Parents vs progressives

  
By:  Vic Eldred  •  3 weeks ago  •  68 comments


Parents vs progressives
"Virginia’s made a big mistake," Lukas said. "[We’re going to] try to be noisy about what we want and we really want challenging -- and a focus on -- academics, not on politics."

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We the People


The state of Virginia has proposed to cancel advanced math options for students before eleventh grade to improve equity. The proposal will remove geometry and calculus as requirements and some students say this could leave them feeling unprepared for whatever the future holds.  For those who may not know, the word "equity" is now a form of newspeak. It's meaning has been altered to mean an equalization of results. Parents in the affluent region comprising northern Virginia know this. Many of them happen to be liberals. One thing they are not going to sacrifice is the education of their children. Not for any cause!

"[A]s currently planned, this initiative will eliminate ALL math acceleration prior to 11th grade," he said. "That is not an exaggeration, nor does there appear to be any discretion in how local districts implement this. All 6th graders will take Foundational Concepts 6. All 7th graders will take Foundational Concepts 7. All 10th graders will take Essential Concepts 10. Only in 11th and 12th grade is there any opportunity for choice in higher math courses."

Former Trump official and Loudoun parent Ian Prior  said  this effort will "stifle advancement for gifted students and set them back as they prepare for advanced mathematics in college. This is critical race theory in action and parents should be outraged."

https://townhall.com/tipsheet/leahbarkoukis/2021/04/23/virginia-schools--advanced-math-n2588441


Fortunately, (can we claim victory yet?) the Virginia Education Department appears to be backpedaling now, after announcing plans to overhaul the state's math curriculum, the department's website has been refomented to de-emphasize it's focus on "equity" education after they had made it the centerpiece of their initial plan. VED spokesperson James Lane claims that nothing is final, yet despite that less than reassuring comment, the specific item described as "improve equity in mathematics learning opportunities" is still listed on the VED website.

So is the VED really listening to parents or are they giving them a little false hope as they push through this initiative?

One final question:  Would this really give black and brown students a necessary leg up, or would barring students from taking accelerated courses will have the opposite effect?



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Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1  author  Vic Eldred    3 weeks ago

I submit: the battle for our children in the era of the left.


Trump and his supporters are off topic
I am off topic.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
1.1  Tessylo  replied to  Vic Eldred @1    3 weeks ago

What 'battle for our children in the era of the left'?

What does that mean?

It makes no sense.

 
 
 
XXJefferson51
Senior Guide
1.1.1  XXJefferson51  replied to  Tessylo @1.1    3 weeks ago

It means this: 

Cartoon of the Day
mrz042721dapr-1.jpg&width=700&compression=80
 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
1.2  Tessylo  replied to  Vic Eldred @1    3 weeks ago

What does this mean?  'Parents versus progressives'?

Did you just make that up?

Progressives want what's best for all, not just some.  

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
1.3  Kathleen  replied to  Vic Eldred @1    3 weeks ago

It’s a shame. You need the harder classes to prepare you for college. How about studying and paying attention in class, or just showing up. 

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
1.3.1  Tessylo  replied to  Kathleen @1.3    3 weeks ago

Who said they weren't studying and paying attention in class or 'not' showing up?

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
1.3.2  Kathleen  replied to  Tessylo @1.3.1    3 weeks ago

I did.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.3.3  author  Vic Eldred  replied to  Kathleen @1.3    3 weeks ago

The good part is that we the people are finally recognizing it and standing up for our kids!

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
1.3.4  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3.3    3 weeks ago
standing up for our kids!

I think decent parents have always stood up for their children Vic.

Parents of both political parties.

My thinking is, offer the more advanced classes as an option to the students that can understand and master those classes.

But making advanced classes mandatory for graduation will keep many average students (like I was) from getting a highschool diploma possibly setting them up for failure that our government may end up helping to support. In one way or another. 

Not everyone is Einstein, including students, parents, administrators or teachers and we can't force them to be. 

Options ! 

