These are the democratic socialists backing Bernie Sanders

  
Via:  tig  •  one month ago  •  27 comments

By:   By Elle Reeve, CNN

These are the democratic socialists backing Bernie Sanders
He said, 'I have never had health care.' And he's almost 60 years old. And I said, 'Well, Bernie Sanders wants to make it to where everybody has health care,'"

I wonder how much they have considered the practicality of Sanders' proposals.   Do they just presume it will somehow work?


S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


(CNN)Connor McClelland is a  democratic socialist . He says it's because of where he's from.

"I'm originally from West Virginia, and so every time I go home, you see the mountains are just cleared. The trees are gone. Coal dust covers the roads. But like, no one's life is improving there. It's just extraction. It's extraction all the time," he says.   "I think we have to restructure society in a different way. There has to be more regulation. There has to be a vision for the future in which the people who work are valued higher than they are now."

In poll after poll, young people are politically much further to the left of older Americans.   According to Gallup , 52% of 18- to 34-year-olds have a positive view of socialism, while fewer, 47%, have a positive view of capitalism. (For comparison, more than two-thirds of people older than 55 have a positive view of capitalism.)

That age group is at the heart of   Bernie Sanders ' support as he seeks the Democratic nomination. Nationally,   54% of Democratic voters younger than 30 back Sanders , a democratic socialist. In the Nevada caucuses,   Sanders won around two-thirds of voters younger than 30 , according to entrance polls.   This enthusiasm was apparent at the  Young Democratic Socialists of America  conference in Chicago earlier this month. McClelland road tripped with 11 people from East Tennessee State University to join 275 student activists, who had come to learn how to be better organizers.

While the Democratic Socialists of America, the larger group behind the YDSA, has been around since the early 1980s, it saw a surge in membership with Sanders' presidential campaign in 2016.   In 2014 , the DSA took in less than $300,000 in contributions and grants. Just three years later, in 2017, that number was more than $2.1 million. Membership also has grown from 24,000 members to 56,000 in three years. And according to DSA spokesman Lawrence Dreyfuss, in 2019, the group took in more than 180,000 donations averaging $18.80.

Last year, the DSA endorsed Sanders, and announced it would run an independent expenditure campaign to get the vote out for Sanders in the 2020 presidential election.

"I want to say I've been a socialist my whole life," Sam Lynn, a student at UNC Chapel Hill, said. "I didn't know it until Bernie Sanders started running in 2016."

'Y'allidarity'


McClelland and his friends spilled out of their vans and into a hostel in 15-degree weather. Their roadtrip had taken 14 hours. Some of the women refreshed their makeup in a fluorescent-lit room with six bunk beds, and then, daunted by the idea of finding another parking spot, they all took an Uber to the conference. There, they mingled with the rest of the 275 college and high school students who'd come to learn how to be better organizers. The non-vegans were reminded not to take the vegan pizza.

Sanders inspired many of these students to take up local activism. Last year, the group at Eastern Tennessee State successfully campaigned to increase the wages of the lowest paid adjunct professors on campus.  "You don't expect a bunch of young socialists to be in the middle of Tennessee, but I think we're, like, one of the biggest political clubs on campus," said Aria Inaba, who celebrated her 21st birthday at the conference.  Her friend, Carson Morgan, wore a "Y'allidarity" pin on his lapel, "to raise awareness that there are leftist movements in red states." Another pin said, "Fashion."  "It's not an official stance by the YDSA, but a personal belief," he said. "Fashion, not fascism."

The students listened to panels about the Green New Deal, union organizing in Chicago and electing Sanders, which were interrupted by periodic chants and waving flags. At a workshop on how to deal with the press, they learned how to get the word out. An instructor said of journalists, "They're capitalists ultimately, most of them. They want things that they can sell, for lack of a better word. Luckily, socialism sells."  If you want to feel the generational shift apparent in the 2020 election, listen to young socialists explain how the 2008 financial crisis affected their families -- as they remind you they were in third grade when it happened.  "Some millennial people remember [the 2008 crisis] quite well, and they have a lot of feelings about that and how that's changed their life," McClelland said. "People who are really young like me -- who're just getting in now, old enough to vote -- have seen maybe even their parents struggling under that."  Sometimes his family had insurance, and sometimes they didn't.  "Some things that people forget is, like in my case, I had a single mother and it was like she just couldn't get off work. You can't leave work, you can't stop working," he said. "I remember how hard it was and how much of a struggle it was."

