Star Trek: Picard - S2 E10 - "Farewell"

  
Via:  Dig  •  2 months ago  •  29 comments

By:   Maggie Lovitt

Star Trek: Picard - S2 E10 - "Farewell"
 

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From Collider

May 5, 2022

‘Star Trek: Picard’ Season 2 Finale Review: Even Gods Have Favorites

The season finale manages to send fan favorites off into new lives with happily ever afters amid tearful farewells.


S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



The second season of Star Trek: Picard has come to an end with its aptly named finale, “Farewell.” While the penultimate episode offered closure on most of this season’s plots last week, the finale ties everything up in a neat little bow and finally sheds light on why Q (John de Lancie) set all of this into motion in the first place. The episode tugs at the heartstrings at every corner—ushering fan-favorite characters into new lives, killing off others, and bringing an air of finality to Q’s “final act.” Despite all of this, “Farewell” feels like a happily ever after, so long as they don’t pull an Into the Woods (undoing the happy endings established before the final act) when they return for the third and final season.

The episode opens with the crew trying to unravel the prophecy that Agnes (Alison Pill) provided them with last week: one Renée must live, one Renée must die. Picard (Patrick Stewart) realizes what the prophecy means at roughly the same moment that Tallinn (Orla Brady) realizes that in order to save the future, she is going to have to be the one to die. As Tallinn sets off to save Renée (Penelope Mitchell), Picard decides at the last minute to go with her, much to her chagrin. Picard wants to be the hero, he wants to save her from her impending death, but Tallinn is having none of that. She points out that saving Renée is her job, and it’s her decision, and her decision alone, if she chooses to die to fulfill that duty.

Seven (Jeri Ryan), Raffi (Michelle Hurd), and Rios (Santiago Cabrera) head to Dr. Soong’s lab, following a hunch that he has a larger plan to sabotage the Europa Mission. When they arrive he is nowhere to be found, but he has rigged the lab to make them think he’s inside. Instead, Picard spots him at the Europa launch, charming (strong-arming) his way through quarantine protocols.

In a race against time, Tallinn suits up in a flight suit and heads off to find Renée before it’s too late. Renée is startled by a stranger barging into her quarters, but then she realizes she’s seen Tallinn before. Not just at the gala a few nights ago, but throughout her life. Tallinn reveals what her purpose was, how she had been watching and guiding Renée throughout her life, and she warns her about what will happen if she doesn’t go up with the Europa Mission. Before the launch happens, Soong seemingly finds Renée alone, wandering the hallway and alarmed about a strange woman who was talking to her. Thinking that he has finally caught her, Dr. Soong uses a neurotoxin attached to his hand to poison “Renée.”

Back at Dr. Soong’s lab, the crew discovers that he has programmed a small fleet of drones to shoot down the space shuttle. Things seem dire once the drones take off, but with a little fast-thinking from Rios and Raffi, Rios is able to commandeer one of the drones and cause the rest to crash into each other, essentially saving the day.

Tallinn dies in Picard’s arms, but her death is not in vain. As she takes her final breaths, Picard urges her to look up—the sentiment that has been repeated throughout the series—and she watches as Renée and the flight launch off into orbit. With the future safely secured, Tallinn dies having accomplished her life’s mission. Her death becomes even more poignant when the crew returns to the chateau where Q is waiting for Picard in the solarium. Picard wants answers for why Q put him through all of this turmoil and, for once, Q is ready to pull up a chair and explain himself.

Q is dying, which is something that we learned two episodes ago, but now he clarifies that he’s not just dying, he’s dying alone. He doesn’t want Picard to face the same fate as him, which is why he’s meddled with time and space to teach him a lesson. Ironically, this is something that fans had qualms about when this series premiered. Picard had stepped out of public life, pulled out of his commitments with Starfleet, and was living a quiet life on his vineyard. This didn’t seem like the Picard we knew and loved from The Next Generation, and clearly, Q felt the same way. Picard pushes back, wanting to know why he matters so much to Q, and the answer is quite simple. Even gods have favorites and Picard happens to be Q’s favorite.

As Picard hashes things out with Q, Seven and Raffi finally have a moment alone to consider where their own relationship stands. But first, they talk about Rios, who is happier than either of them has ever seen him while he plays house with Teresa (Sol Rodriguez) and Ricardo (Steve Gutierrez). Seven and Raffi finally share a much-deserved kiss and make their amends. Their relationship still hasn’t been the most developed in the series, but at least they’re making headway on getting on the same page with each other.