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.3.5  author  Vic Eldred  replied to  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu @1.3.4    3 weeks ago
I think decent parents have always stood up for their children Vic.

That's simply not true. Too many parents have trusted educators. I'm happy to say that "times are a changing." (words from a slimeball melody)


My thinking is, offer the more advanced classes as an option to the students that can understand and master those classes.

Yes, leave it the way it is.


But making advanced classes mandatory for graduation will keep many average students (like I was) from getting a highschool diploma possibly setting them up for failure that our government may end up helping to support. In one way or another. 

Making advanced classes mandatory for graduation?  That has never been a requirement nor is it the question here. As a matter of fact, here we have the exact opposite - denying advanced classes so that everyone comes out the same AKA "equity."

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
1.3.6  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3.5    3 weeks ago
Making advanced classes mandatory for graduation?

Vic, I'm pretty sure algebra was a requirement to graduate when I was in school. But our teachers were lets say "flexible" I believe I was "Passed" with a D even though as I said I had no clue.

Our highschool had a great auto mechanics shop class and we serviced many of the teachers vehicles. I worked on their cars. I graduated. Go figure. 

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
1.3.7  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3.5    3 weeks ago
Too many parents have trusted educators.
Certainly not all of them.

For more than 120 years,  National Parent Teacher Association (National PTA®) has worked toward bettering the lives of every child in education, health and safety. Founded in 1897 

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
1.3.8  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3.5    3 weeks ago
denying advanced classes so that everyone comes out the same AKA "equity."

Well yeah that's just dumb and I disagree with doing that just as much as I disagree with making schools too hard to graduate from. 

As I said I'm pretty sure algebra was a required subject when I was in high school. 

IMO: Advanced classes should be an Option. As an option I would think the classes would be small enough to welcome all that wanted and thought they could handle them. 

I know In my small town high school they would have been ! jrSmiley_84_smiley_image.gif lol 

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.3.9  author  Vic Eldred  replied to  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu @1.3.8    3 weeks ago
As I said I'm pretty sure algebra was a required subject when I was in high school. 

So you are categorizing Algebra as an advanced class. Now I understand.

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
1.3.10  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3.9    3 weeks ago

Good cause I doubt I'm alone. 

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.3.11  author  Vic Eldred  replied to  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu @1.3.10    3 weeks ago

I recall that many thought Algebra was a form of torture.

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
1.3.12  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3.11    3 weeks ago
I recall that many thought Algebra was a form of torture.

jrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gif    Funny stuff !!

If I had not gotten my diploma because of Algebra, I would have agreed. 

 
 
 
Eat The Press Do Not Read It
Junior Expert
1.3.13  Eat The Press Do Not Read It  replied to  Tessylo @1.3.1    2 weeks ago

God spoke!

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
1.3.14  Kathleen  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3.3    2 weeks ago

I think it’s important to prepare all these students for college. College is a lot harder then high school and you don’t want them to drop out or give up. 

Push yourself and you will be happy you did it. 

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.3.15  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu @1.3.4    2 weeks ago
My thinking is, offer the more advanced classes as an option to the students that can understand and master those classes.

But making advanced classes mandatory for graduation will keep many average students (like I was) from getting a highschool diploma possibly setting them up for failure that our government may end up helping to support. In one way or another. 

Not everyone is Einstein, including students, parents, administrators or teachers and we can't force them to be. 

Options ! 

100% AGREE!!!

I didn't take algebra in HS, because I could never pass PRE-Algebra!!! I had to take algebra when I returned to school and if my prof hadn't seen how much effort I put in, I'd have NEVER passed. She gave me a B even though I struggled SO HARD. However, my degree didn't require me to understand how to factor the square of a quadratic equation. My degree required me to understand basic statistical analysis, forecasting, and accounting; I got As in all of those that I needed for my degree.

You want to know what math I use every day? Financial / accounting and measurements in its several forms [square footage of a room, TBSP, TSP, Cups, Pints, Liters, etc.]. You know what many kids DON'T know how to do today?

