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Biden Announces 'Monumental' Marijuana Rescheduling, DOJ To Take Next Steps - Aurora Cannabis (NASDAQ:ACB), Canopy Gwth (NASDAQ:CGC) - Benzinga

  
Via:  Just Jim NC TttH  •  4 weeks ago  •  73 comments

By:   Maureen Meehan (Benzinga)

Biden Announces 'Monumental' Marijuana Rescheduling, DOJ To Take Next Steps - Aurora Cannabis (NASDAQ:ACB), Canopy Gwth (NASDAQ:CGC) - Benzinga
Biden announces plan to reclassify marijuana from Schedule I to III, reversing inequities and removing barriers for Americans. Cannabis stocks rise.

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President Joe Biden announced on Thursday that his administration is officially moving to reschedule marijuana under federal law, while praising what he called a "monumental" step.

"Today my administration took a major step to reclassify marijuana from a schedule one drug to a schedule three drug. It's an important move toward reversing long-standing inequities. Today's announcement builds on the work we've already done, and it adds to the action we've taken to lift barriers to housing, employment, small business loans and so much more for tens of thousands of Americans," Biden said.

Justice Dept. On The Move


The Justice Department is expected to post its proposed rules to move cannabis from Schedule I to Schedule III under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) in the Federal Register, a senior administration official said on Thursday. A 60-day public comment period will follow.

"Look folks, no one should be in jail for merely using or possessing marijuana. Period," the president said. "Far too many lives have been upended because of a failed approach to marijuana and I'm committed to righting those wrongs. You have my word on it."

The White House announcement comes several weeks after the Department of Justice confirmed the DEA was moving to reclassify cannabis as a Schedule III drug.

Cannabis Stocks Rose On The News


Following the historic announcement, cannabis stocks quickly reacted with AdvisorShares Pure US Cannabis ETFMSOS trading up 7.54% at $10.34 per share at the time of writing. Another marijuana ETF, AdvisorShares Pure CannabisYOLO, was up 5.41% at $4.4 per share.

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Popular weed giants, Canopy Growth CGC Aurora Cannabis ACB were trading 15.35% higher at $11.43 per share and 11.10% at $7.91 per share, respectfully.

Curaleaf HoldingsCURLF was slightly up, trading 5.98% higher at $5.95 per share, and one of the biggest cannabis players in Canada and the US, TilrayTLRY was trading just a bit higher or $6.75% with $2.21 per share.

The 19th Benzinga Cannabis Capital Conference, returns to Chicago this Oct. 8-9. Get your tickets now before prices surge by following this link.

Now Read: Mike Tyson's Cannabis Products Available In 'Even More Dispensaries' In Colorado Via New Partnership, Here's Where To Find Them

Image created using artificial intelligence via Midjourney and Shutterstock photo.

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© 2024 Benzinga.com. Benzinga does not provide investment advice. All rights reserved.


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Just Jim NC TttH
Professor Principal
1  seeder  Just Jim NC TttH    4 weeks ago

"I like to pander, Pandering maaaan. I got to pander, Pandering man"

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
1.1  evilone  replied to  Just Jim NC TttH @1    4 weeks ago
"I like to pander, Pandering maaaan"

This timing, and Biden's own past statements , make this obliviously true. I will say it was inevitable though. The dominoes have been falling since CO legalized... How much will big business put pressure on states now that haven't legalized yet?

 
 
 
afrayedknot
Junior Quiet
1.1.1  afrayedknot  replied to  evilone @1.1    4 weeks ago

“…inevitable…” 

….just as the repeal of prohibition was inevitable. Lots of federal money to be garnered, and as always…follow the money.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
1.1.2  Krishna  replied to  afrayedknot @1.1.1    4 weeks ago
Lots of federal money to be garnered, and as always…follow the money.

Yup.

Once they legalize it-- they can tax it!

 
 
 
JBB
Professor Principal
1.2  JBB  replied to  Just Jim NC TttH @1    4 weeks ago

[]

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.3  Vic Eldred  replied to  Just Jim NC TttH @1    4 weeks ago

Maybe Joe can just have Marc Elias give everyone who votes for him $100.

