New Orleans takes down third Confederate monument

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New Orleans takes down third Confederate monument

Fox News, Published May 17, 2017

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New Orleans removes third Confederate statue

Workers in New Orleans removed a third Confederate monument from the city early Wednesday.

The statue of Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard on his horse was lifted off its base shortly after 3 a.m., Fox 8 reported.

Many historians have considered Beauregard the first notable general of the Confederate Army during the Civil War.

This was the third Confederate-era memorial the city has removed; officials have pledged to take down a monument of Robert E. Lee as well. The city has not given a time frame for Lee’s removal due to “intimidation, threats, and violence, serious safety concerns remain.”

“Today we take another step in defining our city not by our past but by our bright future,” New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu said in a news release. “While we must honor our history, we will not allow the Confederacy to be put on a pedestal in the heart of New Orleans.”

Landrieu called for the memorials to be removed following the emotional aftermath of the Charleston church shootings. Dylann Roof, an avowed racist, shot and killed nine black parishioners at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Shortly after the massacre, a website Roof made was discovered. The website contained pictures of the killer posing with the Confederate battle flag in photos, recharging the debate over whether Confederate emblems represent racism or an honorable heritage.

The City Council voted 6-1 in 2015 to remove the monuments after a succession of contentious public meetings where impassioned monument supporters and opponents heckled each other. Contractors involved in the removal process were threatened and the work stalled for months as monument supporters looked to the courts for help.

Monument workers covered their faces and wore bulletproof vests and helmets for safety while removing the first two memorials of The White Rebellion and Jefferson Davis. On Wednesday, the workers still wore helmets and covered their face during the removal process but the scene was more subdued.

Last month, during the removal of The White Rebellion, police arrested multiple protesters who were charged with disturbing the peace after a scuffle occurred at an event celebrating the removal of the memorial.

Local media displayed images of monument supporters waving Confederate battle flags while the opponents stood nearby peacefully.

“Mayor Landrieu’s actions are an insult to New Orleanians who came before us-the veterans widows, parents, children and citizens-who donated their personal money to build and place these monuments where they stand to honor the memory of their fallen family members,” said Pierre McGraw, President of the Monument Task Committee which has been advocating to keep the monuments.

But for many in this majority black city, the monuments represent a shameful part of the city and country’s history, and pay honor to a history of slavery and segregation.

The statues may be placed in a museum or another site at some point, “where they can be placed in their proper historical context from a dark period of American history,” city spokesman Tyronne Walker said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Buzz of the Orient
link   Buzz of the Orient    4 months ago

It's hard for me not to be amused that there are people who think that if you hide the markers of your history they will no longer matter.  I can understand it if it is a statue or monument to Adolf Hitler, but really, who can liken Beauregard or Lee to Hitler, as being so infamous that you are ashamed of them?

Canada also had a war similar in some ways to the American Civil War. It was the English vs the French, a battle was fought in the Plains of Abraham, and the British won.

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"The Plains of Abraham changed the course of Canadian history in 1759. Today, you can walk in the footsteps of history where two cultures collided to create one country. On Sept. 13, 1759, two armies - the French led by General Montcalm and the British commanded by General Wolfe - faced off in a bloody battle here."

There are statues of General Montcalm in Canada, and there is absolutely no desire on the part of any Canadians to hide any glorification by monument or statue or otherwise of Montcalm or any other historical marker celebrating the losing side of the battle.

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Statue of General Montcalm in Quebec, you will note that it is NOT defaced.

 
jwc2blue
link   jwc2blue  replied to  Buzz of the Orient   4 months ago

It's hard for me not to be amused that there are people who think that if you hide the markers of your history they will no longer matter.  I can understand it if it is a statue or monument to Adolf Hitler, but really, who can liken Beauregard or Lee to Hitler, as being so infamous that you are ashamed of them?

Some people are easily amused. You are making an assumption. Of course, you know what happens when you assume.

Nobody thinks that taking down the monuments to the slavers erases the fact that they existed any more than one would believe that not having monuments to Hitler or his bunch would ever make the Jews forget. Comment removed for skirting the CoC [ph]

History will not forget the stain of slavery, but we should not revere those who fought for it either.

The Pyramids and other statues in Egypt still remain - nobody is taking them down.  