  • Figure out the measurements for making meals or baking if they want to double or cut a recipe,
  • Balance a checkbook,
  • Figure out how much their mortgage will be based on APR, escrow, home cost, and insurance cost,
  • Preplan a bathroom remodel based on square footage, let alone know what materials they will need,
  • Figure out monthly cost of a car based on APR, vehicle cost, insurance cost, and MPG,
  • Determine which types of student loans will be best for their situation,
  • Determine which scholarships they should apply for by amount offered and if they qualify, and
  • How much school will actually cost based on interest and when they can actually start to pay on it.

That's another thing... these kids need to be taught their options of education far earlier than their junior or senior year. There's more than standard college! They also need to be taught what career path is flooded with people. What types of places are hiring? Is it going to be the same in 5 years, 10 years? Can the career you're planning on while in HS be replaced by a robot or any idiot out of HS... basically, kids need to be taught that in many careers, they ARE expendable and NOT special. Do you know how difficult it is for roofers and similar to find people? I had two of the roofing companies tell the adopted one that once he gets his driver's license, they have work for him that pays $20 / hour to START. DTE is hiring apprentices for the trades, because they can't wait for kids to go through those college courses on their own before applying. The Baby Boomers are all retiring. These places are struggling to replace the workers that were once journeymen or skilled laborers; they're now finally willing to pay someone to learn on the job again... something most companies weren't willing to do until PANIC... all of their journeymen are retiring without people to fill the spots, because what's pushed in HS? Standard college degrees.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.3.16  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.3.5    2 weeks ago
Making advanced classes mandatory for graduation?

Hilarious. My kids are currently in school. My 7th grade son was required to take pre-algebra this year. You know what that means? Algebra is a requirement next year. What comes after that? As soon as he starts HS, he will be required to take advanced algebra, then as a sophomore, pre-calculus IF he passes the advanced algebra class.

My daughter got lucky... she took machine shop, which covered her math credit in her Junior and Senior years. My son will probably do similar just so he doesn't have to take calculus. The adopted one did really well in math and took calculus and trig. Unless you know kids in middle or high school, you have no idea what they're being forced to take anymore.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.3.17  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu @1.3.10    2 weeks ago

You're not alone.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.3.18  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Kathleen @1.3.14    2 weeks ago

I disagree that college is a lot harder than HS. I BARELY passed HS. I graduated Summa Cum Laude from college.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.3.19  author  Vic Eldred  replied to  Kathleen @1.3.14    2 weeks ago

Those were out values once.

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
1.3.20  Kathleen  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @1.3.15    2 weeks ago

I tell my daughter that you don’t realize what you use on a day to day basis. Just yesterday I had to cut a recipe in half. Also measure the furniture. Also pick out colors. It’s amazing how much ch we do and learn everyday.

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
1.3.21  Kathleen  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @1.3.18    2 weeks ago

It’s okay to disagree, I had some trouble in high school myself. My daughter though, she feels college is a lot harder. 

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.3.22  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Kathleen @1.3.21    2 weeks ago
My daughter though, she feels college is a lot harder. 

I think it's quite dependent on the platform and type of degree they're going for, because I did all online, which was perfect for ME, but may not be for others. Some people are built better for face to face class platform. I had the "advantage" of already performing a lot of normal duties that my degree was geared toward. Unfortunately, I had to get a degree just to get further in my career.

If I'd have gotten a journeyman's card in something, I would NOT have had to do that. My circumstances are completely different from most people that are in college, and I realize that. If I'd have gone to college right out of HS, I'd have probably not done very well. More specifically, I didn't have a clue on what I would even go to college for back then. Everyone in my world are in trades. I just happened to choose the wrong trade to shoot for, but realistically it still helped me get to where I am today too. Paths definitely very as much as people do.

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Principal
1.4  Hallux  replied to  Vic Eldred @1    3 weeks ago

As usual the best/funniest part of your seeds is reading the comment sections within them. There was a 'great' section of a dozen or so posts as to who would hit the ground first after falling off a building, the black kid or the white kid ... and the winner was ... ?