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Expert
1.4  Nerm_L  replied to  Just Jim NC TttH @1    4 weeks ago
"I like to pander, Pandering maaaan. I got to pander, Pandering man"

Sex, drugs, and rock 'n roll.  Wasn't that the Democrat triad during the 1970s -- when Biden was first elected to the Senate?  Biden was too old to be cool when being cool was a thing.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
2  Ronin2    4 weeks ago

Gateway drug users all across the US are rejoicing- as are the drug dealers- who can still sell cheaper than the legal dispensaries.

With possession no longer being a jailable crime- what do they have to lose?

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
2.1  CB  replied to  Ronin2 @2    4 weeks ago

Illegal drugs are yet illegal. That is, illegal 'dispensaries' (dealers) operating outside the boundaries of the law will result in fines, arrest, and imprisonment. The government will allow sales to the public. . .not people selling 'street' drugs.  Personal use will be fine. Selling in 'x' quantities will not be permitted! At least that is how I see the Justice department doing this.

It is time for the fearmongering just to control another human's freedom to end. Non-smokers of marijuana can go about their business and be none the worst off for what weed smokes are doing to/for themselves.

Finally, cigarette smoking is dangerous and no one calls it a 'gateway' drug to higher social accompaniment to an alcoholic cocktail.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2.1.1  Krishna  replied to  CB @2.1    4 weeks ago

That is, illegal 'dispensaries' (dealers) operating outside the boundaries of the law will result in fines, arrest, and imprisonment

Well that's the way it was before it was legal-- and that's the way it will continue to be after its legal.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
2.2  CB  replied to  Ronin2 @2    4 weeks ago

As for gateway drug use. . . 'weed' smokers are not interested in pills and the like. . . or 'Crack' or any such thing.  Furthermore, 'gateway' drug users have been taking stronger drugs anyway—illegally. That is the point of separating marijuana users from that 'pack' of folks.  Note, other drugs are not reclassified and remain classified "as they were."

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2.2.1  Krishna  replied to  CB @2.2    4 weeks ago
weed' smokers are not interested in pills and the like.

I've knownnmany "weed smokers" who also did other drugs.

Heck, I was one of them. I used to smoke Cannabis. Did Hashish, I also tried Peyote, MDMA (that was before it was called "Ecstasy"), Cocaine, and possibly some others I have forgotten. Actually Cocaine was one of my favouites, but I stopped after a while because I knew of the dangers... 

And of course beer, wine, Scotch (at college changed from Scotch to Bourbon-- had to be "politically correct". natch).

Oh-- I forgot-- you mentioned pills. I used to do Quaaludes -- both the "pharmies" and the knockoffs. 

Now I occasionally have a mixed drink when visiting friends-- but that's rare. I don't touch any recreational drugs at all-- and when I do drink when alone I may have one glass of wine once or twice/week.

But to say that smokers don't do other drugs-- what makes you so sure you know what everyone else does?

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
2.2.2  CB  replied to  Krishna @2.2.1    4 weeks ago
But to say that smokers don't do other drugs-- what makes you so sure you know what everyone else does?

There are always exceptions to the rule-people like yourself. (And you are not alone, I have done my share of drugs too.) However, I am talking about 'now' that drugs are legal and from what I see young people are ditching some of those other drugs. . . to be legal. (It's a beautiful thing in that sense.) 

Let's just put it this way,. . . marijuana is being made legal for 'all' who wish to indulge it safely. People of a certain age with various age-related medical problems can benefit from the properties of marijuana in ways they can not from some of the stronger stuff. So it is advisable to be smart about not doing the 'gateway thing' for them. As for the younger people-not all people like 'uppers and downers" in their state of being high unless they want to be 'f-ked up,' and suffer from a literal addiction (that is more burdensome to carry through life than a 'joint' habit.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2.2.3  Krishna  replied to  CB @2.2.2    4 weeks ago
People of a certain age with various age-related medical problems can benefit from the properties of marijuana in ways they can not from some of the stronger stuff.

Actually there's a lot of research going on re: possible legit medical uses of psychedelics (things like LSD, Ibogaine, many others).

