High School Student Sparks Debate After Protesting School's 'Sexist' Dress Code

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  john-russell  •  one week ago  •  41 comments

High School Student Sparks Debate After Protesting School's 'Sexist' Dress Code
In protest of the dress code assembly regarding 'too much [midriff],' we are all wearing crop tops," the poster read. "Boys! Support your friends and crop your tops!!" "Our body our choice, it isn't our fault they're distracted. They can't take away our confidence and self-expression," Frick-Hisaw wrote in a text box on the post.

AAKSH0F.img?h=392&w=624&m=6&q=60&o=f&l=f&x=2047&y=639


S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


Evita Frick-Hisaw, 16, also known as @baggyjeanmom on TikTok, posted her now-viral   video   showing live clips from a dress code protest she and her peers staged last week. According to a saved   Instagram   story post on her public account, she and her peers held the demonstration on June 3 at Natomas Charter School's Performing and Fine Arts Academy in Sacramento, California.

"In protest of the dress code assembly regarding 'too much [midriff],' we are all wearing crop tops," the poster read. "Boys! Support your friends and crop your tops!!"

"Our body our choice, it isn't our fault they're distracted. They can't take away our confidence and self-expression," Frick-Hisaw wrote in a text box on the post.

Newsweek   spoke to Frick-Hisaw, who confirmed that about 30-40 students came out in support of the protest, which was held after hearing about administrators' plans to host a discussion on student clothing.

"[The school principal] was going to have an assembly on dress code so in response we wore crop tops to protest," Frick-Hisaw confirmed. "It was a day-long process, we showed up in crop tops and they started dress coding people."

The video begins with Frick-Hisaw and her peers showing off their outfits, which all included crop tops revealing their stomachs. The video then cuts to a clip in which she now dons an oversized brown shirt, claiming to have been "dress coded before school even started." In the next clip, she changes into a red spaghetti strap top.

In text overlay on the video, Frick-Hisaw claims that she and dozens of other students against the school's current dress code engage in a peaceful "walkout," in which they sit on the ground in a socially distant circle on campus.

Several young women in attendance also arrive with body art and words written across their stomachs, including phrases like "Am I distracting?", "Skinny Pass?" and "Distraction." It appears to be a comment on administrative reasoning for not allowing crop tops in class.

The video ends with the protesters "taken into the theater for a 'talk,'" noting that "now we are having a real talk to change the dress code." However, Frick-Hisaw notes that "unfortunately, people are getting kicked out" for their participation in the protest.

Frick-Hisaw confirmed with   Newsweek   that the discussion in the school theater was a starting point "so we could see what we could do about the situation."

She also included photos of protesters in and around the school throughout the day, as well as signs found on campus in the video. One poster demanded, "Teach boys to focus, not girls to cover up." "If [children's] midriffs distract you, you should not be working with children," another read.

Frick-Hisaw also noted in her statement to   Newsweek   that the protest resulted in a school meeting the next day with the intent of "hopefully [changing] the dress code next year."

The video has since been viewed over 3.1 million times and liked by nearly one million viewers. Many in the comments vocalized their support for the student demonstration.

"I am LIVING for this...I wish I had the idea to do this back when I was in school," one commenter wrote. "They can hold an assembly to tell girls how to dress but they can't have an assembly to educate boys on how they should respect other [people's] bodies," another added.

One student in attendance praised those brave enough to take a part in the protest. "Let's go, everyone. So proud of everyone especially the younger grades. Most of the [seniors] were told they couldn't walk [at] graduation if they participated," they claimed. "Multiple staff [members] have tried [to] take away posters and flyers that we are not placing on campus, just handing them [out] for people to hold."

Others commented on how dress codes work at their school, arguing that they are "archaic" and "sexist."

"Whenever teachers used to try to dress code me, I would ask them why they were even staring at my body to begin with. And they would get nervous," one person recalled. "We actually had a [transgender] girl get dress coded at our school because boys shouldn't wear dresses," another claimed.

Not everyone agreed with Frick-Hisaw and her peers. Some felt their response to the situation was "childish," and argued in favor of mandated dress codes.

"These little kids are gonna have a really hard time getting a job in the future if they can't understand the basics of dress code," one critic wrote.

Frick-Hisaw made a video responding to that comment and provided more context to the initial video.

"So the reason why we did all this is because we were gonna have an assembly on dress code, and we felt the dress code was sexist towards women and also perpetuating rape culture," she said. "That made us very uncomfortable."