 
 
 
Eat The Press Do Not Read It
Junior Expert
1.5  Eat The Press Do Not Read It  replied to  Vic Eldred @1    2 weeks ago

Mental Health professionals are recognizing that "being off TOPIC is healthy."

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.5.1  author  Vic Eldred  replied to  Eat The Press Do Not Read It @1.5    2 weeks ago

I suppose it's better than hurling Molotov cocktails. Good for them.

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
2  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu     3 weeks ago

Without doing any research on this my first thoughts are (remembering my own high school years) some of the math they tried to teach me was over my head. I never did get algebra and still don't. 

That said IMO: I don't think that a high school education should demand that every student learn everything every other student learns. If that is inequality well ... I don't believe every human is the same in every aspect. I know I can not do everything that many other humans can do nor am I as smart as some other humans are. I am not their equal in some areas. 

IMO: Not everyone can learn everything.  Having and expecting a reasonable average of what we know and expect the students to learn and understand to get grades and graduate seems reasonable and very worth while.

However, expecting everyone to learn everything is unrealistic. How I graduated without understanding a damn thing about algebra I don't know and don't care. But, if not understanding algebra would have kept me from getting a highschool diploma I would not have had the opportunities I have had to support myself all my life and may have ended up needing government help.

Again, However, Providing an opportunity in schools for more than the average capabilities of the average student as options to the required curriculum is also well worthwhile as well.

We need people smarter than I am... lol 

 
IMO: This is not a one size fits all world. 

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
2.1  Tessylo  replied to  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu @2    3 weeks ago

Damn right Steve!  Good thoughts!

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
2.1.1  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Tessylo @2.1    3 weeks ago

Thank you Tessylo 

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Masters Guide
2.2  Thrawn 31  replied to  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu @2    3 weeks ago

Agreed. I don't expect every student to be able to grasp something like calc, god knows it wasn't exactly easy for me, but that does not mean we should deny others the opportunity. Frankly if you are smart enough you should be in classes that reflect that regardless of age or grade. 

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
2.3  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu @2    2 weeks ago
I never did get algebra and still don't. 

Same here Steve.

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
2.4  Kathleen  replied to  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu @2    2 weeks ago

I had trouble with that too. I guess it all depends on your interests, some are more into mathematics and science and some are more into the arts. Me it is with the arts. 

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
2.4.1  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Kathleen @2.4    2 weeks ago
I guess it all depends on your interests,

So true and thankfully we are not all interested in the same thing(s) the fight would be deadly and nothing else would be developed.  

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Masters Guide
3  Greg Jones    3 weeks ago

Math is hard, and that's the point. It forces people to think.

afb042621dAPR20210426044504.jpg
 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
3.1  Tessylo  replied to  Greg Jones @3    3 weeks ago

What does this stupid cartoon have to do with anything?

What does it mean?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Masters Guide
3.1.1  Greg Jones  replied to  Tessylo @3.1    3 weeks ago

What do you think it means?

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
3.1.2  author  Vic Eldred  replied to  Tessylo @3.1    3 weeks ago
But making advanced classes mandatory for graduation will keep many average students (like I was) from getting a highschool diploma possibly setting them up for failure that our government may end up helping to support. In one way or another. 

I'd say that cartoon conveys the issue here perfectly.

 
 
 
Dismayed Patriot
PhD Participates
3.1.3  Dismayed Patriot  replied to  Tessylo @3.1    3 weeks ago
What does it mean?

The cartoon is indeed stupid because it does not accurately portray the difference between equality and equity and is apparently claiming that CRT (critical race theory) is somehow creating a hole from which those who already have an advantage must start from.

" Critical race theory (CRT) intellectual  movement and loosely organized framework of legal analysis based on the  premise  that  race  is not a natural, biologically grounded feature of physically distinct subgroups of human beings but a socially constructed (culturally invented) category that is used to oppress and exploit people of color. Critical race theorists hold that the law and legal institutions in the United States are inherently  racist  insofar as they function to create and maintain social, economic, and political inequalities between whites and nonwhites, especially  African Americans ."