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
2.2.4  CB  replied to  Krishna @2.2.3    4 weeks ago

I have seen some stories and television presentations about it. I think it is interesting and  will be more so once all the science is properly considered.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2.2.5  Krishna  replied to  Krishna @2.2.3    4 weeks ago
Actually there's a lot of research going on re: possible legit medical uses of psychedelics (things like LSD, Ibogaine, many others).

Full Disclosure: I own shares of Mindmed stock. 

Disclaimer: This is a highly speculative stock, I am not advising purchasing shares of this company. Investing in these sorts of stocks may result in the lost of some or all of your invested capital.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
2.3  Tessylo  replied to  Ronin2 @2    4 weeks ago

There is no such thig as a gateway drug user. I haven't had to go to my 'drug dealer' since last July

[]

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2.3.1  Krishna  replied to  Tessylo @2.3    4 weeks ago
There is no such thig as a gateway drug user. I haven't had to go to my 'drug dealer' since last July

Since July?

OMG that shocking!

You really need to up your drug usage!!!

 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Guide
2.4  Tacos!  replied to  Ronin2 @2    4 weeks ago
Gateway drug users all across the US are rejoicing

Stop with the puritan BS, please. Did you know coffee is considered a gateway drug? Alcohol? Tobacco? They are. Do you want to ban those things? I doubt it. 

Should we just lock people up and throw away the key if they consume anything that might alter their body chemistry, no matter how mildly?

10c0gu.jpg

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2.4.1  Krishna  replied to  Tacos! @2.4    4 weeks ago
Should we just lock people up and throw away the key if they consume anything that might alter their body chemistry, no matter how mildly?

I wonder-- don't some people use the term "Gateway drug" to imply that once a person starts using some "milder" drug (cannabis, or even beer)-- that leads to to stuff like Crack Cocaine, etc. It seems to me that using the term "Gateway Drugs" implies the speaker believes that people don't have free will.

 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Guide
2.4.2  Tacos!  replied to  Krishna @2.4.1    4 weeks ago

It has always kind of struck me as a BS 20/20 hindsight pseudoscience. You get someone whose addiction is destroying their life, and you trace back their life to the fact that they used to smoke cannabis. Ergo, smoking pot leads to a relentless heroin epidemic.

Of course this doesn’t account for the millions of people who smoke pot and never do anything more serious than that.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
2.4.3  CB  replied to  Tacos! @2.4.2    4 weeks ago
[T]his doesn’t account for the millions of people who smoke pot and never do anything more serious than that.

This is the crux of the argument, not all or 'many' drug users bother to try an assortment or plethora of drugs or care for 'mixing' highs-individuals will 'shop' for their drug of choice and settle on it for their own unique set of circumstances. People who promulgate, package, and promote 'bad news' drug use are after promoting their own purposes or group agenda first and foremost seeking to stop 'all' from getting out of the proverbial box(es) which someone or group thinks we all should exist.

That is, what such people do is share fear-mongering propaganda techniques and tactics which they have found to work at keeping others in line with their worldview (and not their own). Similar to what we see with the prolife movement which grifts and makes money and careers off promoting a supposed "culture of life" though evidence proves that once a life is brought into this world-prolife interests in said life wanes.

Of course, finding and printing the most negative and drug defeatists 'cases' to exploit helps with spreading the negative messaging and giving it 'stickability' too.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2.4.4  Krishna  replied to  Tacos! @2.4    4 weeks ago
Do you want to ban those things? I doubt it. 

I dunno.

Based on some of the comments here-- some people might want to ban some of those things!

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2.4.5  Krishna  replied to  Tacos! @2.4.2    4 weeks ago
It has always kind of struck me as a BS 20/20 hindsight pseudoscience. You get someone whose addiction is destroying their life, and you trace back their life to the fact that they used to smoke cannabis. Ergo, smoking pot leads to a relentless heroin epidemic. Of course this doesn’t account for the millions of people who smoke pot and never do anything more serious than that.
I am convinced that there is such a thing as an "addictive personality"> Some people tend to get addicted to something (which may or may not be a chemical) and really can't stop using it until they get help. And even then, some of these people go back to it.
OTOH there are people who, for whatever reason, can stop overuse when they realize their habit is a problem-- some can even do it without help.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2.5  Krishna  replied to  Ronin2 @2    4 weeks ago
With possession no longer being a jailable crime- what do they have to lose?