"We all just want some freedom of expression and freedom to express our confidence, whether that's in a baggy t-shirt or in a tiny little tank top," she added. "We as students feel like what we wear is not distracting towards others or affecting anyone's learning environment."

She also addressed the comment's note about dress codes in the workforce. "We know we're gonna have a dress code when we get older and possibly have uniforms with whatever job that comes, but right now we're in school and we're in a learning environment," she said.

"We should not have to be kicked out of class just because we're wearing a crop top," Frick-Hisaw concluded.

The comments on her follow-up video remained highly supportive. "Don't listen to people like that! They used to say that colored hair & tattoos were unprofessional. That's clearly not the case anymore!" one wrote. "Got dress coded all the time in school. Just letting you know you CAN still get a job & be successful! Keep using your voice it's inspiring," another commented.

Frick-Hisaw told   Newsweek   that she was blown away by the support she received, and had no idea the video would reach as many people as it did.

"I didn't expect it to have three million views [per se] but I wasn't completely shocked, [overall] I'm very very grateful for it," she said. "I really appreciate the support but I don't mind the hate comments because there's always gunna be those kinds of people."

She also told   Newsweek   that in her ideal world, there is little to no dress code enforcement. "Honestly if it were me [in charge] I wouldn't be harsh on dress code, I'm a big advocate for self-expression and confidence so if you like it it's not a problem for me."

Newsweek   reached out to the administration at Natomas Charter School's Performing and Fine Arts Academy for comment on the situation but did not hear back in time for publication.

This is the latest in a host of instances across the world in which dress codes and fashion norms have been challenged in schools. In May, two teachers in Spain   wore skirts to class   every day in solidarity with a student bullied for his own fashion choices. Another school in London faced intense backlash after they   threatened student protesters with expulsion   over disagreements on their "discriminatory" dress code, which allegedly targeted Black and Muslim students.


Tags

jrDiscussion - desc
[]
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1  seeder  JohnRussell    one week ago

I am almost completely on the side of the school(s).  Kids should not come to school dressed like this

800

I dont care if they feel like it is their right. The taxpayers are paying for them to learn and get an education, not spend all day "expressing themselves". 

I went to a Catholic high school and the boys had to wear light colored dress shirts with a tie and dark colored trousers EVERY DAY.  This was decades ago but I'm pretty sure it is still the dress code in Catholic high schools. The girls wear uniform blouses and skirts. It teaches you to respect school and your surroundings.  I wish all school kids had to wear some sort of uniform but I know that ship sailed decades ago.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.1  Vic Eldred  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one week ago

I couldn't agree more!


I went to a Catholic high school and the boys had to wear light colored dress shirts with a tie and dark colored trousers EVERY DAY.  This was decades ago but I'm pretty sure it is still the dress code in Catholic high schools. The girls wear uniform blouses and skirts. It teaches you to respect school and your surroundings.

I remember those days. It also teaches them HOW TO DRESS!

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.1    one week ago

Young males being distracted by girls wearing crop tops or short skirts is controversial the same way that the operation of gravity is controversial. 

But even beyond recognizing that fact school is not the place for constant self expression. I don't think kids should be able to wear t shirts with memes on them to school either. 

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.1.2  Vic Eldred  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.1    one week ago

I think we are in total agreement.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
1.2  Ozzwald  replied to  JohnRussell @1    6 days ago
I dont care if they feel like it is their right. The taxpayers are paying for them to learn and get an education, not spend all day "expressing themselves". 

These are kids, they will express themselves all they want.  If the school wants to regulate their clothing, the school needs to adopt a school uniform like your Catholic school did.

Young males being distracted by girls wearing crop tops or short skirts is controversial the same way that the operation of gravity is controversial.

If you want to regulate clothing to prevent young males from being distracted with improper thoughts, perhaps you feel we should follow this example.

depositphotos_11747745-stock-photo-arabic-muslim-school-girl.jpg

It is what you are suggesting, although probably to a greater degree than you meant.  But it is a step in the wrong direction. 

Better to teach young boys to not be distracted, or else they will have a hard time driving down the street in summer time.  Remember, we've made a small flash of skin to be scandalous, other countries do not have that problem.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.2.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Ozzwald @1.2    3 days ago

I really dont care what anyone says, liberal or conservative. These outfits are not appropriate for school. Although the "distraction" possibility exists with this sort of dress, I also object to the school catering to students desire to "express themselves" all day long. They are there to be educated, not go on an ego trip. 