Equity vs. Equality

Equity is defined as “the state, quality or ideal of being just, impartial and fair.” The concept of equity is synonymous with fairness and justice.  Equity involves trying to understand and give people what they need to enjoy full, healthy lives. Equality, in contrast, aims to ensure that everyone gets the same things in order to enjoy full, healthy lives. Like equity, equality aims to promote fairness and justice, but it can only work if everyone starts from the same place and needs the same things.

What the cartoon is trying to apparently claim is that under "equality" that means no special treatment for anyone and the fact that some have an advantage (in this case height advantage) like being born with a silver spoon, family wealth, connections, location advantages etc., should be ignored and accepted and shouldn't mean others should get any sort of additional help (i.e. affirmative action) to help them get to the same "view". The dumb ass who drew the cartoon is claiming, as many morons on the right do, that by giving preferential treatment to create equity then everybody somehow loses and no one gets a view. This is obviously ridiculous. Just because some who aren't born with the privileges afforded many white Americans, helping them get a spot in a University or college or making room for them in the job markets even though traditionally those college spots and jobs almost always went to those with a head start such as being white, from a wealthy family with connections and living in an elite place with every opportunity afforded them, it doesn't in any way slap the silver spoons out of their mouths or dig them into a hole they're unable to get out of.

If a University has room for 1000 students, equity is reserving a percentage of those for minorities that have been traditionally discriminated against, often the same percent that the minority makes up of the general population, so for black students it would be something like 140 spots or 14% of the 1000. So there are still 860 spots available for the wealthy privileged white kids, but if you're one of the parents of the 140 white kids who didn't get in because of the affirmative action then you feel as if something has been stolen from you. Of course, they only feel that way because they've always lived lives of privilege and feel entitled to those spots and anyone just handing them to underprivileged students to create "equity", well "equity" becomes a bad word and the bitter bigots who felt they were entitled to those spots draw stupid cartoons like the one above.

The reality of what should be depicted in the cartoon for "equality" is the white kid standing on three boxes and the other two minority kids standing in holes because that's a better representation of the starting point. Black Americans were denied the ability to build or create equity for hundreds of years, so when supposed "equality" came along in the form of the civil rights act and voting rights act, they were far behind their fellow white Americans in education, wealth and employment so just saying "Okay, now that we banned the discrimination all is equal now" is beyond ignorant. And the fact is that a lot of that white wealth (home ownership, financial legacies, educational legacies etc.) were literally built on the backs of slave labor or discriminatory labor practices for the previous 400 years. It will take a lot longer than just 60 years to overcome such inequity, but for some bitter bigots they will never accept that black Americans are worth the hand up and will continue to fight to keep them down claiming if they don't get a hand up as well then it's reverse racism. What they fail to recognize is the fact that for the preceding 400 years of American society we had effectively white affirmative action where they were the only ones allowed to go to most Universities and were the only ones allowed to work in certain jobs or get loans or live in certain areas.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
3.2  Texan1211  replied to  Greg Jones @3    3 weeks ago

boy, oh boy. now you'll have to explain that!

lmao!

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Masters Guide
3.3  Thrawn 31  replied to  Greg Jones @3    3 weeks ago

Holy shit, we agree on something! Finally a cartoon worth looking at.

I am all about equal opportunity but fuck the idea of equal outcomes. 

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
3.4  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Greg Jones @3    3 weeks ago

I notice that the children's heights didn't start out equal neither do children's ability to master subjects not everyone needs or can do advanced math and for those who try and can't understand it are they to be left behind ? 

Offer options for advanced classes but don't require advanced math for graduating !

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Masters Guide
3.4.1  Greg Jones  replied to  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu @3.4    3 weeks ago

Did you notice that no one can now "see over the fence" due to lowered standards.

Branco gave the message brilliantly on this one

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
3.4.2  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Greg Jones @3.4.1    3 weeks ago
Did you notice that no one can now "see over the fence" due to lowered standards.