They will actually lose some business.

(Some people will continue to buy from illegal dealers because its cheaper, but some will stop buying from illegal sources and be willing to pay a little more to buy it legally).

 
 
 
Freefaller
Professor Quiet
3  Freefaller    4 weeks ago

As long as no one forces me or others to partake there's no harm 

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
3.1  Tessylo  replied to  Freefaller @3    4 weeks ago

Who would force you or others to partake??????????????

 
 
 
Freefaller
Professor Quiet
3.1.1  Freefaller  replied to  Tessylo @3.1    4 weeks ago

No one that I can think of, which was the point

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
3.1.2  Tessylo  replied to  Freefaller @3.1.1    4 weeks ago

Kind of pointless

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
3.1.3  CB  replied to  Tessylo @3.1.2    4 weeks ago

You and Freefaller are in agreement. That is, my understanding of comment 3 is Freefaller is stating no one is harmed by what another does by ingesting marijuana.

 
 
 
Freefaller
Professor Quiet
3.1.4  Freefaller  replied to  Tessylo @3.1.2    4 weeks ago

You're certainly entitled to your beliefs.  I'll assume I am as well

 
 
 
Freefaller
Professor Quiet
3.1.5  Freefaller  replied to  CB @3.1.3    4 weeks ago

CB you are correct

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
3.1.6  Krishna  replied to  Tessylo @3.1    4 weeks ago
Who would force you or others to partake??????????????

Some abusive husbands  might force their wives to do various things...I suppose some with a drug habit might force their wives to do the drug as well (?)

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
3.1.7  Krishna  replied to  CB @3.1.3    4 weeks ago
stating no one is harmed by what another does by ingesting marijuana.

Unless they do something like driving a car while high and it impairs their judgement....

(I've known Cannabis users who claim they are just as alert when they're high as when not, and drive while stoned).

 
 
 
Snuffy
Professor Participates
3.1.8  Snuffy  replied to  Krishna @3.1.7    4 weeks ago

I certainly will not advocate for stoned and driving, however there have been great changes in marijuana since our youth experience with weed. Back then it was just weed. Today there are different strains that can be used for different purposes. I have experienced sativa which for me did not impact my ability to think or do things. All it really did was smooth chronic pain but left my brain alone. I was able to do everything that I would normally do without any restriction in mental abilities and/or comprehension. Hybrid and Indica do definitely impact the brain and it's ability to think.

I still would not drive a car or do anything that might impact other people while on it but then I try to think of myself as a bit rational.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
3.1.9  Sparty On  replied to  Snuffy @3.1.8    4 weeks ago

As I noted elsewhere, a positive test and impairment can be two different things.     I’ve been out of it for a few years but back then “legally” a positive test means impairment.     If someone working for me kills someone on the job, tests positive, it may void some of my companies liability coverage for such things.

It is not as simple as “yeah man, I’m totally fine when I’m stoned.”

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
3.1.10  CB  replied to  Krishna @3.1.7    4 weeks ago

That is an interesting point, Krishna! I often wonder where the 'stoners' are out there, as I don't encounter such problem drivers in city or on the freeways. Don't get me wrong, I have been in 'front' of a drunk driver before headed my way. . . he was losing control of his car at high speed in a turn. . .and sped right pass me and my car on the left. After a number of years, I have yet to encounter a stoner doing something out of the ordinary on the road. Are they out there? I imagine. . .but so far so good.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
3.1.11  CB  replied to  Snuffy @3.1.8    4 weeks ago
Today there are different strains that can be used for different purposes. I have experienced sativa which for me did not impact my ability to think or do things. All it really did was smooth chronic pain but left my brain alone.

Interesting. Since marijuana is legal, I participate. I, like you, don't like hybrid weed much as it messes with my sleep. I love Indica brands because of the psychotropic sleep-inducing effects, and have stayed away from Sativa brands because I considered them as problematic for my waking state. You say that is not the case. . . interesting. I would love to here more about the chronic pain aspect. (I have yet to try a gummie/edible. Even though I have been given samples before. . . they just decorate age out in a drawer in their packagings.)

