Citizenship, the Census and Obama

  
Via:  don-overton  •  one month ago  •  19 comments

Citizenship, the Census and Obama
Memes circulating online claim that former President Barack Obama removed the citizenship question from the 2010 census

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



Amazing how much the right wing republicans lie so much

The Trump administration’s fight to add a question about citizenship to the 2020 census was lost in June when the Supreme Court ruled that the administration had concealed the reason it sought to add the question. The majority ruled that the administration gave a “contrived,” rather than “genuine,” justification for the question, and thus barred it from being included in the decennial census.

The issue, though, is still being debated and an error has been widely introduced into that debate on social media. Several different memes are circulating online based on the false claim that former President Barack Obama removed the citizenship question from the 2010 census.

One popular version of the claim is from Charlie Kirk, founder of the young conservative group Turning Point USA. His tweet has been liked more than 75,000 times and turned into a meme on Facebook. Kirk wrote: “If Barack Obama was able to remove the Citizenship Question from the census in 2010 without Supreme Court approval Why does President Trump need their approval to put it back on?”

But Obama didn’t remove the citizenship question from the census.

Explaining how the misconception developed requires some background.

Starting at the beginning, the Constitution mandates that the U.S. population be counted every 10 years in order to determine the number of representatives each state should have and to distribute federal funds. The next decennial census is in 2020.

As the country’s population grew, the complexity of the census also grew. In 1940, the Census Bureau, for the first time, used sampling as a way to get more detailed information about the population without overburdening all residents with too many questions. That year it sent additional questions to just 5 percent of the population and used statistical techniques to broaden the results. By 1970, the bureau was sending out a short-form questionnaire to every U.S. household and a long-form supplement with more detailed questions to a fraction of U.S. households.

In 1997, the bureau outlined a plan to eliminate the long-form questionnaire after 2000 and replace it with the American Community Survey, which would be sent out to a small sample of households every year instead of once every 10 years. In 2005, the bureau started using that survey — which U.S. residents are required by law to answer, just as they are required to answer the census.

That background is important for understanding where the citizenship questions have been asked.

Here’s how it has been handled since 1820, the first year that a citizenship question was included:

  • 1820 — The country’s fourth census asked this question of each household in the U.S.: “Number of foreigners not naturalized.” The following census in 1830 included a variationon that question.
  • 1840 — The citizenship question wasn’t asked this year. It wasn’t included in 1850 or 1860, either, although those questionnaires did ask about a person’s “place of birth,” a question that the government would continue to ask, in some form, through today.
  • 1870 — The first census following the Civil War asked two specific citizenship questions: “Is the person a male citizen of the United States of 21 years or upwards?” and “Is the person a male citizen of the United States of 21 years or upwards whose right to vote is denied or abridged on grounds other than ‘rebellion or other crime?'”
  • 1880 — The census did not include any citizenship questions.
  • 1890 — The citizenship question returned this year, asking: “Is the person naturalized?” That question remained in the next four questionnaires, adding the phrase “or an alien” in 19101920 and 1930 
  • 1940 — The census included this question: “If foreign born, is the person a citizen?” The 1950 census included the same question.
  • 1960 — This census did not include a citizenship question.
  • 1970 — The short-form questionnaire sent to every household did not include a citizenship question, but the supplemental long-form questionnaire sent to some households asked: “For persons born in a foreign country- Is the person naturalized?” The 1980 census handled the question in a similar manner.
  • 1990 — The short-form questionnaire sent to every household again did not ask about citizenship, but the long form sent to some households asked: “Is this person a citizen of the United States?” The same was true for the 2000 census.
  • 2005 — The first American Community Survey was sent out with this question: “Is this person a citizen of the United States?”
  • 2010 — The decennial census sent to every U.S. household did not include a citizenship question, like all of the short-form questionnaires since 1960. The American Community Survey, which had replaced the long-form census, included the same citizenship question as it did in 2005 and continues to today.

As the timeline shows, Obama did not remove the citizenship question from the census.

Plans to replace the long-form questionnaire with the American Community Survey were underway during the Clinton administration and the shift happened during the Bush administration. The 2010 census that occurred during the Obama administration handled the citizenship question the same way it had been since 1970; there was no citizenship question on the short-form questionnaire sent to every U.S. household, but a citizenship question was asked on the supplemental form sent out to a smaller sample of households.

Editor’s note: FactCheck.org is one of several organizations working with Facebook to debunk misinformation shared on social media. Our previous stories can be found here.

Sources

Department of Commerce v. New York. No. 18–966. Supreme Court of the U.S. 27 Jun 2019.

U.S. Census Bureau. Index of Questions. Accessed 11 Jul 2019.

U.S. Census Bureau. “The American Community Survey: The Census Bureau’s Plan to Provide Timely 21st Century Data.” 1997.

U.S. Census Bureau. American Community Survey (ACS) Questionnaire Archive. Accessed 11 Jul 2019.





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"If Barack Obama was able to remove the Citizenship Question from the Census in 2010 without Supreme Court approval Why does President Trump need their approval to put it back on?"

Wednesday, July 10, 2019


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Galen Marvin Ross
1  Galen Marvin Ross    one month ago
Starting at the beginning, theConstitutionmandates that the U.S. population be counted every 10 years in order to determine the number of representatives each state should have and to distribute federal funds. The next decennial census is in 2020.

If your ok with adding a citizenship question to the Census then you must be ok with not being represented in Washington in the House of Representatives because, that is what will happen in some areas if the question is asked and, not everyone fills out the questionnaire, some areas will lose the right to representation in Congress. 

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1  XDm9mm  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @1    one month ago
some areas will lose the right to representation in Congress. 

So, you're admitting that "some areas" are so overrun by illegal alien invaders that they skew the census in their favor?