Given the sharp ideological age gap, one might expect these students to have fought with their older relatives over politics. But it was striking how many students said they were socialists because of the experiences of their parents.   Austin Cable, who co-founded the YDSA chapter at East Tennessee State University with McClelland, said his dad is a Trump supporter. Cable says he got his dad to be OK with his political views by not criticizing the president, but instead explaining Sanders' policies.

Austin Cable, a co-founder of the Young Democratic Socialists of America chapter at East Tennessee State University, is pictured with his father.  "I asked my dad, 'When's the last time you've had health care?' He said, 'I have never had health care.' And he's almost 60 years old. And I said, 'Well, Bernie Sanders wants to make it to where everybody has health care,'" Cable said. "At the end, I just said, 'Dad, you know, I support Bernie Sanders 'cause I support you.'" 

Lynn, the student at UNC Chapel Hill, said he and his sister didn't have health care growing up. "I have health care now, it still affects the way that I view my health and the health of the people that I love," Lynn said. "And I feel like I still feel like even to this day, I would rather I truly believe I would rather die than become an economic burden on my family."

Beth Girma's parents immigrated from Ethiopia in the late 1990s.  "I've seen my parents and my family members really work hard to achieve the so-called American dream.... which is in a way, like, impossible," she said. They were both nurses who worked a lot of overtime. "I've never seen such hard workers. ... but they shouldn't have had to work this hard to afford my basic needs." Girma, a student at Western Washington University, seemed to have had the toughest time convincing her parents.

"Politics ends up being a difficult thing for my family to talk about," she said. "They did see a lot of regime change within their lifetime."

'They will lose in 2020 if it's not Bernie Sanders'


But as enthusiastic as these students are about Sanders, many within the Democratic Party are worried the "socialism" label would be ballot box poison.  "I would say 'panic' would be the adjective to describe the mood right now," former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel told CNN. And former Secretary of State John Kerry was overheard by NBC saying Sanders would take the Democratic Party "down whole."

That could translate into a hurdle for Sanders. The New York Times spoke to 93 Democratic superdelegates "and found overwhelming opposition to handing the Vermont senator the nomination if he arrived with the most delegates but fell short of a majority." Some floated the idea of Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown seizing the nomination at the convention. Virginia Rep. Don Beyer suggested Sens. Mark Warner, Chris Coons or House Speaker Nancy Pelosi could be a nominee the party could rally behind.  But the young democratic socialists here predict that blocking a Sanders nomination would not go well for Democrats.

"If Bernie Sanders goes into the convention with a plurality of delegates and doesn't come out the nominee, I genuinely think that will be the end of the Democratic Party," Lynn said. "They will lose in 2020 if it's not Bernie Sanders. They will lose in 2024. They will lose in 2028."  McClelland said that in 2016, people wanted hope, and "Trump, no matter how twisted and ugly it is, gave some people hope," while the Democrats did not. He sees one chance for 2020 to be different. "Bernie Sanders, I think, is the only candidate in the Democratic Party who can do that. He can give people hope."


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TᵢG
1  seeder  TᵢG    one month ago

A little to help us unravel this mystery.

 
 
 
WallyW
1.1  WallyW  replied to  TᵢG @1    one month ago
(deleted)
 
 
 
TᵢG
1.1.1  seeder  TᵢG  replied to  WallyW @1.1    one month ago
(deleted)
 
 
 
evilgenius
2  evilgenius    one month ago
"Bernie Sanders, I think, is the only candidate in the Democratic Party who can do that. He can give people hope."