 
 
 
Snuffy
Professor Participates
3.1.12  Snuffy  replied to  CB @3.1.10    4 weeks ago

Yeah, it's legal here in Arizona. When I'm out driving I am concerned about it but driving in Phoenix there's a lot to be concerned about what with drunks, distracted drivers, the simple truth that everyone is driving at least 10 MPH over the posted limit if not more. And you can smell it as you are driving down the freeways. The simple truth is that you really have to watch what others are doing on the roads at all times, and 'stoners' are just another group one has to watch for. 

I won't drive the day I "partake", it's one of the simple rules that I live by. Also won't use it when my daughter and granddaughter are at home with me. 

 
 
 
Snuffy
Professor Participates
3.1.13  Snuffy  replied to  CB @3.1.11    4 weeks ago

I have no problems falling asleep and if I had a better bladder I would be able to sleep longer. But I don't care for the Indica brands as they make me too brain & body dead and I don't like that. I've never tried it for sleeping however, are your dreams more interesting? I have a daughter who works in a dispensary and their nickname for Indica is 'In-the-couch'.

I do like hybrid gummies, I like to watch YouTube music videos and play Solitaire when high.  I think it's fun entertainment.

As far as the sativa brands, my knees are shot. I have another series of the gel shots starting next week, but that only lasts a few years. I will probably have to go for knee replacements in a few more years. After a full day, my knees are very sore and feel like they are burning but the sativa will numb the pain and feeling enough that I don't notice it so I'm not in pain when I go to bed. I don't need it every day, but after a very active day it's a welcome relief. Public notice, every body is different so the relief I get may not be the same as you get. But if you give it a try I hope it works for you.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
3.1.14  CB  replied to  Snuffy @3.1.13    4 weeks ago

I used to take Ambien until it turned on me with sleep hallucinations (of prolonged and rapid gunfire) in my sleep; turned to melatonin and eventually it did the same thing: sleep hallucinations. When it occurred with melatonin I knew what was happening and what to do about it. Talked to several friends and they mentioned doing a 'couple of puffs' of marijuana (MJ) before bed. . . and so far it (Indica) works without obvious side-effect!

That said, you asked the right question: My dreams on weed. . . don't really happen. I even asked my doctor (who knows about this) about the lack of dreaming and does it mean that MJ stops me from entering REM sleep. . . she stated that I still dream, but maybe/just don't remember it.

I will try this last gummy sample package I have. . . will make time to do it. I was told to try one not the two together at once. . . and wait for something to happen.

I have stayed away from the Sativa for fear of developing a psychological dependence during my wake hours. . . . don't know if I want it. . .but CBD maybe. Inching closer to trying those brands for chronic pain.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
3.1.15  CB  replied to  CB @3.1.14    4 weeks ago

BTW, I have no problem falling asleep after a long day. . . my "chronic' problem with sleep is STAYING ASLEEP during the night (I hate sleeping or feeling like falling to sleep in the day time). Good sharing 'together' Snuffy. We can learn from (each) others here! I appreciate that when it happens.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
3.2  Krishna  replied to  Freefaller @3    4 weeks ago
As long as no one forces me or others to partake there's no harm

Well various governments at various times forced people-- or perhaps more accurately put a lot of pressure on people-- to have Covid shots and other vaccines. (This is not meant to be a judgement-- its just an observation.).

 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Guide
4  Tacos!    4 weeks ago

Am I supposed to applaud? What took so long? This is literally decades overdue.

No, it's worse than that. It should have never happened in the first place. This intoxicating substance wasn't part of the dominant white culture, so it was easily outlawed. All you need to do to see the contrast is look at how we have treated alcohol and tobacco, both of which are objectively more harmful than cannabis.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
4.1  CB  replied to  Tacos! @4    4 weeks ago

And golly, as a nation we have not even begin the discussion about processed foods and the damaging effects of a lifetime of that. . . 'stuff'! Processed foods are a generational curse that still is going on. . . .  Alas, it's "Liberty." 

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
4.2  evilone  replied to  Tacos! @4    4 weeks ago
This is literally decades overdue.

One could argue changing it's place on the schedule is too little too late. This move doesn't legalize marijuana. It only changes the DoJ's priority on it. It will make it easier on labs to study it which, I think is a good thing.  