The Egyptians of that time were not just from a different era, it was a different epoch. The pyramids were burial sites. They don't bear plaques commemorating their inhabitants. The comparison is asinine.

 
Buzz of the Orient
link   Buzz of the Orient  replied to  jwc2blue   4 months ago

As usual, it is extremely difficult if not impossible for you to refute what another member says without insulting them.  Your ad hominem remarks should earn you more suspensions than you have already managed to obtain, in fact I truly doubt you would be missed here if you insulted enough members to get yourself banned.

As you can see, 1ofmany is capable of debating with a valid point without insulting anyone, but unfortunately for you, you're unable to do that.

 
JohnRussell
link   JohnRussell  replied to  Buzz of the Orient   4 months ago

Buzz, why did you seed this article? As far as I can see, you don't have a valid point to make. You want to compare the US Civil War, which was fought over the disposition of race based slavery, to a war fought in Canada by two absentee European powers, then you say no one should be "ashamed" of confederate generals who were , not coincidentally,  slave owners themselves.  The Confederacy was a BAD IDEA, the world's first avowed white supremacist nation. There is no reasonable defense for it. 

 
Buzz of the Orient
link   Buzz of the Orient  replied to  JohnRussell   4 months ago

If any of us don't bother to seed articles that elicit debate and concern, this whole NT site would languish and fade. As you can see it elicited discussion and different views. In fact, when those views differed from mine, I LEARNED FROM THEM. When I post something totally innocuous, such as a photo essay, or an article about the movies, or about Canada, almost nobody even looks at them let alone comments.  Have I criticized you for posting articles damning Trump? (If I have remarked about that it was only in reply to your criticisms of my postings.) As you know, those anti-Trump articles bring about lots of action, on both sides of the issue.

Just to let you know, and provide you with some satisfaction, some of the Trump things that are happening these days are moving me away my attempts to encourage fair comment rather than pure bias.

 
JohnRussell
link   JohnRussell  replied to  Buzz of the Orient   4 months ago

OK Buzz, fair enough. 

 
Aeonpax
link   Aeonpax    4 months ago

We have a public statue of a great American up where I live; Vince Lombardi.

 
JohnRussell
link   JohnRussell    4 months ago

 I can understand it if it is a statue or monument to Adolf Hitler, but really, who can liken Beauregard or Lee to Hitler, as being so infamous that you are ashamed of them?

 

Why do you think people might be "ashamed" of Lee or other Confederate figures? 

 
Buzz of the Orient
link   Buzz of the Orient  replied to  JohnRussell   4 months ago

Because they are taking down statues of them, and hiding them in museums or in storage. Because they aren't symbolic of the ultra-PC that the local residents feel is obligatory.

 
JohnRussell
link   JohnRussell  replied to  Buzz of the Orient   4 months ago

Do they have any public statues in Israel dedicated to people who once helped to enslave them? 

 
Buzz of the Orient
link   Buzz of the Orient  replied to  JohnRussell   4 months ago

The Pyramids and other statues in Egypt still remain - nobody is taking them down.  Israel is a different country so there is no relevance to the issue in your question. As it is Jews world wide remember the Egyptian slavery every year at their Passover Seders. 

 
JohnRussell
link   JohnRussell  replied to  Buzz of the Orient   4 months ago

There is relevance, New Orleans is a majority black city. 

 
Buzz of the Orient
link   Buzz of the Orient  replied to  JohnRussell   4 months ago
Then the whites are a minority. I thought you steadfastly defended the rights of minorities.
 
Dean Moriarty
link   Dean Moriarty    4 months ago

Won't be long before the liberals will be calling to take down our tenth mountain division ski trooper statue because he is too white.

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JohnRussell
link   JohnRussell  replied to  Dean Moriarty   4 months ago

We see a lot of dumb comments on NT. The one just made above is near the top of the list. 

 
1ofmany
link   1ofmany    4 months ago

These civil war statues were put up long after the civil war ended to symbolize white resistance to desegregation. Although the statutes may being back fond memories for the descendants of the white supremacists who fought to maintain slavery, they are an insult to the dessendants of those they enslaved. Putting them in a museum is kind. They should be melted down and recast as outdoor toilets for the homeless. 

 

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