Cherokee Fry Bread

  
By:  Raven Wing  •  6 months ago  •  10 comments


Cherokee Fry Bread
 

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THE NEWSTALKERS COOKBOOK

Ingredients:

3 cups all-purpose flour

4 teaspoons baking soda

1/2 teaspoon of salt

1 large egg – well beaten

1-1/3 cups warm water

A deep skillet or stewing pot for frying the bread

Use enough shortening for frying. DO NOT USE OIL. Make sure there is at least 2-1/2 - 3 inches of liquid for deep frying. You may need to add more as the bread fries up, depending on how much you make.

Procedure:

Combine the flour, baking soda and salt and mix well.  

Add the egg and water and mix well, then gently knead the dough until it is smooth and tacky, but, not more than a few minutes or the dough will be tough and won’t rise well.  

Then roll the dough out on a lightly floured board or smooth surface until approx. 1/4" thick, and in a rectangular shape.

Cut the dough into 2” x 3” pieces and cut about a ½ inch slit in the middle with a sharp knife. This allows the bread to puff up around the slit when frying.  Be careful not to stretch the dough when lifting to put into the hot oil.

Or…as an alternative, you can pull off pieces of the dough and roll into rounds about the size of a small saucer. Then fry as usual. This will give you a nice size piece of round Fry Bread.

Frying:

Heat 2-1/2 – 3 inches of shortening in a deep skillet or large stew pot. 

Turn the bread when edges are brown, and brown on both sides.  Fry the bread until they are puffed.Do Not overcook or bread will be tough.

Lay fried bread pieces on a couple of paper towels to drain when removed from pan

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Alternatives:

Add a 1/8 tablespoon of garlic powder, not garlic salt, to the recipe for a nice garlic bread flavor

Or dust stop of bread with a bit of fine grated Parmesan cheese as soon as the bread is removed from the pan for extra flavor.

Experiment using your own ideas for toppings or flavor enhancers.  You can also dust the fry bread with powdered sugar while still hot to make a tasty desert.


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Raven Wing
1  author  Raven Wing    6 months ago

Fry Bread has been a staple food item for the Cherokee people, and for many other Native Americans, for thousands of years. Some of the ingredients varied depending on where they were living at the time as they migrated throughout America. Once the Tribes settled in their respective homelands they used the ingredients they could grow or find in their area.

I learned how to make the Cherokee Fry Bread from my Great-Grandmother, who learned it from her Mother. Over the years the Fry Bread was taught from one generation to the next and there was no recipe. So I decided to write the recipe with the help of my Grandmother. 

Fry Bread may vary from different Tribes, but, no matter what ingredients are used, Fry Bread is still one of their staple foods. 

You can experiment with the alternative toppings and uses and find new ways to use the Fry Bread. 

 
 
 
dave-2693993
2  dave-2693993    6 months ago

Looks delicious Raven Wing.

Thank you.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
2.1  author  Raven Wing  replied to  dave-2693993 @2    6 months ago

You're welcome Dave. Fry Bread goes good with just about any kind of food. Soups, stews, salads, etc. Anything you might eat bread with, other than sandwiches. And the round Fry Bread can be used for sandwiches as well. Peanut butter and jelly go great with with the round ones.

 
 
 
Kathleen
2.2  Kathleen  replied to  dave-2693993 @2    6 months ago

It sure does...

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
3  sandy-2021492    6 months ago

Thanks, Raven.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
3.1  author  Raven Wing  replied to  sandy-2021492 @3    6 months ago

You're welcome, Sandy. (smile)

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
4  Trout Giggles    6 months ago

Raven, why do you say do not use oil and then have this:

Heat 2-1/2 – 3 inches of oil or shortening in a deep skillet or large stew pot.

I myself prefer Crisco over oil any day of the week, but why avoid oil for making fry bread? Does it soak into the bread and make it greasy?

Mr Giggles makes these sometimes when he makes green chili. He calls them something else (not sopapillas.....) Anyway, I love 'em when they are fresh out of the skillet.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
4.1  author  Raven Wing  replied to  Trout Giggles @4    6 months ago
Raven, why do you say do not use oil and then have this:

The difference between oil and shortening is that oil tends to get a rather burnt taste after a while at high temps that is needed for quick frying. Also, oil tends to make the fry bread soggy after frying. 

I put the oil in by accident and I will remove it from the recipe. Thanks for pointing it out so I can correct it and not create confusion. jrSmiley_79_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
4.1.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Raven Wing @4.1    6 months ago
oil tends to make the fry bread soggy after frying. 

thought so

I put the oil in by accident and I will remove it from the recipe. Thanks for pointing it out so I can correct it and not create confusion.

jrSmiley_15_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Raven Wing
4.2  author  Raven Wing  replied to  Trout Giggles @4    6 months ago
Mr Giggles makes these sometimes when he makes green chili. He calls them something else (not sopapillas.....) Anyway, I love 'em when they are fresh out of the skillet.

There are many who have different names for this type of fried bread, both Native American and non-Native American. 

 
 
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