Of Course but the non reality starts where everyone can see over the fence. That is not true.

As I stated before we are actually not all equal to begin with. 

IMO: Advanced classes should be offered to everyone but required by no one and advanced classes should not be a requirement for a diploma. 

Not everyone's a genius. But those that are can learn more that those who are not. Focus on the students that can handle the advanced classes and they will probably go even further without students that can't handle the advanced classes in the way. 

I went back to a community college not long ago . It was easy to see who got it and those who just were along for the ride. Some of those that didn't get it did little more for the rest except to disrupt the class anyway.

I am pretty observant , I looked some of the ones not caring and not getting it were not paying for their own education either. A big reason I am against free college.

 

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
4  Buzz of the Orient    3 weeks ago

Yet another step along the path to the dumbing down of America.  It's no wonder so many Americans believe in conspiracy theories and obviously fake news.  When we were teenagers in high school, during summer vacation we would mix with the students from Buffalo at Crystal Beach, Ontario, on the north shore of Lake Erie just west of the Niagara River that is the border between Canada and the USA.  It was incredible for us to hear the American students bitch about the fact that they only got 97 or 98 on their final exams when others got the gold star mark of 100%, when we Canadians had to struggle to get a 75% honours grade.  That was my first lesson in the quality of American education.  In our final year of high school it was necessary to pass 9 subjects - English literature, French, HIstory, Chemistry, Physics, Algebra, Geometry, Trigonometry, and a chosen option. Calculus was a 1st year university subject,  We had a standing joke back then that you could take a course in Basket Weaving at the University of Miami, but what isn't a joke is what Bill Mahar said about courses taught NOW in America: "'The Philosophy of Star Trek,'The Sociology of Seinfeld,' and 'Surviving the Coming Zombie Apocalypse'. Now THAT should tell you something. 

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Principal
4.1  Hallux  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @4    3 weeks ago

I got an F in Sociology of Seinfeld ... the zombies ate my homework.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
5  Tessylo    3 weeks ago

What dumbing down of America?

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
5.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Tessylo @5    3 weeks ago

Foundational Concepts???  Essential Concepts???  'The Philosophy of Star Trek,'The Sociology of Seinfeld,' and 'Surviving the Coming Zombie Apocalypse', and in my opinion, Affirmative Action.  Sports scholarships that take the seats from brilliant creative students. 

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
5.1.1  Tessylo  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @5.1    3 weeks ago

I disagree.  I'm moving on.

Why are you typing everything in a larger font and in bold?  

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
5.1.2  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Tessylo @5.1.1    3 weeks ago

It/s not bold, it's standard 14 pt, one up from the standard 12 pt you use.  I use 14 pt so that I can read over clearly what I have typed, since I'm 84 years old and happen to be losing my vision and it's difficult for me to read the 12 pt font and sometimes have to use a magnifying glass.  I apologize if it's inconvenient for you. 

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
5.1.3  Tessylo  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @5.1.2    3 weeks ago

Sorry.  I'm in a petty mood this morning.  You can ignore me if you like.  

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
5.1.4  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Tessylo @5.1.3    3 weeks ago

Apology accepted.  I don't ignore my friends.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
6  Tessylo    3 weeks ago

"Former Trump official and Loudoun parent Ian Prior   said   this effort will "stifle advancement for gifted students and set them back as they prepare for advanced mathematics in college. This is critical race theory in action and parents should be outraged."

So what?  Who is he?

What does this mean?

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Principal
6.1  Hallux  replied to  Tessylo @6    3 weeks ago

'Critical race theory' is the latest hammer in the Trumpanista toolbox, it makes everything they don't like look like a nail. Don't fret about it, they don't even like themselves.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
6.1.1  Tessylo  replied to  Hallux @6.1    3 weeks ago

Like woke, and cancel culture, and social justice warrior - all made up shit?