Oh, even if the question is asked, does not mean one has to answer it.  A lie on the form is illegal, refusing to answer a question apparently is not.

 
 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
1.1.1  Galen Marvin Ross  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1    one month ago
So, you're admitting that "some areas" are so overrun by illegal alien invaders that they skew the census in their favor?

Nothing of the sort, if that is what you are reading between the lines then you need better glasses. I said on here a while back that if Trump and, Wilber put that question on the Census, I wouldn't answer myself, it's a stupid question and, has nothing to do with the Census, never has.

 
 
 
Ronin2
1.1.2  Ronin2  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @1.1.1    one month ago
Nothing of the sort, if that is what you are reading between the lines then you need better glasses.

Then the left shouldn't care if the question is on the form or not. If it has nothing to do with increasing the amount of votes sanctuary states receive. The number of members electoral college and House should be base on US citizens only, not the just the over all population of the state.

I said on here a while back that if Trump and, Wilber put that question on the Census, I wouldn't answer myself, it's a stupid question and, has nothing to do with the Census, never has.

Neither did all of the jackass questions about what type of dwelling you lived in- if you own or rented, age, race, etc on the 2010 form; but I remember having to fill it all out.

Here is a copy for those with short term memories.

https://www.census.gov/2010census/pdf/2010_Questionnaire_Info.pdf

 
 
 
It Is ME
1.1.3  It Is ME  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @1.1.1    one month ago
I said on here a while back that if Trump and, Wilber put that question on the Census, I wouldn't answer myself, it's a stupid question and, has nothing to do with the Census, never has.

Better not answer the race question either. It's sooooo race-ist….Useable by Politicians, and Fucking STUPID !

 
 
 
Don Overton
1.1.4  seeder  Don Overton  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1    one month ago

Your bullshit comment is nothing more than bigotry AW

 
 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
1.1.5  Galen Marvin Ross  replied to  Ronin2 @1.1.2    one month ago
Then the left shouldn't care if the question is on the form or not. If it has nothing to do with increasing the amount of votes sanctuary states receive. The number of members electoral college and House should be base on US citizens only, not the just the over all population of the state.

Again, you need better glasses. Part of the purpose of the Census is to get an ACCURATE reading of the POPULATION, not to find out who is a citizen, the population includes EVERYONE living in an area, that includes minority's and, immigrants, legal or, not, this information is then used to make sure an area is properly represented in the Congress, what Trump is trying to do is "gerrymander" the census so that certain areas are not represented in Washington.

Neither did all of the jackass questions about what type of dwelling you lived in- if you own or rented, age, race, etc on the 2010 form; but I remember having to fill it all out.

Those question determine how much money is allocated to certain areas and, what the population of that area is as far as poor, middle class or, wealthy.

 
 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
1.1.6  Galen Marvin Ross  replied to  It Is ME @1.1.3    one month ago
Better not answer the race question either. It's sooooo race-ist….Useable by Politicians, and Fucking STUPID !

Again, this is to determine the makeup of an area, what the population is as far as ethnicity.  My wife and, I didn't mind filling out that portion on the last census because we knew it would show diversity in the area.

 
 
 
It Is ME
1.1.7  It Is ME  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @1.1.6    one month ago
Again, this is to determine the makeup of an area, what the population is as far as ethnicity.

Why ?

Does one get more than another because of it ?

I thought we were all supposed to be "EQUAL". "ONE NATION" as they say !

 
 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
1.1.8  Galen Marvin Ross  replied to  It Is ME @1.1.7    one month ago
Why ?

Does one get more than another because of it ?

I thought we were all supposed to be "EQUAL". "ONE NATION" as they say !

Stupid response

 
 
 
Texan1211
1.1.9  Texan1211  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @1.1.6    one month ago

What difference does it make what the ethnic makeup of a neighborhood is? 

Answer: NONE

 
 
 
It Is ME
1.1.10  It Is ME  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @1.1.8    one month ago
Stupid response

Really now !

Am I a racist besides ?

 
 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
1.1.11  Galen Marvin Ross  replied to  It Is ME @1.1.10    one month ago
Am I a racist besides ?

I don't know are you? Do you support a president who has proven he is a racist and, do you support the idea that only "citizens" can be counted on the census, even though that is not what the SCOTUS has said? Do you support telling citizens who disagree with the president and, his policies to "go back where they came from", if those citizens are brown or, black?

 
 
 
It Is ME
1.1.12  It Is ME  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @1.1.11    one month ago

If you can check the "Race" box without misgivings, you surely can check the box "Citizen" with the SAME lack of misgiving you had of the later !

For "ME".... anyway …… I'm not a "Race", I'm just an "American", and a Proud Citizen of "This Country" too !

 
 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
1.1.13  Galen Marvin Ross  replied to  It Is ME @1.1.12    one month ago

And, none of the questions answered that I asked, sigh, why do I bother.

 
 
 
Tessylo
1.1.14  Tessylo  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @1.1.8    one month ago

'Stupid response'

That's all he's got.

 
 
 
It Is ME
1.1.15  It Is ME  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @1.1.13    one month ago

So your more about "Race" than being a "Citizen" ?

 
 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
1.1.16  Galen Marvin Ross  replied to  It Is ME @1.1.15    4 weeks ago
So your more about "Race" than being a "Citizen" ?

When it comes to the census, whether you are a citizen doesn't matter, it's about POPULATION.

 
 
 
It Is ME
1.1.17  It Is ME  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @1.1.16    4 weeks ago
When it comes to the census, whether you are a citizen doesn't matter, it's about POPULATION.

Using YOUR OWN comment, the "Race" box should be taken off the census then …. shouldn't it ?

 
 
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