I guess false hope is better than no hope at all?

 
 
 
TᵢG
2.1  seeder  TᵢG  replied to  evilgenius @2    one month ago

Our nation continues to creep further into government dependence.

 
 
 
evilgenius
2.1.1  evilgenius  replied to  TᵢG @2.1    one month ago

Even were Sanders to win he wouldn't be able to do a whole lot more than Obama or Trump. It would be minor gains easily reversible when the next person got sworn in. That is what actually depresses me a bit. The social and populist political division we are experiencing equals medium term stagnation as we wobble back and forth. History won't be kind.

 
 
 
TᵢG
2.1.2  seeder  TᵢG  replied to  evilgenius @2.1.1    one month ago

He would have a major negative psychological effect on the economy.   A PotUS can do very little to improve an economy but can indeed sour it.

 
 
 
evilgenius
2.1.3  evilgenius  replied to  TᵢG @2.1.2    one month ago

True point. Wall Street ain't supporting Bernie.

 
 
 
TᵢG
2.1.4  seeder  TᵢG  replied to  evilgenius @2.1.3    one month ago

Worse, business executives and investors pay close attention to the likely actions of the PotUS.    It is factored into their growth plans (among other things).   A great way to put a cap on a growing economy is to suggest that restrictions / taxes will be coming.

And note, I am not arguing that we should have a laissez-faire capitalist economy.   I am just noting the historical reality of government regulations and taxes on business strategies.

 
 
 
evilgenius
2.1.5  evilgenius  replied to  TᵢG @2.1.4    one month ago

Again true. We may see some stagnation depending on what Sanders can actually accomplish. I'm no economist, but I believe some of that could be contingent on how this Pandemic/Stock fall pans out and some of Bernie's ideas on infrastructure renewal. Example - AT&T might take a hit, but the state's biggest construction company could see growth. 

 
 
 
Freewill
2.1.6  Freewill  replied to  TᵢG @2.1.4    one month ago

“And note, I am not arguing that we should have a laissez-faire capitalist economy. “

Why not?  (-:

Seems to me that the same evolution of human nature required to make truly Marxist stateless democratic socialism (or libertarian socialism) work would also allow Rothbardian anarcho-capitalism to work.

 
 
 
TᵢG
2.1.7  seeder  TᵢG  replied to  Freewill @2.1.6    one month ago
Why not?

Because businesses need some degree of regulation.   Free market capitalism is not entirely self-regulating to the objectives of modern society.   For example, societies care about things such as recycling resources, pollution, equal opportunity, fair competition, consumer safety, etc.   Left alone, businesses will naturally focus on achieving market share and increasing shareholder value.   Those uber-objectives routinely supersede many of the societal objectives.

Seems to me that the same evolution of human nature required to make truly Marxist stateless democratic socialism (or libertarian socialism) work would also allow Rothbardian anarcho-capitalism to work.

I agree.   In the future, societal evolution might yield a system that, when compared with what we have, will look like a different paradigm.   That system could be socialism at its core (decentralized democratic control over the productive resources of the economy) or could have a core of capitalism but with a remarkably different shell.   Participatory dynamics might yield a system of capitalism that even Karl Marx would approve.

Why not?

Second answer now.   Because society is not yet sufficiently evolved to make it work.

 
 
 
WallyW
3  WallyW    one month ago

 "If Bernie Sanders goes into the convention with a plurality of delegates and doesn't come out the nominee, I genuinely think that will be the end of the Democratic Party," Lynn said. "They will lose in 2020 if it's not Bernie.  They will lose in 2024. They will lose in 2028."

That pretty much sums it up. Even if he is the nominee, he will lose the popular and the EC vote. There is no hope for the Dems.

 
 
 
TᵢG
3.1  seeder  TᵢG  replied to  WallyW @3    one month ago

I do not see how Sanders can win the general.   The Ds need to nominate someone else.   Bloomberg is the most likely candidate to win in the general as I see things.