Dr. Soong returns home and discovers that Kore (Isa Briones) is slowly deleting every file on his computer, ensuring that he can’t play mad scientist with any more of her siblings. Soong may have failed to stop the Europa Mission and his daughter may have thwarted his project, but he still has one more trick up his sleeve—Project Khan. Time has a way of connecting everything together, soon, rather than later. Speak of time. After deleting all of Soong’s files, Kore is contacted by someone who she assumes is Q, playing another trick on her. Only it’s not. It’s the Traveler, formerly known as Wesley Crusher (Wil Wheaton) who wants to recruit her into becoming a Traveler, to help him protect the natural flow of time. With all those mentions of Watchers and time travel, we should have known Wesley would show up. If this isn’t a major plot point in the final season, Star Trek: Picard may have just set up a backdoor pilot for a Doctor Who-ish spin-off. There’s definitely an audience for it.

At Picard’s prompting, the crew leaves the chateau to meet up with Q on its grounds. Raffi is understandably not thrilled about coming face-to-face with the man responsible for Elnor’s (Evan Evagora) death and Q points out that he didn’t technically kill him. While Picard, Seven, and Raffi deal with Q, Rios, Teresa, and Ricardo huddle together in the background, and you know what’s coming. Q presents them with the opportunity to go home and Rios decides he’s not going with them. He’s found home with Teresa and Ricardo. Raffi, who has been his closest friend for years, is the most torn up about him staying behind, but she also understands that he’s always been looking for home. Picard tells him to “Make a good future.” and that’s that.

Before the trio is transported back to the future, Picard and Q share a heartfelt farewell that feels like a genuine goodbye. Not just to the character Q, but to this era that has been underscored by Q’s meddling. Q didn’t just torment Picard—he was a frequent nuisance on Star Trek: Voyager and an anchor point for this particular era of Star Trek. Saying goodbye to Q feels like saying goodbye to an old friend and Picard beautifully plays out those emotions. With one last “Mon Capitaine,” Q sends Picard, Seven, and Raffi back into the future they belong in.

Once more, they’re transported back into the moment they were yanked out of—a ship set to self-destruct and a Borg queen taking control. Only, the voyage to the past has given Picard new information. Everything they set into motion in 2024, already came to pass in the present they were living. The Borg queen is Agnes and everything comes full circle at that moment as Picard fits it all together.

The Borg are trying to save their quadrant of space from a “Galactic Event” that is primed to destroy everyone living and traveling through the region. In order to deflect and contain the power of its explosion, they required the use of the entire Starfleet fleet’s shields, and Agnes knew that she could count on Picard to help her. Once the crisis is averted, they realize that a new trans-warp conduit has been born, and the Borg!Agnes explains that they desire to become the Guardians of the Gate. In order to fulfill this new role, they request a provisional membership in the Federation. Only Agnes could have brought the Borg to a point in time when they could feasibly become members of the Federation. It’s actually quite remarkable that Star Trek: Picard was able to pull off this evolution so flawlessly. At every turn, they built up this plot and pulled it off with perfect execution.

In the midst of all of this chaos, Raffi learns that Elnor is alive—Q’s last little surprise for them. Picard also places Seven in charge, making her Captain, at long last. A well-deserved promotion for someone overlooked by Starfleet.

After the dust settles, the crew makes their way to 10 Forward for a round of much-needed drinks. Picard and Guinan (Whoopi Goldberg) catch up about everything that has now come to pass for Picard, and she shares a bit about Rios’ life in the 21st century. He and Teresa started a medical supply initiative to help people in need. Renée became part of their lives, with Guinan referring to her as Ricardo’s “Auntie Renée.” Teresa lived to a ripe old age and Rios died like he lived—fighting and smoking cigars.

If you have been reading my reviews each week, then you will know that Rios is my favorite character in Picard. Like, Q, I have a favorite too. It was clear when Teresa was introduced that something would happen with this duo—either she would go to the future or he would stay in the past, and the decisions made in this episode work so well with the roguish character we’ve come to know and love. Rios becoming the Captain of a Starfleet vessel at the onset of the season felt like a disingenuous journey for the character, yet it came full circle with his decision to stay with Teresa and Ricardo. It felt like a bad fit for him because it was. He had a life in the future, but he wasn’t fully alive until he arrived in 2024.