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
4.3  Krishna  replied to  Tacos! @4    4 weeks ago
All you need to do to see the contrast is look at how we have treated alcohol and tobacco, both of which are objectively more harmful than cannabis.

Remember when there were ads like this on TV?

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
4.4  Krishna  replied to  Tacos! @4    4 weeks ago
All you need to do to see the contrast is look at how we have treated alcohol and tobacco, both of which are objectively more harmful than cannabis.

BTW, if anyone wants to learn how dangerous alcohol can be (to some addiction prone people--- because there are many people that can drink without having problems)-- and if you're a curious person-- I highly recommend going to an AA ("Alcoholics Anonymous") meeting. I've been to a few-- I learned a lot!

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
4.4.1  Krishna  replied to  Krishna @4.4    4 weeks ago
I highly recommend going to an AA ("Alcoholics Anonymous") meeting.

If not AA, there are many other types of these anti-addiction meetings. (They are all part of the same type of program-- its called "the Twelve Step Program"). 

There's Debtor's Anonymous, Cocaine Users Anonymous, Overeaters Anonymous, etc.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
4.5  Krishna  replied to  Tacos! @4    4 weeks ago
All you need to do to see the contrast is look at how we have treated alcohol 

Now I'm curious. Do they still teach History in the public schools?

Perhaps they merely omit certain minor details?

Apparently many people are unaware of what happened during Prohibition (???). Because during Prohibition the use of Alcohol was "limited by the government"-nor was it "regulated".

Rather it was totally forbidden!!!

The  Prohibition era  was the period from 1920 to 1933 when the  United States   prohibited the production, importation, transportation and sale of  alcoholic beverages . [1]  

The alcohol industry was curtailed by a succession of state legislatures, and finally ended nationwide under the  Eighteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution , ratified on January 16, 1919

Not only was it illegal-- but we actually passed an Amendment to the Constitution!

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
5  Mark in Wyoming     4 weeks ago

I think it is about time.

I'm interested to see how some states where it's currently illegal handle it, likely controlled and taxed like booze and tobacco.

Businesses like bars will be interesting to see if it's allowed in the establishments. But most of those are non smoking now, some do have outside smoking areas if they have the room and conform to local ordinances for outside drinking.

 
 
 
GregTx
Professor Guide
5.1  GregTx  replied to  Mark in Wyoming @5    4 weeks ago

I'm curious as to how employers will handle it.

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
5.1.1  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  GregTx @5.1    4 weeks ago

Won't matter for me , even if I were not totally retiring this year , I still hold a CDL class A, I would still have to be able to pass a piss test, and companies will still have to get the vehicle insurance, and they get discounts if they drug test regularly.

So I doubt very much will change on that front.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
5.1.2  Sparty On  replied to  GregTx @5.1    4 weeks ago

Our policy required a person to be sober while on the job.    This includes impairment caused by alcohol and drugs.

Drunks can’t be drunk and stoners can’t be stoned.    The problem lies within testing.    Testing BAC is much easier and quicker than most drugs tests.

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
5.1.3  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  Sparty On @5.1.2    4 weeks ago

And that is why I do not partake of the devil's lettuce, those I know that do understand that I won't risk losing my lic over even just a casual secondhand contact,  thanks to fed regulations , if I lose my CDL I lose the right to drive anything , even a car , the lics are no longer seperate like they use to be. So a hot piss test means I'm on foot, and there are no exemptions.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
5.1.4  Sparty On  replied to  Mark in Wyoming @5.1.3    4 weeks ago

As it should be.    Shit you’re operating and much of what use in constructions needs a sober mind to operate safely.    People do enough stupid shit while sober.    No need to exacerbate it worse with wasted staff.

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
5.1.5  evilone  replied to  GregTx @5.1    4 weeks ago
I'm curious as to how employers will handle it.

Most legalized states have specific jobs that can still be employer tested. Otherwise employees are protected for what they do on their off time.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
5.1.6  Krishna  replied to  evilone @5.1.5    4 weeks ago
Otherwise employees are protected for what they do on their off time.

But what if they smoke just before work (on their off time) and come into work high? Should that be a right that is "protected"?

