Star Trek Reveals A TNG Character Became Enterprise Captain After Picard

  
Via:  Dig  •  7 months ago  •  8 comments

By:   JOHN ORQUIOLA

Star Trek Reveals A TNG Character Became Enterprise Captain After Picard
The Star Trek: Picard mystery of who became Captain of the Enterprise has been answered: Jean-Luc's replacement is a familiar face from TNG.

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The new canonical   Star Trek: Picard   prequel novel has revealed who replaced Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart) as the Captain of the Enterprise:   Worf   (Michael Dorn).   Star Trek: Picard   is set 20 years after the final   Star Trek: The Next Generation   movie,   Star Trek: Nemesis , and by the time the new series picks up, Picard has been retired from Starfleet for 15 years. The TV series hasn't answered who took over the captain's chair of the U.S.S. Enterprise-E in Picard's stead but now we know it was Starfleet's most prominent Klingon.

Full article at Screen Rant


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Dig
1  seeder  Dig    7 months ago

More from the article:

The details of Captain Worf's ascension to commanding the Enterprise-E are found in Star Trek: Picard: The Last Best Hope by Una McCormack. Set between the years 2381-2385, The Last Best Hope fills in Star Trek: Picard 's backstory about the Romulan sun going supernova, how Admiral Picard was tapped to lead the Federation's mission to rescue the Romulans (a plan which was unpopular with many of the Federation's member words), and the construction of the rescue fleet at the Utopia Planitia Fleetyards on Mars - which would be destroyed by an attack by rogue synthetics in 2385. The Last Best Hope also explains Picard's decision to leave the Enterprise to take command of the U.S.S. Verity and handpicking Romulan expert Lt. Commander Raffi Musiker (Michelle Hurd) as his First Officer.

I'm guessing they intend for this book to serve as a kind of 'backstory bible' for the Picard series. Not a bad idea, really. If you don't have time to do it on screen, then flesh it out in an official companion book.

Hmm. The initial hardcover looks to be on sale for only 12 bucks at Amazon , which is kind of weird for a new release, isn't it? It's cheaper than the kindle version. I don't get it, but oh well. Better for us, I guess.

I don't usually bother with Trek novels, but I might have to grab this one.

 
 
 
Gordy327
1.1  Gordy327  replied to  Dig @1    7 months ago

Has the book actually been deemed canon by CBS? Usually, canon material is on what is on screen. Books and other sources are usually not considered canon.

 
 
 
Dig
1.1.1  seeder  Dig  replied to  Gordy327 @1.1    7 months ago
Has the book actually been deemed canon by CBS?

I don't know. I took it as official because the article went out of its way to describe it as canonical. Would they have done that if it wasn't, given the general rule that novels never are?

Usually, canon material is on what is on screen. Books and other sources are usually not considered canon.

I know. There's an article about it on both Memory Alpha (canon) and Memory Beta (non-canon), so go figure.

Maybe one of the show's producers will address it in an interview or something one of these days.

I'd say its safe to consider it canon until something in it is contradicted on-screen. I have a feeling it was written in cahoots with the TV production team. It was released to coincide with the start of the new series, after all.

Here's a book description I've found:

“Fans of the new   Star Trek: Picard   series have been clamoring to known what led up to the dramatic events that began in the show’s premiere episode. The answers to their questions lie in   Star Trek: The Last Best Hope   by   Una McCormack, an original novel and prequel to the television series. “This new series follows Jean-Luc Picard into the next chapter of his life, and   The Last Best Hope   sheds new light on what brought him there and features the new characters from the series, as well.”

And I went to Amazon and zoomed in on the back cover. It's copyrighted 2020 CBS Studios, but for all I know every Star Trek book says something like that. Here's a screen shot:

384

What do you think?

 
 
 
Gordy327
1.1.2  Gordy327  replied to  Dig @1.1.1    7 months ago
I don't know. I took it as official because the article went out of its way to describe it as canonical. Would they have done that if it wasn't, given the general rule that novels never are?

Typically, novels are not considered canon unless specifically deemed so by the studio. Movie novels might be an exception to that rule, as they are derived from the movie itself, often presenting more detail or backstory. But if the studio itself has not declared the novel to be canon, then I would question claims of canonicity. For example, when ST: the Animated series came out, there was question as to whether the series was considered part of TOS canon. ST: TAS is considered to cover years 4 & 5 of the Enterprise's 5-year mission. But for many years, TAS was largely considered non-canon until the studio announced that it was in fact canon material.

I know. There's an article about it on both Memory Alpha (canon) and Memory Beta (non-canon), so go figure.

Memory Alpha is the next best source for info. However, it does contain both canon and non-canon information. Often, non-canon sources are used to fill in gaps in the story or plot. Memory Beta is not canon material, but rather information to coincide with canon or other source material. Kind of like a filler.

Maybe one of the show's producers will address it in an interview or something one of these days.

That would certainly clear things up. Especially since at the conclusion of Nemesis, Worf was the Federation Ambassador to Qo'noS and Picard was still Captain of the Enterprise. Unless an episode details who took command of the Enterprise after Capt. Picard resigned or the studio issues a formal canon statement, one must take claims of Worf or whomever commanded the Enterprise with a grain of salt. I'd like to see the Enterprise E make an appearance in Picard.

I'd say its safe to consider it canon until something in it is contradicted on-screen.

I'd say the opposite is true.

I have a feeling it was written in cahoots with the TV production team. It was released to coincide with the start of the new series, after all.

It may have been written as a tie in. But that alone does not qualify it as established canon.

It's copyrighted 2020 CBS Studios, but for all I know every Star Trek book says something like that. 

Yes, CBS owns the copyright to ST and related works. Anyone who writes a ST based novel or story must follow certain legal guidelines with respect to copyright.

 
 
 
Dig
1.1.3  seeder  Dig  replied to  Gordy327 @1.1.2    7 months ago

Regardless, I just ordered it. 

If other people did we could do a NT book club type of thing with it.

 
 
 
Save Me Jebus
2  Save Me Jebus    7 months ago

I've never read any of the books, so where did Riker go? I assumed that's why he kept passing up other opportunities in order to ultimately get to Captain the Enterprise.

 
 
 
Gordy327
2.1  Gordy327  replied to  Save Me Jebus @2    7 months ago

After the events of ST Nemesis, Riker assumed command of the USS Titan. I think there is a series of books focused on his tenure abord the Titan.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
3  Perrie Halpern R.A.    7 months ago

Well, I just found out about "Lower Decks" which will be an animated official series. Now a book? A lot to keep up with.

 
 
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