach history. 

Sorry man, moral judgements are very much a part of history. 6 million Jews were murdered during the Holocaust, there is your fact. Again, the fact alone is meaningless but how do you discuss something like that without injecting some sort of morality into the discussion. Is that something we should avoid in the future, and why? There is no way to answer that without injecting your own personal morality into the answer. 

Your idea of a history class seems to be just a text book filled with bullet points and nothing else, which if that is the case then why bother teaching history at all?

If a student is given an assignment to write an essay about their life as a slave then the purpose is not to teach the history of slavery. 

Good thing you aren't a teacher. It seems critical thought is NOT a part of your desired curriculum. Besides, such an assignment wouldn't be to teach about slavery but rather to assess how much the students had absorbed about the practice of slavery. Obviously the expectation would be that they include material that had been covered in class. 

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
PhD Guide
4  Thrawn 31    3 months ago

Ummm, so what exactly are the kids going to be taught in school?

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
Professor Expert
4.1  Bob Nelson  replied to  Thrawn 31 @4    3 months ago

Football. 

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
Professor Expert
5  Bob Nelson    3 months ago

original

 
 
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