As excited as I am about more original cast members from The Next Generation arriving in Season 3, I had my reservations about how they would fit into the cast of characters that have been the lifeblood of Picard. Allowing Rios to gracefully bow out of the future by providing him with a life well lived and loved is more fitting than relegating his character into the background without giving him a happily ever after. That’s a fate worse than dying in a bar fight over medical supplies in Morocco. Besides, should they decide they want Santiago Cabrera to make an appearance, there are five holograms aboard La Sirena that happen to look like him.

Despite all the heartbreak in this episode, the second season of Star Trek: Picard featured brilliant storytelling from start to finish. It built on key aspects from the first season, fleshing out this new world while connecting to the much larger Star Trek canon. Characters were smartly utilized to propel the central part along while developing their own storylines and giving them as much closure as the overarching plot received.

Rating: A+


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Dig
PhD Guide
1  seeder  Dig    2 months ago

I almost forgot about the Picard season finale because of the Strange New Worlds series premiere, but I finally remembered.

I didn't think this was a bad episode at all. It was kind of fun to see Wil Wheaton as Traveler Wesley, and his explanation of what the Supervisors are. In fact, at the end of the show I was half-expecting him to show up again to whisk Laris away, make her a Supervisor, and then send her back in time to be the Watcher for Renée, thus explaining why Talinn was a Romulan who looked just like Laris. They didn't do that, though, so I still don't understand that.

Soong's "Project Khan" folder was interesting. It was even dated 1996, the supposed end of the Eugenics Wars in TOS canon, when Kahn and company were exiled into space in suspended animation on the Botany Bay. I don't know how they'll fix the date problem now (or if they'll even bother), but I've always wondered about the similarity in the names Noonian Soong (Data's creator) and Khan Noonien Singh (the superhuman). If this particular Soong had something to do with Khan prior to 1996 (perhaps even the genetic work that made him), then that makes the similarity even more interesting. I wonder where they're going with that?

At any rate, I enjoyed this season finale quite a bit, even though there were two cringe-worthy moments in it (IMHO, anyway):

  1. The kiss between Seven and Raffi. I'm not buying that relationship at all, the whole thing just felt forced and gratuitous.
  2. Borg Queen Agnes. The makeup department really screwed the pooch on that one. I thought she looked horrible. They really could have done a better job than that.

There's only one more season left for Picard. Got to admit I'm already looking forward to it. I think I'm going to miss Rios a bit, though. He was kind of fun.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
1.1  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Dig @1    2 months ago

I really liked the Episode. I am actually sad to see Q die. It was really touching that he and Picard hugged. 

About Will being a Traveler... there was a whole different series called "The Traveler", which ironically starred Eric McCormick who was a "Will" in "Will and Grace", so I thought they could have come up with a different name for them. Also, what is the difference between Travelers and the Danials from Enterprise, who was involved in the temporal wars?

Now about the Trek paradox issues. If Agnes was always the Borg, then 7 would have never existed since she was assimilated as a child, and the new Borg would have never done that.

I have to agree with you Seven and Raffi. 

I'm going to miss Rios, too, but I think he could exist anywhere, and I think he seemed like a past kind of guy.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
1.1.1  seeder  Dig  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1    2 months ago
About Will being a Traveler... there was a whole different series called "The Traveler", which ironically starred Eric McCormick who was a "Will" in "Will and Grace", so I thought they could have come up with a different name for them.

The Star Trek Travelers are from the very first season of TNG, long before Eric McCormack's show. Remember this guy?

original

He showed up a few times over the years, and Wesley left the show to go with him in the episode "Journey's End." That's how Wesley became a Traveler.

Also, what is the difference between Travelers and the Danials from Enterprise, who was involved in the temporal wars?

I always assumed Daniels was working for some future organization such as the Federation Department of Temporal Investigations like Captain Braxton (who showed up in a couple of Voyager episodes), or maybe even Section 31, but they never really said, did they?

Now about the Trek paradox issues. If Agnes was always the Borg, then 7 would have never existed since she was assimilated as a child, and the new Borg would have never done that.

I've been trying to figure that out, too. I'm thinking the villainous Borg we know were a fixture of the original timeline that got repaired, so surely they didn't just go poof and disappear. I'm guessing they intend for Agnes's little faction to have been a separate thing that was peaceful and managed to stay undetected all those years. Can't be sure, though. I hope we find out later.

Sometimes all that timeline stuff makes my head hurt.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
1.1.2  sandy-2021492  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1    2 months ago
I am actually sad to see Q die. It was really touching that he and Picard hugged. 

