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What's the Difference Between Being Transgender and Transsexual?

  
Via:  CB  •  2 years ago  •  12 comments

By:   Mere Abrams (Healthline)

What's the Difference Between Being Transgender and Transsexual?
Transgender is an umbrella term that describes those who have a gender that's different from the sex assigned at birth. Transsexual is a more specific term that fits under this umbrella, but it shouldn't be used unless someone specifically asks to be referred to this way. Here's what you need to know.

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Definitions! These can clarify some of the misunderstanding about Trans-people. I admit I have not been closely 'following' the changes and increases in terms either.

After reading through this article, will you be better informed? Time will tell.


S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


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The word "transgender" is an umbrella term that describes those who have a gender that's different from the sex assigned at birth: male, female, or intersex.

"Transsexual" is a more specific term that fits under the transgender umbrella. This word can be contentious and shouldn't be used unless someone specifically asks to be referred to this way.

What exactly does it mean to be transgender?


The term transgender can mean different things to different people. There are a number of other labels individuals who are transgender use to describe their gender.

This can be confusing at first, particularly if you or someone you know think they might be transgender.

For example, a person who was assigned a female sex at birth and has a male sense of self could be categorized as transgender.

A person who was assigned male at birth and has a female sense of self could also be categorized as transgender.


Sometimes, those who are transgender use the abbreviated term "trans" to convey the idea that the sex they were assigned at birth doesn't fully and accurately reflect their core sense of self or internal experience of gender.

Those who are transgender can identify as a woman, man, a combination of both, or something else altogether.

The word transgender can also be used in conjunction with other labels to indicate the gender or sex someone knows themselves to be.

For example, someone can identify as a transgender man, a transgender woman, or a transgender nonbinary person.

Nonbinary is an umbrella term that describes those who have a gender that can't be exclusively categorized as male or female.


As a rule of thumb, the term transgender provides information about the extent to which someone identifies with the sex they were assigned at birth.
The following word often communicates important information about the way someone experiences and understands gender, as well as how they might want to be referred to.


For example, a transgender male is someone who doesn't identify with the sex assigned at birth and has a sense of self that's male.

Some transgender people change their appearance, body, name, or legal gender marker to convey and affirm their internal experience of gender. Others don't feel the need to make these changes to express and validate this aspect of who they are. Either way is OK.

What exactly does it mean to be transsexual?


Historically and medically, the term transsexual was used to indicate a difference between one's gender identity (their internal experience of gender) and sex assigned at birth (male, female, or intersex).

More specifically, the term is often (though not always) used to communicate that one's experience of gender involves medical changes, such as hormones or surgery, that help alter their anatomy and appearance to more closely align with their gender identity.


Similar to the word transgender, the meaning of the word transsexual can vary from person to person, culture to culture, and across history.

Despite their similar definitions, many transgender people don't identify as transsexual.

Transsexual isn't an umbrella term. It should never be used to refer to the entire transgender community.

It's important to remember that the term transsexual doesn't include or reflect the experience of many who are a part of the transgender community. Therefore, it shouldn't be used to refer to someone — unless they specifically assert that preference.

Further, some transgender people find the word transsexual to be offensive and stigmatizing. This is because of its history and roots in the professional fields of medicine and psychology, which used this term to incorrectly label all transgender people as mentally ill or sexually deviant.

Professionals in medicine and mental health now understand that having a transgender or transsexual gender identity isn't a mental illness, and that transgender identities are a naturally occurring part of human gender diversity and gender experiences.

It sounds like you just said the same thing twice — what's the difference?


The main difference between the word transgender and the word transsexual has to do with the way it's used and experienced.

Many transgender people report having negative associations with the word transsexual.

Current best practices in transgender health still use the word transsexual, but acknowledge that it's no longer the most inclusive and affirming term to describe someone who has a gender that's different from the sex assigned at birth.

Transgender or trans are now the generally accepted and promoted terms that Western societies use to describe those who have a gender that's different from the sex assigned at birth.


Transgender tends to be more inclusive and affirming than transsexual because it includes the experience of those who pursue medical changes to affirm gender as well as those who do not.

While some transgender and transsexual advocates have argued that the word transsexual doesn't always have to include medical changes, this notion hasn't yet been widely accepted by the larger transgender community.

Generally, the word transgender recognizes the need to medically alter one's body, hormonal makeup, or appearance isn't required for everyone who identifies with a gender that's different from the sex assigned at birth.

The decision to pursue physical and medical changes can vary from transgender person to transgender person.

Why is the term transsexual so contentious?


The term transsexual can be contentious because it was historically used to categorize transgender people as mentally ill. It often served as justification for discrimination, harassment, and mistreatment.

This term is heavily debated both within the transgender community and outside of it.

Some people feel it's necessary and important to have a medical diagnosis or surgery to validate one's transgender experience.

Others feel a medical or mental health diagnosis and requirement for intervention only perpetuate the inaccurate assumption that transgender people have an inherent medical or mental health problem.


In the past, transsexualism, transvestism, and gender identity disorder were the labels used to medically and psychologically categorize someone who has a gender or appearance that differs from the sex assigned at birth.

Current medical and psychological guidelines have moved away from using these terms to convey the idea that being transgender or transsexual, in and of itself, isn't a mental illness or medical problem.

More accurately, it's the lack of access, acceptance, and understanding of gender diversity that contributes to the mental health issues many transgender people face.