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Masters Guide
1.3  Thrawn 31  replied to  JohnRussell @1    3 days ago

Don’t see anything wrong with the way they are dressed. Never go to a college campus if that bothers you, and maybe generally avoid society at large generally.

Their stomachs are showing, I fail to see the problem.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.3.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Thrawn 31 @1.3    3 days ago

Never go to a beach if that sort of dress distresses you

 
 
 
arkpdx
Senior Participates
1.3.2  arkpdx  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.3.1    3 days ago

Time and place. The beach is the place and time for that type of clothing. School is not. Wait until they get out in the real world and they try to go into the office dressed like that. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.3.3  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.3.1    3 days ago
Never go to a beach if that sort of dress distresses you

So children should approach school as if it were the beach then? 

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.3.4  Trout Giggles  replied to  arkpdx @1.3.2    2 days ago
She also addressed the comment's note about dress codes in the workforce. "We know we're gonna have a dress code when we get older and possibly have uniforms with whatever job that comes, 

from the seed

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.3.5  Trout Giggles  replied to  JohnRussell @1.3.3    2 days ago

that's not what I said, but if a bare belly is enough to distress you I suggest you stay away from the beach

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.3.6  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.3.5    2 days ago

I stay away from the beach because I sunburn extremely easily. 

I'm not sure why you associate going to school with going to the beach. 

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.3.7  Trout Giggles  replied to  JohnRussell @1.3.6    2 days ago

I don't. But you guys are acting like these young women should be dressed in burkas when they go to school. It's not the girls' fault if the boys are distracted. It's time we teach our sons to not be little snowflakes when it comes to human flesh

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.3.8  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.3.7    2 days ago
I don't. But you guys are acting like these young women should be dressed in burkas when they go to school. It's not the girls' fault if the boys are distracted. It's time we teach our sons to not be little snowflakes when it comes to human flesh

I never said or implied they should be dressed in burkas . Personally I wish all kids had to wear uniforms to school, but that will never happen at public schools. Burkas? no, but not like this

800

When you dress like that you are making the entire day about how you look and what people think of you and your self expression. That is not why they are in school. 

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.3.9  Trout Giggles  replied to  JohnRussell @1.3.8    2 days ago

Believe it or not, I'm all for school uniforms, too. As for these girls making the entire day about themselves? Don't they all do that, even the boys?

 
 
 
arkpdx
Senior Participates
1.4  arkpdx  replied to  JohnRussell @1    3 days ago

OMG? John and I agree on something. They must be breaking out the parkas in hell. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2  seeder  JohnRussell    one week ago

It’s a   hot  belly  button issue   — and the kids are going crop-top crazy. 

With their tummies on full display, a band of rebel students in California staged a midriff mutiny, in objection to their high school’s “sexist” dress-code policy, on June 3. 

And since-viral footage of their waistline-exposing walkout has garnered more than 3 million views on   TikTok .

“The dress code is sexist towards women and perpetuates rape culture. It makes us very uncomfortable,” said the creator of the clothing coup, Evita Frick-Hisaw, 16, on the social-media platform. 

“We as students feel like what we wear is not distracting towards others or affecting anyone’s learning environment,” the abdomen-baring advocate added. 

According to the teen’s trending posts, school administrators scheduled an assembly last Thursday to forbid coeds from wearing   shirts that revealed their stomachs

But with Instagram Stories as her soapbox, Frick-Hisaw called for her male and female peers to don crop tops to school that day and walk out as the dress-code caucus in an act of defiance.  

‘Our bodies, our choice. [It] isn’t our fault they’re distracted.’

“In protest of the dress code assembly regarding ‘too much mid-drift,’ we are all wearing crop tops,” her digital flyer read. 

“Our bodies, our choice. [It] isn’t our fault they’re distracted,” Frick-Hisaw added. “They can’t take away our confidence and self-expression.”

Midway through the principal’s dress-code address, students stormed out of the assembly room and took to the school’s courtyard wearing crop tops, bralettes and baby tees, per video of the demonstration.

California student Evita Frick-Hisaw went viral on TikTok after organizing a crop-top rally in protest of her high school’s “sexist” dress code. @baggyjeanmom via TikTok

Protesters painted messages across their stomachs that read: “Distraction,” “It’s not my fault” and “Am I distracting?” — challenging the notion that their bare bellies disrupt classroom workflow. 