I just can't see that Q has redeemed himself.  He was funny, and I laughed as much as anybody at Q episodes, but he was also cruel and twisted at times.  He remains a villain for me, albeit an entertaining one.

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
1.1.3  TᵢG  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1    2 months ago
Now about the Trek paradox issues. If Agnes was always the Borg, then 7 would have never existed since she was assimilated as a child, and the new Borg would have never done that.

Strange thing time.   Agnes undoubtedly changed the future since she as the Borg queen spent 400 years working her ways.   In the alternate timeline created by Q, 7 was not assimilated (physically) yet retained the memories from a timeline that did not exist (the one where she was assimilated).   If that is somehow logical, then her Borg features came not from assimilation as a child but as a result of Agnes/Queen saving her life in the past.   Her then Borg-ed self was Q-d back to the future with Borg features intact.

jrSmiley_88_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
1.1.4  sandy-2021492  replied to  TᵢG @1.1.3    2 months ago

Also, if the Borg had Agnes as their kinder, gentler Queen for 400 years, why would anybody be afraid of them?

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
1.1.5  TᵢG  replied to  sandy-2021492 @1.1.4    2 months ago

Maybe in this new alternate reality the Borg is simply benevolent.    And all of the aggressive Borg activities occurred in an alternate timeline.   This would basically mean that somehow our TNG friends have memories of a reality that never came to pass.

Or ... if one is keen to follow the lead of quantum physics (naturally means multiple alternate timelines where each individual is entangled (and thus multiply instantiated) with the reality of each of these timelines) ... the Picard season 2 is simply focused on one of a near infinite timeline and while the Borg is nasty in other timelines, they are not in this one.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
1.1.6  sandy-2021492  replied to  TᵢG @1.1.5    2 months ago

How many glasses of wine do I need to get this to make sense?

Time travel and a multiverse mess with my head.

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
1.1.7  TᵢG  replied to  sandy-2021492 @1.1.6    2 months ago

I do not think there is a way to have this make intuitive sense given none of it is intuitive.   I think it is fair to say that nobody is comfortable with quantum dynamics and the notion of superposition and entanglement producing multiple realities.

I remember an MIT class on quantum physics where the professor started out by saying that students should not expect to ever get comfortable with the experimentally proven reality of quantum dynamics.   One must learn to rely upon the mathematics (abstract reality) rather than intuition (evolved perception of reality).

But it is fun!

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
1.1.8  seeder  Dig  replied to  TᵢG @1.1.5    2 months ago
Maybe in this new alternate reality the Borg is simply benevolent.    And all of the aggressive Borg activities occurred in an alternate timeline.   This would basically mean that somehow our TNG friends have memories of a reality that never came to pass.

I don't think the producers will go that way. I think the original timeline is intact, with the addition 400 years ago of Agnes and the Queen from the other timeline, which was the alternate one that no longer exists.

Supposedly they're not evil, and La Sirena had such advanced technology compared to the 21st century (including a cloak), so they could've kept their presence a secret, no problem at all. They also could've left the Alpha Quadrant entirely for most of that time.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
1.1.9  sandy-2021492  replied to  TᵢG @1.1.7    2 months ago
I remember an MIT class on quantum physics where the professor started out by saying that students should not expect to ever get comfortable with the experimentally proven reality of quantum dynamics.

I guess I'm in good company, then.

 
 
 
evilgenius
PhD Guide
1.1.10  evilgenius  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1    2 months ago
Now about the Trek paradox issues. If Agnes was always the Borg, then 7 would have never existed since she was assimilated as a child, and the new Borg would have never done that.

There are different Borg "hives" in cannon. What I'd really find interesting is a good queen - evil queen show down in movie format.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
1.2  Sparty On  replied to  Dig @1    2 months ago
  1. The kiss between Seven and Raffi. I'm not buying that relationship at all, the whole thing just felt forced and gratuitous.

Go  back and watch some of the last few episodes.    I felt like they were hinting at it for awhile.   Wasn’t  a surprise to me.

Borg Queen Agnes. The makeup department really screwed the pooch on that one. I thought she looked horrible. They really could have done a better job than that.

Well .... she is a Borg .... what like 400 years older? jrSmiley_9_smiley_image.gif

I was entertained by the finale but it seemed kinda cheesy to me that our two biggest enemies suddenly became our allies.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
1.2.1  seeder  Dig  replied to  Sparty On @1.2    2 months ago
Go  back and watch some of the last few episodes.    I felt like they were hinting at it for awhile.   Wasn’t  a surprise to me.