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Masters Guide
6.2  Thrawn 31  replied to  Tessylo @6    3 weeks ago

While I am not sure what the critical race thing has to do with anything, I definitely think it is fucking stupid to hold back the smartest of us. I don't want the smart kids to have to do easy shit, all that does is send them the message that they don't really have to try or put forward much effort. If they are smart enough to do calculus as a freshman then let them.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
7  Tessylo    3 weeks ago

Parents in the affluent region comprising northern Virginia know this. Many of them happen to be liberals. One thing they are not going to sacrifice is the education of their children. Not for any cause!

Know what?  What difference does it make if many of them 'happen to be liberals'?

What does that mean and what does it have to do with it?

If they're so affluent, why don't they send them to private schools?

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
7.1  Tessylo  replied to  Tessylo @7    3 weeks ago

Like that moronic private school in Floriduh where anyone who has been vaccinated against Co-Vid can't teach there.  No masks.  No nothing.  What absolute moron would send their kids to that school?

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
7.1.1  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu   replied to  Tessylo @7.1    3 weeks ago
What absolute moron would send their kids to that school?

parents who don't really want kids maybe ? 

    jrSmiley_91_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
8  Texan1211    3 weeks ago

Good for parents sticking up for their kids.

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Participates
9  Sean Treacy    3 weeks ago

More insanity.  Penalizing smarter kids in the name of racism. 

 
 
 
321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu
Sophomore Principal
10  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu     3 weeks ago

What is all this LOCKED on this thread about ? 

Makes no sense. 

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
10.1  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  321steve - realistically thinkin or Duu @10    2 weeks ago

I was wondering the same thing.

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Masters Guide
11  Thrawn 31    3 weeks ago
"[A]s currently planned, this initiative will eliminate ALL math acceleration prior to 11th grade," he said. "That is not an exaggeration, nor does there appear to be any discretion in how local districts implement this. All 6th graders will take Foundational Concepts 6. All 7th graders will take Foundational Concepts 7. All 10th graders will take Essential Concepts 10. Only in 11th and 12th grade is there any opportunity for choice in higher math courses."

That is fucking dumb. If a kid is smart enough to take trig or calc as a freshman then let them. I had finished all my required math classes for graduation by the end of my sophomore year (geometry, algebra 2, trig, and calc). When I was in 6th grade there was one kid who was taking his math classes at the local community college because that was the only place that offered the courses at the level he was at. Don't punish smart kids so dumb kids don't feel as dumb. If anything they should be pouring more resources into nurturing the best among us. 

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
11.1  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Thrawn 31 @11    2 weeks ago

Although, I'm with Steve on this one... don't force those of us that really don't get it to be required to take it to graduate either. I've always been an advocate for helping kids advance their talents; while that's usually not realized until HS, I was pretty good at honing in on my kids' talents a bit earlier, then again, I pay attention.

Neither of my kids are math whizzes. My daughter is a wonderful artist [drawing, painting, piano [self-taught], guitar [self-taught], and any wind instruments], but she is really good at welding, creatively repurposing things / redesigning, using a CNC, minor coding, and thrives in an organized chaotic environment... so she took machine shop and is planning on going to school for HVAC.

My son... we haven't completely figured him out yet. He's at the age that he's full of testosterone, piss and vinegar (almost 13 and going through puberty) and only wants to play video games, but he's passing his classes. While he says he doesn't understand several things... I suspect sometimes that he's trying to get others to do his work for him. I think most kids go through a phase like that in some way. I know I did.

My son is really good at deductive reasoning though. He loved doing the criminal investigation project in Boy Scouts. There's a class geared toward those things in our district, so that may be something that he gets into, detective / criminal investigating. He even loves watching CSI, NCIS, and Law & Order SVU with me. He loves playing Clue and he's really good at it. He loves playing chess, he's okay at it, especially for his age. So, strategy and deductive reasoning are his strong suits. 

Point is though... for HVAC and Criminal Investigation, there's no need for calculus or trigonometry; hell, I don't see a need for algebra for either of those really. Geometry is needed in both though. 

 
 
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