They also picketed with computer paper-sized signs saying, “Teach boys to focus, not girls to cover up.” 

And as a flick of the nose to faculty and staffers who oppose their revealing clothes, students typed up a missive reading: “If childrens’ midriffs distract you, you should not be working with children.”

Protest signs challenged school administrators. @baggyjeanmom via TikTok

Audiences on TikTok applauded Frick-Hisaw for her advocacy. 

“I am LIVING for this . . . I wish I had the idea to do this back when I was in school,” one cyber supporter wrote in her comments. 

“I mean in University we don’t have a dress code and everything fine and no one is distracted so idk where they get that from,” another said. 

Frick-Hisaw ended her viral video saying her ensemble insurrection inspired “real talk” about the dress code between students and administrators. 

However, she admitted that some kids did get kicked out of school following the daring demonstration. 

And in a separate clip, the teen acknowledged that she and her freedom-fighting friends won’t be able to flaunt their midriffs once they graduate and enter into the professional word. 

“I understand that . . . But now, we are in school. We are in a learning environment, and we should not be kicked out of class just because we’re wearing a crop top,” Frick-Hisaw said. 

 
 
 
Transyferous Rex
Freshman Participates
3  Transyferous Rex    one week ago
Our body our choice, it isn't our fault they're distracted.

Yeah, well there is a time and place for "expressing yourself" or showing off your body.

It's a distraction. Not your fault? It's as much your fault as it would be if I were to bring in rolls of bubble wrap, and constantly pop it during class. 

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
3.1  Ozzwald  replied to  Transyferous Rex @3    6 days ago
It's a distraction.

The world is full of distractions.  Time to get used to them while young.  There is no obscenity here, just some bare midriffs.

It's as much your fault as it would be if I were to bring in rolls of bubble wrap, and constantly pop it during class.

Not a good example.  If you are paying attention to the teacher, you wouldn't even be looking at the girl's midriff.  However you'd have to put your fingers in your ears to block the popping, you wouldn't be able to hear the teacher either.

 
 
 
Transyferous Rex
Freshman Participates
3.1.1  Transyferous Rex  replied to  Ozzwald @3.1    3 days ago
Not a good example.  If you are paying attention to the teacher, you wouldn't even be looking at the girl's midriff. 

That's the rub isn't it?  Let's review the definition of distraction here.

Definition of distraction

1: something that distracts : an object that directs one's attention away from something else
However you'd have to put your fingers in your ears to block the popping, you wouldn't be able to hear the teacher either.
Bubble wrap that pops loud enough to drown out a teacher talking full volume is every child's dream. I've yet to see it. However, I'm not necessarily talking about bubble wrap popping while the teacher is instructing. Maybe some idiot is randomly popping it during a written exam. I can hear it, it's not loud, but it's there, and drawing my attention away from the exam. You get the point though. It's not about what the potential distraction is, it's about the person that brings the potential distraction into the classroom. They have control over that. 
 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Masters Guide
3.2  Thrawn 31  replied to  Transyferous Rex @3    3 days ago

Then boys need to wear long sleeve shirts, and long pants. Fair is fair.

And if what they are wearing is “distracting” then it sounds like you have other issues.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
4  Trout Giggles    3 days ago

I didn't want to say anything at first but I'm gonna put my 2 cents in. My daughter never would have worn something like that, first, she is very modest, and second her dad would have had a snit fit.

Why do the girls have to cover up? Can't we teach our sons to respect girls and not treat them like sex objects? If the girls are a distraction, that's the boys' problem.

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Expert
5  Hal A. Lujah    3 days ago

You go to school to learn, not for a fashion show.

 
 
 
Veronica
Junior Guide
6  Veronica    2 days ago

You know I love how we are all worried about girl's stomachs but nothing is EVER said about guys in schools wearing their pants down around their butts so their underwear is exposed & sometimes their whole ass.  WHY is that NEVER in the conversation?

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Veronica @6    2 days ago

Why should anyone, girls or boys , show their stomachs when they dress for school? 

School is a semi formal place. You have to show up at a certain time, and usually sit in a chair or at a desk, and be quiet when others are speaking, and answer questions when the teacher asks you. It is a controlled environment so to speak. Why is it so hard for people to say kids should dress appropriately ?   I honestly dont get it. 

