Antarctica registers hottest temperature ever at nearly 65 degrees Fahrenheit

  
Via:  john-russell  •  2 weeks ago  •  34 comments

Antarctica registers hottest temperature ever at nearly 65 degrees Fahrenheit
Scientists say that they see no end to the way climate change continues to shatter temperature records across the world, including in Antarctica, which is one of the fastest-warming regions in the world.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T






Antarctica just set its hottest temperature ever recorded at 64.9 degrees Fahrenheit as climate change   continues to accelerate ,   according to measurements   from an Argentinian research station thermometer.

The reading was taken at the Esperanza Base along Antarctica’s Trinity Peninsula on Thursday. It beats the continent’s previous record of 63.5 degrees tallied in March 2015, and comes shortly after the Earth saw its hottest January on record and hottest decade on record in the 2010s.

Scientists say that they see no end to the way climate change continues to shatter temperature records across the world, including in Antarctica, which is one of the fastest-warming regions in the world.

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Antarctica’s record-breaking temperature has not yet been verified by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), which will have a committee confirm the new Esperanza record.

“Everything we have seen thus far indicates a likely legitimate record, but we will of course begin a formal evaluation of the record once we have full data from SMN and on the meteorological conditions surrounding the event,” said WMO’s Weather and Climate Extremes rapporteur Randall Cerveny.

Research shows that Antarctica’s glaciers are rapidly melting as the planet warms, releasing enough water to significantly raise global sea levels. The amount of ice lost each year from the Antarctic ice sheet increased at least sixfold between 1979 and 2017, according to the WMO.

Roughly 87% of glaciers along the west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula have retreated over the last half-century, with most showing an accelerated retreat in the last 12 years. The peninsula is expected to see additional extreme warmth in the upcoming days.





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JohnRussell
1  seeder  JohnRussell    2 weeks ago
“We’ve been in the Antarctic for the last month, documenting the dramatic changes this part of the world is undergoing as our planet warms,” she said in an email. “In the last month, we’ve seen penguin colonies sharply declining under the impacts of climate change in this supposedly pristine environment.” https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2020-02-07/it-s-t-shirt-weather-in-antarctica-as-temperature-breaks-record
 
 
 
WallyW
1.1  WallyW  replied to  JohnRussell @1    2 weeks ago

Scientists say that they see no end to the way climate change continues to shatter temperature records across the world, including in Antarctica, which is one of the fastest-warming regions in the world.

I have agree with these scientists. After all, it's the middle of summer down there.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
1.1.1  r.t..b...  replied to  WallyW @1.1    2 weeks ago
I have agree with these scientists. After all, it's the middle of summer down there.

The opening sentence is an accurate assessment in acknowledging scientific fact. The closing sentence is simply nonsensical. 

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.1.2  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  r.t..b... @1.1.1    2 weeks ago

He is correct in that it is the summer down there. Actually, February is the end of the Austral summer season. Seasons in the very Southern hemisphere are reversed from the Northern hemisphere.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
1.1.3  Greg Jones  replied to  r.t..b... @1.1.1    2 weeks ago

When the scientists said there is no way to end climate change...they were being honest and truthful. In regards to Wally's statement being nonsensical, the Southen Hemisphere had its Summer Solstice back in December. Warmest average temps occur about a month after the Solstice in either hemisphere 

 
 
 
r.t..b...
1.1.4  r.t..b...  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @1.1.2    2 weeks ago
He is correct in that it is the summer down there.

The 65 degree mark was three below the high temp in Phoenix yesterday, seasonal variations notwithstanding. You've been there, Doc...it is not congruent within any normal circumstance as confirmed by scientific data.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
1.1.5  r.t..b...  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1.3    2 weeks ago
Warmest average temps occur about a month after the Solstice in either hemisphere 

Then why isn't 65 the norm?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
1.1.6  Greg Jones  replied to  r.t..b... @1.1.4    2 weeks ago

...it is not congruent within any normal circumstance as confirmed by scientific data.

You're forgetting about the Jet Steam and the upper air patterns. Alaska and the Arctic can get quite during our winter because of these upper winds and these variations are not all that unusual. But getting back to basics....tell us how we can end climate change.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
1.1.7  r.t..b...  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1.6    2 weeks ago
tell us how we can end climate change.

The first step, Greg, is in acknowledging it exists. Since it is a global problem, the second step would be gathering the global community in taking steps to address the situation.

But wait...that has been done and signed onto by the vast majority of countries, the U.S. included, that is until we stepped off. 

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.1.8  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1.6    2 weeks ago

In Antarctica, they are known as Katabatic Winds. These are cyclonic force wind storms that circle the continent of Antarctica and ultimately affect the weather patterns in much of the rest of the world.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
1.1.9  Greg Jones  replied to  r.t..b... @1.1.7    2 weeks ago

Why didn't the US ratify the Kyoto Protocol Agreement, back in the day?