 
 
 
TᵢG
3.1.2  seeder  TᵢG  replied to  JBB @3.1.1    one month ago

If Bloomberg does not prevail, Biden is likely the next best shot.   But I do not see how Biden can convince the electorate that he will not make a change for the worse (in the economy).

 
 
 
JBB
3.1.3  JBB  replied to  TᵢG @3.1.2    one month ago

I don't know why you say that. It is Obama's recovery and Biden is an Obama legacy. Also, the economy isn't that great other than the stock market and low unemployment. Basically we are experiencing an extension of what has been developing economically for eleven years. We are due for a cyclical slow down. Trump and the gop certainly have not been fiscally responsible. I trust Biden to be a steadying leader. I also expect he would be a one term President by his own choice. It is, after all, The Democratic Party. Joe Biden will probably be the Democratic candidate IMHO and he is most likely of them all to beat Trump...

Sanders and Bloomberg aren't really even Democrats.

 
 
 
Baron Creek
3.1.4  Baron Creek  replied to  TᵢG @3.1    one month ago

It will require him winning the nomination. There are 1,344 delegates at stake this Tuesday. He "might" get 10%, with the bulk coming from those perennial democratic strongholds of Texas, Tennessee, Utah, Alabama, Arkansas and Oklahoma, while possibly "winning" Arkansas and possibly Oklahoma. He needs to hurry-up... just to qualify for many delegates in the actual democratic states. 

Frankly, the damage Bloomberg poses is even greater than Sanders, imo.

 
 
 
TᵢG
3.1.5  seeder  TᵢG  replied to  JBB @3.1.3    one month ago
I don't know why you say that. It is Obama's recovery and Biden is an Obama legacy.

The only thing that matters is what the electorate believes.   This is never about facts, it is about perception.   Biden would need to get people to believe that he is better for the economy than Trump.   Do not underestimate the difficulty of that feat.    And, generally, PotUS' are not going to fix an economy; they can at best influence and hope.   Economies are very complex, cyclic things and nobody has the secret elixirs to fix them when they are sick.   For the most part it involves staying 'clean' to give the economy the chance to slowly correct itself normally.

We are due for a cyclical slow down. 

I agree.

Sanders and Bloomberg aren't really even Democrats.

That, personally, does not bother me.  

 
 
 
TᵢG
3.1.6  seeder  TᵢG  replied to  Baron Creek @3.1.4    one month ago
Frankly, the damage Bloomberg poses is even greater than Sanders, imo.

I do not see why.   What do you have in mind?

 
 
 
Baron Creek
3.1.7  Baron Creek  replied to  TᵢG @3.1.6    one month ago

We can likely guess how the Sanders' crowd would react if he does not get the nomination. Bringing in Bloomberg would offend more than just the Sanders' crowd, imo. It would also lay to rest any notion of democracy playing a part in the Democratic Party's nominating process. The Democratic party has oft proclaimed the 2016 result was flawed as the E.C. gave the Presidency to Trump instead of Clinton... who won the most votes (although not a majority).

None of the candidates will have a majority, so the fall back should be among the candidates with most votes or delegates. Bloomberg will not be in that equation. It boils down to Uncle Joe or Uncle Bernie in my opinion. Buttigieg is intriguing, but seems a much more realistic candidate in 2024, along with a few others.  

The party split will be quite evident very shortly and the eventual nominee will need to think about a highly visible and viable V.P. candidate. Hopefully, someone with some youth. Example: Sanders/Buttigieg; Biden/Buttigieg; Sanders/Gabbard; Biden/Klobuchar; Biden/Gabbard. Those are but a few examples as you might toss in Warren (risky), but don't get tripped up by the idea that the ideologies are mismatched in some instances. 

Einstein defined insanity as doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results. I'm suggesting a lot of people think voting traditional D/R over and over will get the same results, and is therefore insane?

That's what I have in mind.

 
 
 
TᵢG
3.1.8  seeder  TᵢG  replied to  Baron Creek @3.1.7    one month ago
We can likely guess how the Sanders' crowd would react if he does not get the nomination.