 
 
 
Veronica
Junior Guide
6.1.1  Veronica  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1    2 days ago

Why should anyone boys or girls walk around school with their underwear on display?    Why is that NOT part of your worry?  Why do you only show pictures of girls with what you consider inappropriate school attire?  Why can't boys be taught that school is for them to learn not leer at girls.  You are perpetuating the thought process that boys cannot control themselves & are distracted by girls.  Believe it or not boys are distracted by girls REGARDLESS of what they wear.  

I just don't get it.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1.2  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Veronica @6.1.1    2 days ago

What makes you think I am in favor of the boys showing their underwear in school ? 

The article was about a group of girls. If I see an article about a group of boys I will seed it. 

 
 
 
Veronica
Junior Guide
6.1.3  Veronica  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1.2    2 days ago

Simply because all you do is point out the girls - every time you talk - you point at the girls - YOU never say anything about the boys.  You make it all about the girls & how it is their responsibility to NOT distract the boys - which completely impossible.

 
 
 
Veronica
Junior Guide
6.1.4  Veronica  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1.2    2 days ago
group of boys I will seed it. 

That will NEVER happen because it only girls that anyone cares about putting in their place & you know it.  It is never brought up.  Of course the seed is about girls - they are the only ones that have to "dress appropriately" .  

In your comments you say they should dress for school - well talk about the boys then.  Don't wait for an article that we all know will never appear before you address it.  Or could it be that you don't care how boys dress as long as the girls don't show any skin?

BTW - both of my kids went to Catholic schools - daughter - all girls - son - all boys.  So uniforms for them.  When I was in school many moons ago - the girls wore shorts and halter tops to school & guess what?  Our graduation rate was better than it is today.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1.5  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Veronica @6.1.3    2 days ago

Are you serious? 

The article and the photos that came with it were of girls. The girls at that high school made a video saying that they want to come to school dressed like this

800

It's not appropriate. If the picture was of a boy with his stomach bare and his pants falling down and his underwear showing I would say exactly the same thing. 

 
 
 
Veronica
Junior Guide
6.1.6  Veronica  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1.5    2 days ago

YES I am serious because this is strictly a double standard hit piece.  AND I seriously doubt if it were about boys you would have seeded it at all.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1.7  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Veronica @6.1.6    2 days ago

I give up. Believe whatever you want. 

 
 
 
Veronica
Junior Guide
6.1.8  Veronica  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1.7    2 days ago

I will.  I have seen your seeds.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1.9  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Veronica @6.1.8    2 days ago

Oh please. 

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Participates
6.1.10  evilgenius  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1.5    2 days ago
It's not appropriate.

Why is not appropriate? What makes one version of dress more, or less appropriate? 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1.11  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  evilgenius @6.1.10    2 days ago

Why do they have to sit at desks, why cant they wander around the room at will?  Why cant they talk while the teacher is talking? Why can't they eat potato chips in class? 

Structure. 

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Participates
6.1.12  evilgenius  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1.11    2 days ago
Why do they have to sit at desks, why cant they wander around the room at will?  Why cant they talk while the teacher is talking? Why can't they eat potato chips in class? 

Wandering around the room, talking over the teacher and eating loudly in class are ACTIONS that can interfere with instruction. How one is dressed is passive and has no legitimate reason to impact any teachers' in class instruction.  

Structure. 

How very authoritarian. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
8  seeder  JohnRussell    2 days ago

April 30, 2010

A report released by the National Catholic Education Association has found that Catholic high schools in the United States have a 99.1% graduation rate, compared to a 73.1% graduation rate at public schools. The report also found that 84.7% of Catholic high school graduates attend four-year colleges, compared to 44.1% of public high school graduates.

Catholic high schools’ graduation rate much higher than that of public schools | News Headlines | Catholic Culture

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Expert
9  Hal A. Lujah    2 days ago

I had to wear a tie to high school every day, and it was an all male school, and worse yet - I was an atheist in a Jesuit school.  Even if public schools adopted a universal dress code it couldn’t hold a candle to that, so my own opinion of this is that these kids should stfu and use school to learn something useful instead of spending their energy on complaining about their tummy hardships.  It’s no wonder why we’ll never catch up to China.

 
 
 
Veronica
Junior Guide
9.1  Veronica  replied to  Hal A. Lujah @9    2 days ago
I had to wear a tie to high school every day, and it was an all male school, and worse yet - I was an atheist in a Jesuit school.

Sounds like my son, although he was a pagan.  

 
 
Loading...
Loading...

Who is online

bugsy
Thrawn 31
Ozzwald
Gordy327


52 visitors