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
5.1.7  Krishna  replied to  Mark in Wyoming @5.1.3    4 weeks ago
I do not partake of the devil's lettuce,

Yes-- and there have been warnings, down through the ages, about partaking of such evils.. Here's one for your listening pleasure! jrSmiley_2_smiley_image.png ):

MARIJUANA, THE DEVIL'S FLOWER BY MR. SUNSHINE

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
5.1.8  CB  replied to  Krishna @5.1.6    4 weeks ago

May I? Coming/going to work high is unprofessional. That is, no one pays for unprofessional behavior when it is found out to be the case.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
5.1.9  Krishna  replied to  CB @5.1.8    4 weeks ago
May I?

I'm not sure if I'm ready to grant permission yet.

Let me think about it for a while and i'll get back to you. jrSmiley_2_smiley_image.png

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
5.1.10  Krishna  replied to  CB @5.1.8    4 weeks ago
That is, no one pays for unprofessional behavior when it is found out to be the case.

No one?

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
5.1.11  Krishna  replied to  Sparty On @5.1.2    4 weeks ago
This includes impairment caused by alcohol and drugs.

I would imagine that many stoners would argue that smoking Cannabis doesn't cause any "impairment", and that these requirements are a result of a Fascistic government infringing on their rights!

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
5.1.12  Sparty On  replied to  Krishna @5.1.11    4 weeks ago

I’m sure they would but they would wrong.     Impairment on a job site is a safety concern.   And as we strive to make the work place safer, is absolutely counterproductive to achieving that goal.

No debate required.

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
5.1.13  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  Krishna @5.1.7    4 weeks ago

I'm more of a Jim Stafford generation  and his tune , the Wildwood weed.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
5.1.14  CB  replied to  Krishna @5.1.10    4 weeks ago

Do try to understand what I am taking time to share here, please.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
5.2  Krishna  replied to  Mark in Wyoming @5    4 weeks ago
I'm interested to see how some states where it's currently illegal handle it, likely controlled and taxed like booze and tobacco.

As a general rule, most governments tax whatever they can...

(And raise taxes, over time . . . as much as they can).

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
5.3  Krishna  replied to  Mark in Wyoming @5    4 weeks ago
I'm interested to see how some states where it's currently illegal handle it, likely controlled and taxed like booze and tobacco.

I've read that there are some unique difficulties for those business owners. I heard about this a while back, it may have changed.

For example, while while its currently non-criminalized in certain states, while its still legal on the Federal level-- banks don't want to deal with these business for fear of government repercussions.

So store owners can't just go to the bank every day and deposit the proceeds.  So what to do? Well, they have an armored truck come by every day at the close of business to take the money to a safe, (This is a major expense). 

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
5.3.1  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  Krishna @5.3    4 weeks ago

Ever hear of civil forfeiture? The feds and the state can use that .

Though the state may decriminalize or legalize something, another government entity can keep it illegal, and anything connected can be seized and kept by the government and disposed of at their discretion.

Large sums of cash with no paper trails are generally assumed to have been gained through illegal activity. It gets turned around to instead of them having to prove that's the case, the person with the money has to prove it wasn't.

Can that be done without bank records or a paper trail? 

 
 
 
charger 383
Professor Silent
6  charger 383    4 weeks ago

Why didn't he do this when he first took over?  Is he doing it now for election help?  

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
6.1  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  charger 383 @6    4 weeks ago

I have a theory about such things.

Bear with me here, I think there are issues that could be simply resolved if people have simple honest discussions, but politicians get involved.

And some issues that can be easily solved are held back in a way and only approached by those politicians when it is in their best interests. Kind of like the fire axes in the glass cases in the hallway , big sign on them , break glass in case of emergency only.

 And it's the politician that determines when to break the glass and what constitutes an emergency about the issue.

Some say follow the money, I think timing has and plays a part in things as well.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
6.1.1  CB  replied to  Mark in Wyoming @6.1    4 weeks ago

I agree. There are ideal moments and then there are 'essential' moments, and politicians like the rest of us are 'left' to pick their moments based on a number of considerations and factors.

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
6.2  Sparty On  replied to  charger 383 @6    4 weeks ago

Of course he is.   No doubt.

 
 

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