Oath Keepers leader and 10 others charged with 'seditious conspiracy' - CNNPolitics

  
Via:  Gsquared  •  one week ago  •  37 comments

By:   Katelyn Polantz, Hannah Rabinowitz, Holmes Lybrand, and Tierney Sneed (CNN)

Oath Keepers leader and 10 others charged with 'seditious conspiracy' - CNNPolitics
The Justice Department has charged 11 defendants with seditious conspiracy related to the Capitol attack on January 6, 2021, including the leader of the Oath Keepers, Stewart Rhodes.

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These are the first indictments for "seditious conspiracy" related to the January 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol.  Will there be more coming?  Stay tuned, folks!

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S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



The Justice Department has charged 11 defendants with seditious conspiracy related to the Capitol attack on January 6, 2021, including the leader of the Oath Keepers, Stewart Rhodes.

The new indictment, handed down by a grand jury on Wednesday and made public Thursday, alleges that Rhodes and his co-conspirators engaged in a conspiracy to "oppose the lawful transfer of presidential power by force, by preventing, hindering, or delaying by force execution of laws governing the transfer of power."

Prosecutors have previously said that Rhodes used Signal during the attack to communicate with other members of the Oath Keepers who were at the Capitol. 

"All I see Trump doing is complaining. I see no intent by him to do anything," Rhodes allegedly wrote. "So the patriots are taking it into their own hands. They've had enough," he allegedly said on Signal at 1:38 p.m. that day, shortly after the siege had begun.

The charges mark a dramatic change in the Justice Department's January 6 probe. Attorney General Merrick Garland said in a speech last week commemorating the Capitol attack that the department was "committed to holding all January 6th perpetrators, at any level, accountable under law -- whether they were present that day or were otherwise criminally responsible for the assault on our democracy."

Rhodes has also been of interest to the House's January 6 investigation, which issued subpoenas in November for him and his organization for a deposition and documents related to the events of that day.

CNN reported in July that Rhodes gave a voluntary interview to the FBI and that investigators seized his cell phone. He has denied all wrongdoing.

According to previous court filings submitted by the Justice Department in other cases, Rhodes said at a November 2020 online meeting, "We're going to defend the president, the duly elected president, and we call on him to do what needs to be done to save our country. Because if you don't guys, you're going to be in a bloody, bloody civil war and a bloody -- you can call it an insurrection, or you can call it a war or fight."

Rhodes' lawyer, Jonathan Moseley, confirmed the arrest.

 


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Gsquared
Junior Principal
1  seeder  Gsquared    one week ago

For the right-wingers who keep bellowing about no seditious conspiracy charges, here they are.

Interestingly, though, the alleged statement by Rhodes seems to exonerate Trump from the Oath Keepers' conspiracy.  I wonder...

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.1  Texan1211  replied to  Gsquared @1    one week ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  Gsquared @1    one week ago

Oh...wow. Finally someone is indicted for conspiracy to commit sedition...aka treason

 
 
 
Gsquared
Junior Principal
1.2.1  seeder  Gsquared  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.2    one week ago

There are 11 defendants subject to this indictment.  There could be more coming.  

A question that arises is if there is one overarching conspiracy or possibly several unrelated conspiracies.  We still have a lot to learn about this whole event.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
1.2.2  Ozzwald  replied to  Gsquared @1.2.1    one week ago
A question that arises is if there is one overarching conspiracy or possibly several unrelated conspiracies.

It is starting to sound to me like it was Trump's people, and other extreme right wingers, that lit the match under these domestic terrorist group(s).  They brought forth the idea, then backed away and let them do what they wanted.

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Guide
1.2.3  evilgenius  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.2    one week ago
Finally someone is indicted for conspiracy to commit sedition...aka treason

It's good to finally see the charges, but sedition and treason are 2 different charges. Words do matter.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.2.4  Trout Giggles  replied to  evilgenius @1.2.3    one week ago

Thank-you.

 
 
 
Gsquared
Junior Principal
1.2.5  seeder  Gsquared  replied to  Ozzwald @1.2.2    one week ago

Trump did publicly invite them to come to D.C. on January 6th, and he promised it would be "wild".

 
 
 
gooseisback
Freshman Silent
1.3  gooseisback  replied to  Gsquared @1    one week ago
alleged statement by Rhodes seems to exonerate Trump

You have just ruined a bunch of Liberals day.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.3.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  gooseisback @1.3    one week ago

Not necessarily. I doubt Rhodes was privy to everything that was going on behind the scenes that day

 
 
 
gooseisback
Freshman Silent
1.3.2  gooseisback  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.3.1    one week ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
1.3.3  Ozzwald  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.3.1    one week ago
Not necessarily. I doubt Rhodes was privy to everything that was going on behind the scenes that day

Plus, keep in mind that Trump would not be a part of the planning.  He's not that smart and has too big a mouth for anything that sensitive.  But that does not mean he was not aware of something.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.3.4  JohnRussell  replied to  Ozzwald @1.3.3    one week ago

Trump knew everything. He may not have planned it all, except for his plans for Pence to name him president, but he was kept abreast of it all. 

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.3.5  devangelical  replied to  Ozzwald @1.3.3    one week ago

he had to have plausible deniability. it was an unrehearsed rendition of the new reality show traitorous apprentice, (dis)organized by the top contestants.