Gender dysphoria is the current diagnosis used to describe the distress an individual may experience as a result of having a gender that's different from the sex assigned at birth.

If it has this history, why do some people refer to themselves in this way?


Despite this history, some in Western countries and other cultures across the globe continue to use the word transsexual to refer to themselves and the experience of having a gender that's different from the sex assigned at birth.

Many who use the word transsexual to describe their gender see a medical diagnosis, medical transition using hormones, and gender confirmation surgery as important parts of their experience. They use the term to help communicate that viewpoint.


Remember that the negative connotations of the word transsexual vary from person to person and culture to culture.

If a particular culture, community, or individual experiences and uses the word transsexual as a respectful and authentic descriptor, then it can be used in that particular situation or context.

. . . .

How do you know which term(s) you should use to refer to someone?


The best way to determine which term you should use to refer to someone is to ask them.

If you're unsure, asking the person is always the best option.

The word someone uses to describe their gender can be a private and sensitive topic. Many people don't share that information publicly or with strangers.


It isn't always necessary to know or agree with how someone identifies their gender in order to interact with them respectfully.

If you're in a situation where asking isn't possible or doesn't feel appropriate, the next best option is to ask someone else — who ideally knows the person — if they know how the person in question likes to be referred to.

If you need to refer to someone but don't know their gender or pronoun, it's best to avoid gendered language and use the person's name instead.

Where can I learn more?


If you want to learn more about gender labels such as transgender and transsexual, check out these articles:

  • What Does the Word Transgender Mean?
  • Transvestite, Transsexual, Transgender: Here's What You Should Actually Call Trans People

And check out these resources:

  • GLAAD's glossary of transgender terms
  • TSER's list of LGBTQ+ definitions
  • Planned Parenthood's guide to trans and gender nonconforming identities

Education about different gender labels can be an important part of exploration, self-discovery, and supporting loved ones. Each person deserves the right to determine the label that's used to describe them.

Mere Abrams is a researcher, writer, educator, consultant, and licensed clinical social worker who reaches a worldwide audience through public speaking, publications, social media (@meretheir), and gender therapy and support services practice onlinegendercare.com. Mere uses their personal experience and diverse professional background to support individuals exploring gender and help institutions, organizations, and businesses to increase gender literacy and identify opportunities to demonstrate gender inclusion in products, services, programs, projects, and content.


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CB
Professor Principal
1  seeder  CB    2 years ago

Let's get some term clarification out and about, please.  It may be this can help!  Just in case you wonder!

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
2  seeder  CB    2 years ago

Well, since this ridiculous 2022 election is ALMOST over let's move on to getting some understanding on what a transperson, transgender, and transsexual are!

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
4  seeder  CB    2 years ago

Netflix Series: INNOCENCE  Bangkok Love Stories

Is full of sexual diversity: transgender, transsexual, homosexual, and heterosexual. The 13 episodes are a study in relationship-making "Thai-style."

On Netflix, I am discovering how much I enjoy the sounds and interplay between Asian peoples across the board. Asians in their cultural setting are really sweet peoples with a 'frank and direct' way of speaking and dealing with each other.  By now, I have watched (and read the captioning) on a wide-span of foreign movies and its eye-opening as well as 'touching.'

I don't know if anyone else on NT has invested the time to get through these types of foreign shows, but it's really, really, . . . good storytelling.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
5  seeder  CB    2 years ago

Neil deGrasse Tyson's Thoughts on Transgenderism

Ben Shapiro

Video discussion between conservative Ben Shapiro and Neil deGrasse Tyson on transgenderism.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
6  seeder  CB    2 years ago

Thought Exercise: Can a transgender person get EQUAL PAY (women)?

 
 
 
pat wilson
Professor Participates
7  pat wilson    2 years ago

I'm thoroughly confused about these terms. The author defines transgender and then further down the article defines transsexual and its the same as the definition given for transgender. SMH.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
7.1  seeder  CB  replied to  pat wilson @7    2 years ago

Thank you for your participation and question. I am no expert on this, but it appears to be stating transgender is an overarching term used by Some in the 'community,' as a catch-all whereas transsexual is only used by those who DEFINITELY have gone through physical modification/s of some kind or "all" relevant features. That is,

the term transgender provides information about the extent to which someone identifies with the sex they were assigned at birth.  Many who use the word transsexual to describe their gender see a medical diagnosis, medical transition using hormones, and gender confirmation surgery as important parts of their experience. They use the term to help communicate that viewpoint.

To put it in layman's terms, I would think of someone transgender is moving back and forth (in their 'head' and appearance) about  their gender and dressing and acting more or less accordingly.

Where as a transsexual has 'strongest' desires to be an embodiment of the sex they were not born into, but desperately want to be dress, fit in, and 'live' life.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
8  seeder  CB    2 years ago
The Birdcage - The Best Of Albert Goldman

Okay, this is Transgenderism, in my opinion.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
9  seeder  CB    2 years ago

THE DANISH GIRL

- Official Trailer -

In Theaters November 2015

Okay, this is transsexualism, in my opinion.

 
 
 
CB
Professor Principal
10  seeder  CB    2 years ago

Okay, "Darren" the character in Netflix's Heartbreak High is a "Gen-X" non-binary character. "He" says so in the series.

NOTE: I watch a lot of 'material' to be informed about the world around me. (Don't judge me, Drakk!)  :) :)

Quinni and Darren Scenepack (Heartbreak High)


 
 

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