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Bringing in Bloomberg would offend more than just the Sanders' crowd, imo. It would also lay to rest any notion of democracy playing a part in the Democratic Party's nominating process. 

That is true of any candidate in a brokered convention.

None of the candidates will have a majority, so the fall back should be among the candidates with most votes or delegates. Bloomberg will not be in that equation.

Why not?

It boils down to Uncle Joe or Uncle Bernie in my opinion. Buttigieg is intriguing, but seems a much more realistic candidate in 2024, along with a few others.  

The likely finalists right now IMO are Sanders, Biden and Bloomberg.

The party split will be quite evident very shortly and the eventual nominee will need to think about a highly visible and viable V.P. candidate. Hopefully, someone with some youth.

I fully agree.

Einstein defined insanity as doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results. I'm suggesting a lot of people think voting traditional D/R over and over will get the same results, and is therefore insane?

The core problem with a two-party system.

 
 
 
Baron Creek
3.1.9  Baron Creek  replied to  TᵢG @3.1.8    one month ago
Why not?

The last true brokered convention was back when I was trying to see how fast my tricycle would go, so it was not something in my window of thought. I can remember an age when people accepted the leadership of party bosses and rarely questioned what is taking place and remained fairly civil (compliant). Those days are long gone, imo. 

I have analyzed the latest poll data and it does suggest a Bloomberg surge to about 17% of Tuesday's delegates, but it appears to be at the expense of Biden. My best estimate is Bloomberg would be in Warren territory, far behind Biden and even further behind Sanders. 

But then... what do I know? At least my prediction will shortly be proved or disproved. 

 
 
 
TᵢG
3.1.10  seeder  TᵢG  replied to  Baron Creek @3.1.9    one month ago

Yes much of the fog will clear next week and we will see suspended campaigns and the remaining few candidates.   

 
 
 
evilgenius
3.2  evilgenius  replied to  WallyW @3    one month ago
Even if he is the nominee, he will lose the popular and the EC vote.

That totally depends on DNC leadership. As it stands right now there is a narrow path to victory under Sanders in the polls. I don't thing it will hold, but it might. Nothing is certain.

 
 
 
CB
4  CB     one month ago
"If Bernie Sanders goes into the convention with a plurality of delegates and doesn't come out the nominee, I genuinely think that will be the end of the Democratic Party," Lynn said. "They will lose in 2020 if it's not Bernie Sanders. They will lose in 2024. They will lose in 2028."  McClelland said that in 2016, people wanted hope, and "Trump, no matter how twisted and ugly it is, gave some people hope," while the Democrats did not. He sees one chance for 2020 to be different. "Bernie Sanders, I think, is the only candidate in the Democratic Party who can do that. He can give people hope."

Excuse my sour tone, but all I really know is these SOB's had two-three years to get this 'crack' strategized and condensed down to who would be speaking on the DNC nomination platform! And here we are being warned about an upcoming damn MAJOR headache!

Bernie Sanders, who has long and deep-abiding associations with the Democratic Party, pulled a similar kind of act four years ago and surprised us all. Why is he still surprising us today?! Bernie's "people" threaten all the time now.

Well, I am possibly not going to vote for Bernie's brand of politics in any case. I know there is a lot wrong with this country, but that lies heart and center with republicanism screwing up ("see-sawing") everything every-time it gets a hold of the political levers.

All us aging people are going to live miserably the next four years and counting, if we don't get our collective "SHIT" together: Independents, Democrats, and some republicans and conservatives. Some of us are going to die in the next four years with Trump 'covering' us.

I don't want Trump to be president when I 'croak.' I don't want the lies and the hurt, that is Trump 'sheltering' me. Just look down the timeline and see what this country will be under a super-confident A-hole who has a mandate to make liberalism eat 'fhit'!

People wake up. Right here - right now!

My whole family has observed that my words have coarsened of recent. I simply can't help it. We, are in trouble, as a nation right now.

 
 
 
Freewill
5  Freewill    one month ago

384

 
 
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