Yeah, I know. They started it in the season 1 finale when they were shown holding hands. The kiss wasn't a surprise to me, either, just cringe-inducing.

Well .... she is a Borg .... what like 400 years older?

But still, lol.

I was entertained by the finale but it seemed kinda cheesy to me that our two biggest enemies suddenly became our allies.

I might be having a brain fart here, but who's the second one? Do you mean Q?

I'm really hoping they leave the Borg as we know them in the original timeline alone. I mean, that timeline supposedly got repaired, so it shouldn't have changed, right? Queen Agnes could have just been off doing her own thing all that time, staying secretive and not being evil. I'm crossing my fingers for something like that, anyway.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
1.2.2  Sparty On  replied to  Dig @1.2.1    2 months ago

Yeah, the Borg and Q.    Q was always screwing with Picard and you didn’t really know until the end that that had somehow changed.

I agree, they have left the Borg thing open to all possibilities.

A pretty good ending all in all for Picard IMO.

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
Professor Quiet
2  Ed-NavDoc    2 months ago

One thing I could not figure out was why Rios just did not take the doctor and her son to the future with him. Would have been a lot simpler to me.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
2.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @2    2 months ago

I don't think she'd have left her clinic.  She was doing a lot of good in her own time, and knew it.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
2.2  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @2    2 months ago

I think he seemed like he enjoyed the past more. I hated that he died in a bar fight, but oh well.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
2.3  seeder  Dig  replied to  Ed-NavDoc @2    2 months ago

I think they wanted it to look like Rios didn't really fit in his own time, and would be happier in the past.

Strange that Picard didn't even bat an eye at it. Rios could have messed the whole timeline up again. Picard at least ordered the crew to stay out of the way in First Contact when they thought they were going to be stranded in the past. He didn't even bother with Rios. I thought it was a little odd that he didn't seem to care this time.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
2.3.1  sandy-2021492  replied to  Dig @2.3    2 months ago
Rios could have messed the whole timeline up again.

Given his behavior so far, I'd say it was more likely than not.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
2.3.2  seeder  Dig  replied to  sandy-2021492 @2.3.1    2 months ago

No kidding. He was unexpectedly reckless bringing Teresa and her kid onto the ship. After doing that he's probably one of the last people you'd want to just leave in the past. But as long as they don't have any tech to prove anything, stories that he, Teresa, or the kid let slip might just make people think they're crazy or something, lol.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
3  Sparty On    2 months ago

The Borg are now our buddies ..... excellent!

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
3.1  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Sparty On @3    2 months ago

Well, now with Q dead, I guess better this way.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
3.1.1  Sparty On  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1    2 months ago

Lots of questions.   This “galactic event,” natural phenomenon or artificially made?    If not natural then by who and to what end?      The Borg or Q pulling another stutter step?     Some new danger?

They left this baby wide open .....

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
3.1.2  seeder  Dig  replied to  Sparty On @3.1.1    2 months ago
Lots of questions.   This “galactic event,” natural phenomenon or artificially made?

They said it was the formation of a new transwarp conduit, but I thought those had always been presented as being Borg technology. The fact that Borg Agnes knew it was coming makes me wonder if she didn't have something to do with it. She was awfully keen to "guard" it afterward.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
3.1.3  sandy-2021492  replied to  Dig @3.1.2    2 months ago
makes me wonder if she didn't have something to do with it. She was awfully keen to "guard" it afterward.

Don't make me hate on Agnes!

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
3.1.4  seeder  Dig  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3.1.3    2 months ago

Sorry, lol. I could be wrong, of course.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
3.1.5  Sparty On  replied to  Dig @3.1.4    2 months ago

It’s a definite possibility for a story line.     Getting the cattle to help the wolf protect the cattle, would be a master stroke and would preserve the resource for the wolf.

 
 
 
evilgenius
PhD Guide
4  evilgenius    2 months ago

The Traveler feels line a new spin off show. I know neither of the actors there make it into season 3. 

I think it was mentioned on one of the shows that the Borg have different "Hives". The evil Borg may very well still be out there. I'd love to see a showdown between the evil Borg queen and Agnes good Borg queen. Again Agnes doesn't show up in season 3.

The only returning characters are Pickard (of course) Seven, Raffi and Lauris. I also heard it starts a year after the end of season 2.

 
 

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