 
 
 
Gsquared
Junior Principal
1.3.6  seeder  Gsquared  replied to  devangelical @1.3.5    one week ago

It may have been an effort by Rhodes to provide Trump "plausible deniability" for the putsch, even though it was an encrypted email.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
Professor Quiet
1.3.7  Ozzwald  replied to  devangelical @1.3.5    one week ago
he had to have plausible deniability

Has Trump ever had plausible anything?  He has always been the, believe what I tell you, not what you see with your own eyes, type of guy.

z9a4qkehw3c11.png

 
 
 
gooseisback
Freshman Silent
1.3.8  gooseisback  replied to  devangelical @1.3.5    one week ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Expert
1.4  Tacos!  replied to  Gsquared @1    one week ago
For the right-wingers who keep bellowing about no seditious conspiracy charges, here they are.

Technically, I think people have demanding “insurrection” charges. Insurrection is how they keep describing January 6. So that complaint probably still stands.

Sedition is technically a different crime, although they are very closely related. To oversimplify, Sedition is basically inciting someone to commit Insurrection. Sedition is the speech; Insurrection is the act.

Although I think we should be careful not to get too hung up on the word “incitement” because under Brandenburg that has to be an “imminent” act of violence. But I don’t think Sedition is handled the same way. Sedition seems to also cover long-term planning. Like I think the guys who planned the bombing of the World Trade Center were convicted of Sedition.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
1.4.1  Split Personality  replied to  Tacos! @1.4    one week ago
Similar to insurrection , the act of sedition is also a crime under the US Code, which characterizes it as two or more people who conspire to overthrow the US government, or "prevent, hinder, or delay the execution" of US law by force. It's punishable by a fine and up to 20 years in prison. Here's what 'insurrection,' 'coup' and 'sedition' mean - CNNPolitics

This seems more correctly applied to these conspirators.

Insurrection would be the next level of organization, violence with firearms and the ability to hold a facility hostage

and uniformed police and military support ala a mutiny.  None of that happened.

 
 
 
Gsquared
Junior Principal
1.4.2  seeder  Gsquared  replied to  Tacos! @1.4    one week ago
Technically, I think people have demanding “insurrection” charges.

You're probably right about that.  

This is the Federal Code in regards to insurrection:

"Whoever incites, sets on foot, assists, or engages in any rebellion or insurrection against the authority of the United States or the laws thereof, or gives aid or comfort thereto, shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than ten years, or both; and shall be incapable of holding any office under the United States."   18 U.S. Code § 2383

 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Expert
1.4.3  Tacos!  replied to  Gsquared @1.4.2    one week ago

You have to love the circular definition. The crime of insurrection is defined as being involved in an insurrection. Great. Very helpful.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
1.4.4  Split Personality  replied to  Tacos! @1.4.3    one week ago

but potentially 20 years for sedition, only 10 for insurrection.

 
 
 
Gsquared
Junior Principal
1.4.5  seeder  Gsquared  replied to  Tacos! @1.4.3    one week ago

It is what it is.  (The ultimate circular response.)

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Junior Quiet
1.5  Jack_TX  replied to  Gsquared @1    one week ago
Interestingly, though, the alleged statement by Rhodes seems to exonerate Trump from the Oath Keepers' conspiracy.  I wonder...

I noticed that.  Interesting indeed.

 
 
 
Gsquared
Junior Principal
1.5.1  seeder  Gsquared  replied to  Jack_TX @1.5    one week ago

There is a lot still to be learned, or, at least, revealed to the public, since the DOJ undoubtedly knows much more than has been released so far.

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Junior Quiet
1.5.2  Jack_TX  replied to  Gsquared @1.5.1    one week ago
the DOJ undoubtedly knows much more than has been released so far.

Well one would hope that's always the case.   Investigations aren't supposed to be spectator events.

 
 
 
Gsquared
Junior Principal
1.5.3  seeder  Gsquared  replied to  Jack_TX @1.5.2    one week ago

Very true.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
2  Kavika     one week ago

Excellent.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
2.1  devangelical  replied to  Kavika @2    one week ago

hopefully the DOJ will fuck those domestic terrorists up permanently.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
3  devangelical    one week ago

oh look, it's the TDS poster boy. he appears to have gotten a bit over zealous at his last meeting with trump though.

_v=63f541642105159

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
3.1  Texan1211  replied to  devangelical @3    one week ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
3.2  JohnRussell  replied to  devangelical @3    one week ago

He poked himself in the eye with a fork while eating soup. 

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
3.2.1  devangelical  replied to  JohnRussell @3.2    one week ago

looks like he caught a mushroom dick in the eye...

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
3.3  Split Personality  replied to  devangelical @3    one week ago
What do you do if you get semen in your eye?
What do you do now? Getting semen in your eye typically isn’t harmful, but it can hurt like hell. If your first step is to freak out, that’s totally understandable. Getting semen in your eye can sting and burn in a way that might make you scared of serious damage. Don’t panic.
 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Guide
4  Greg Jones    one week ago

Now all they have to do is convict, using due process and the presumption of innocence.

 
 
 
JBB
Professor Principal
5  JBB    one week ago

There goes claim of nobody charged with sedition...

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
Professor Guide
6  Paula Bartholomew    one week ago

What ever puts these human pos's behind bars for a very long time works for me.  If they have to pull a Capone to accomplish it, then by all means do it.

 
 

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