The gist of the Paris Agreement amounted to the US paying large sums of money to polluting nations until they got around to taking steps to clean up their own air. The targets were very flexible and there were no means of enforcement.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.10  XDm9mm  replied to  r.t..b... @1.1.7    2 weeks ago
tell us how we can end climate change.
The first step, Greg, is in acknowledging it exists. Since it is a global problem, the second step would be gathering the global community in taking steps to address the situation. But wait...that has been done and signed onto by the vast majority of countries, the U.S. included, that is until we stepped off. 

Ok...   I'll be a little more direct.

Tell us how we can change what "nature" does and has done before we even existed?  And will very likely continue to do long after we cease to exist?

I'd personally be more inclined to investigate ways we might be able to survive as a species when the inevitable and unstoppable climatic change occurs.  There is that thing which science knows occurred, the glacial/inter-glacial periods before us.  Since they are in fact unstoppable forces of nature, would not developing ways to survive be more intelligent and intellectually honest?

 
 
 
r.t..b...
1.1.11  r.t..b...  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1.9    2 weeks ago
the Paris Agreement amounted to the US

...taking a leadership role, as no other country has the wherewithal to do. To lead by example, a truly American birthright, has been temporarily stymied by the unilateral retribution agenda of the current administration.

No metaphorical wall, regardless of who is slated to pay for it, will keep us from experiencing the deleterious effects of that we are willing to ignore for temporary political expediency. 

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.12  XDm9mm  replied to  r.t..b... @1.1.11    2 weeks ago
..taking a leadership role, as no other country has the wherewithal to do.

In other words, we pay, they take.

Thanks for the admission.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
1.1.13  r.t..b...  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.10    2 weeks ago
Since they are in fact unstoppable forces of nature

....less so Mother Nature and more to the nature of our species...

"I'd like to share a revelation I've had during my time here. It came to me when I tried to classify your species. I realized that you're not actually mammals. Every mammal on this planet instinctively develops a natural equilibrium with their surrounding environment, but you humans do not. You move to another area, and you multiply, and you multiply, until every natural resource is consumed. The only way you can survive is to spread to another area. There is another organism on this planet that follows the same pattern. Do you know what it is? A virus. Human beings are a disease, a cancer of this planet. You are a plague..."   ~Agent Smith from "The Matrix"

Perhaps our fate is cast in our inability to adapt...in our vanity and our willful ignorance.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.14  XDm9mm  replied to  r.t..b... @1.1.13    2 weeks ago
....less so Mother Nature and more to the nature of our species...

Our species is what it is.   We've essentially evolved over time.  Of course, other species before us, actually better suited for the environments they lived in, have ceased to exist and have been replaced.  We will likely be replaced as well, or simply cease in all manner.   It's the natural course of things.  Accept it or not, it will happen and you cannot change it.

Perhaps our fate is cast in our inability to adapt.

So you're finally acknowledging the inevitable?   Welcome to the real world.

 
 
 
r.t..b...
1.1.15  r.t..b...  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.14    2 weeks ago
So you're finally acknowledging the inevitable?   Welcome to the real world.

For the sake of my children and if they should one day have children of their own, I would hope we could at least give them a starting point in which to change the self-serving behavior our generation and those we learned from have left them to clean up.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.16  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.14    2 weeks ago

If the climate "alarmists" are right, by the end of this century much of the United States will experience extreme heat (100 degrees +) for at least part of the year.  The south and southwest regions will have extreme heat for most nearly all of the year. Is this what you want for the nations grandchildren and great grandchildren who are coming up at that time? 

Maybe by then there will be personalized air conditioning wired into everyones daily clothing. 

Progress!

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.17  XDm9mm  replied to  r.t..b... @1.1.15    2 weeks ago
For the sake of my children and if they should one day have children of their own, I would hope we could at least give them a starting point in which to change the self-serving behavior our generation and those we learned from have left them to clean up.

I would hope that we actually accept what has previously happened will happen again, as it has before and put our efforts into finding ways our species can exist in the environment that will come.

We can piss and moan about climate change all day every day, but we will never be able to stop what nature has and will continue to do.  We're really not that smart nor powerful enough to "fool mother nature".

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.18  XDm9mm  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.16    2 weeks ago
If the climate "alarmists" are right, by the end of this century much of the United States will experience extreme heat (100 degrees +) for at least part of the year. 

Maybe you haven't been watching any local or national weather broadcasts, but we already have that.

The south and southwest regions will have extreme heat for most nearly all of the year.

You ARE aware are you not, that at one point in the history of this space we call North America, it was covered with about two miles of ice, and at another time dense tropical growth.

Is this what you want for the nations grandchildren and great grandchildren who are coming up at that time? 

I'll be candid and note that I'm actually hoping that we as a species will finally realize that we can't change nature, and pursue a means and methods of learning how to cope and survive what is the inevitable.

Maybe by then there will be personalized air conditioning wired into everyones daily clothing. 

Or, personal heaters, predicated on what comes.  Per historical eras, we should be entering a cooling period.  But we might experience a heat spike just prior to that.

Progress!

Or, the entire planet essentially in the dark if a coronal mass hits us like the one that did in 1859.  We did have a near miss in 2012, so you know they happen.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.19  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.18    2 weeks ago

I think they are talking about year round temperatures in the south of over 100 degrees every day. No one will want to live there. 

The extreme heat will encompass all of the United States, although there will still be periods of relative cool in the northern regions for part of the year. 

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.20  XDm9mm  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.19    2 weeks ago
I think they are talking about year round temperatures in the south of over 100 degrees every day.

I'll take the heat, as I currently do over the cold any day.   

No one will want to live there. 

Except those of us that do.  Not everyone wants to live in colder climates.   

 
 
 
r.t..b...
1.1.21  r.t..b...  replied to  XDm9mm @1.1.17    2 weeks ago
put our efforts into finding ways our species can exist in the environment that will come.

And hence the efforts in addressing the situation we globally face.

A healthy dose of skepticism is essential in the 'post-truth' age in which we find ourselves, but to deny empirical scientific evidence devolves into cynicism and that is certainly not healthy...and eventually fatal.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.1.22  XDm9mm  replied to  r.t..b... @1.1.21    2 weeks ago
And hence the efforts in addressing the situation we globally face.

Exactly how is an impossible venture at stopping nature from doing what nature has done and will continue to do addressing how we can find ways to survive as a species in what nature has in store for us?

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
1.1.23  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  r.t..b... @1.1.15    2 weeks ago

I have to agree with you there rtb. It's like bury our heads in the sand now, so that our kids suffer later, rather than make some minor changes in how we treat this planet.

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.1.24  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  r.t..b... @1.1.4    2 weeks ago

I am not a climatologist. All I can tell you is what I personally experienced down there. 

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.2  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  JohnRussell @1    2 weeks ago

When I was at McMurdo Station in the late 80's we had the hottest temp on record up to that time and that was 58 degrees above zero Farenheit in December of 1987 without the wind chill factor taken into account. That was positively shirt sleeve weather down there!

 
 
 
XDm9mm
1.2.1  XDm9mm  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @1.2    2 weeks ago
That was positively shirt sleeve weather down there!

That was akin to when I moved to MN in 1990.  I didn't understand how the "locals" could be out in 40 degree temps in bikinis washing their cars.  Well at least until I lived through a few MN winters when you look forward to a zero temperature as a warming trend.  jrSmiley_79_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
1.2.2  Ed-NavDoc  replied to  XDm9mm @1.2.1    2 weeks ago

Coldest I ever experienced down there was -98 below zero in September of 1990, and that did not include the wind chill factor! One did not go out much except from building to building and well bundled up in extreme cold weather gear! Antarctica is also the coldest, windiest, and driest place on Earth. In living and working down there, one adapted and just got used to it, although some just could not handle the isolation, especially those that "wintered" over.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
2  seeder  JohnRussell    2 weeks ago

Donald Trump is in bed with the worst climate changing, fossil fuel kingpins on earth. 

 
 
 
WallyW
2.1  WallyW  replied to  JohnRussell @2    2 weeks ago

 What about the real polluters like China and Russia?  Fossil fuels will continue to be used because they are abundant and cheap

 
 
 
r.t..b...
2.1.1  r.t..b...  replied to  WallyW @2.1    2 weeks ago
What about the real polluters like China and Russia? 

Pulling out of the Paris Agreement certainly does not help as our influence as a leader in adhering to and contributing reasonable dialogue to international accords has been rendered moot. 

 
 
 
MUVA
2.1.2  MUVA  replied to  r.t..b... @2.1.1    2 weeks ago

It didn't hurt it either China is going to pollute emerging countries are going to pollute and the rest of the world wants us to pay for it.Every few year for example the  EPA comes out with new standards for outboard motors we in the industry are on our fourth standard since the late 90's that has caused the price of engines to go thru the roof with a new motor over 200 horsepower 2 stroke costing as much as  27,000 dollars yet Yamaha still sells their polluting 2 strokes around the world while our country bans them for  being manufactured both for foreign domestic markets.Every industry in this country is made to follow rules from disposal and the use of chemicals to the manufacturing process China and Russia not so much.

 
 
 
Tacos!
3  Tacos!    2 weeks ago

So, it's finally just about warm enough for me to go.

 
 
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