Second Trump Ghostwriter Says He Was Lousy at Business, Bored, and Obsessed With Carpet Swatches

  
Via:  tessylo  •  2 weeks ago  •  12 comments

Second Trump Ghostwriter Says He Was Lousy at Business, Bored, and Obsessed With Carpet Swatches

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Second Trump Ghostwriter Says He Was Lousy at Business, Bored, and Obsessed With Carpet Swatches



a76e9ca0-ba9f-11e7-afbd-e700b0f36d78_dai By jamie.ross@thedailybeast.com (Jamie Ross),The Daily Beast 21 hours ago 






833e6e1077668c9ad3be169ec8b81b08
Reuters / Joshua Roberts

Two of Donald Trump's ghostwriters seem to be wracked with guilt about the fictional character they helped create that would go on to be president.

Tony Schwartz, who helped Trump write The Art of the Deal, has been a public critic for years. But a second ghostwriter has now come forward to spill the secrets of the Trump boardroom.

Financial records reported by The New York Times this week exposed the real Trump of the late '80s and early '90s—a reckless, failing businessman who lost more than $1 billion over a 10 years period.

At the same time as his failures, two book published under Trump's name—Surviving at the Top published in 1990 and The Art of the Deal in 1987—helped the future president create the utter illusion that he was one of the country's leading businessmen, boosting his national platform and setting him on the path to stardom in The Apprentice.

Now, in the wake of the Times report, the men who ghost wrote those books both feel complicit in the trick. Tony Schwartz, who helped Trump write The Art of the Deal, disowned the work, saying, “Given the Times report on Trump's staggering losses, I’d be fine if Random House simply took the book out of print. Or recategorized it as fiction.”

Charles Leerhsen, ghostwriter of Surviving at the Top, has written an account for Yahoo News about the time he spent observing Trump for the book. He paints a picture of a lazy, ill-tempered man who was out of his depth when it came to business. In fact, his main contribution to his businesses seemed to be choosing carpets.

Leerhsen wrote that Trump was neither terrified about the scale of his losses nor, as the president claimed Wednesday, carrying out a Machiavellian plan to make sure he didn’t have to pay income tax. He was just bored.


“Trump’s portfolio did not jibe with what I saw each day—which to a surprisingly large extent was him looking at fabric swatches,” said the ghostwriter. “Indeed, flipping through fabric swatches seemed at times to be his main occupation. Some days he would do it for hours, then take me in what he always called his ‘French military helicopter’ to Atlantic City—where he looked at more fabric swatches.”

According to Leerhsen, Trump's obsession with carpets and curtains appeared to stem from his lack of understanding of much more important business decisions. The writer recounted one decision Trump reportedly made that exposed his complete lack of ability as a businessman.

“One of his aides once told me that every room at the Plaza could be filled at the ‘rack rate’ (list price) every night and the revenue still wouldn’t cover the monthly payment of the loan he’d taken out to buy the place,” said Leerhsen. “In other words, he’d made a ridiculous deal. Neither he nor the banks had done the math beforehand.”

Not only does Leerhsen’s account of Trump make him sound incompetent, but also a compulsive liar and an angry man. He reportedly insisted Leerhsen include an “obviously made up” story in the book about how he was walking down the street and saw a completely naked woman.

Another story exposes his short temper and poor treatment of staff. Leerhsen recounted overhearing one side of a phone call between Trump and a low-level employee working as a receptionist. Trump was “purple with rage” and demanded to know why it took so long to answer the phone. “After bawling her out for a minute or two, he hung up abruptly, forgetting why he had called in the first place,” wrote the ghostwriter.

Summing up his time with Trump, Leerhsen wrote: “Except for an occasional passing look of queasiness, or anger, when someone came into his Trump Tower office and whispered the daily win/loss numbers at his Atlantic City casinos, he seemed to be bored out of his mind.”

Read more at The Daily Beast.



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Tessylo
1  seeder  Tessylo    2 weeks ago

Charles Leerhsen, ghostwriter of Surviving at the Top, has written an account for Yahoo News about the time he spent observing Trump for the book. He paints a picture of a lazy, ill-tempered man who was out of his depth when it came to business. In fact, his main contribution to his businesses seemed to be choosing carpets.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
1.1  Greg Jones  replied to  Tessylo @1    2 weeks ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
luther28
2  luther28    2 weeks ago

I wish he had stuck with carpet swatches, one of the keys to success is to know ones own limitations.

 
 
 
The Magic Eight Ball
3  The Magic Eight Ball    2 weeks ago
He Was Lousy At Business, 

but yet those who would judge him could never do better.

comparable to piss ants judging kings.

I only wish I could lose a billion dollars and still have the kind of boredom and money to piss away my time like that.

 
 
 
katrix
3.1  katrix  replied to  The Magic Eight Ball @3    2 weeks ago
but yet those who would judge him could never do better

Want to bet?  Almost any member of this site could have done better.  Hell, if he had just invested the money his daddy gave him, he'd have been better off financially than he is now. 

It's hilarious that you compare him to a king, though - it explains why you don't think he should be held accountable for anything or held to any ethical standards.  Although I think he prefers the term emperor.

Deranged Donald is a loser.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
3.1.1  Greg Jones  replied to  katrix @3.1    2 weeks ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
luther28
3.1.2  luther28  replied to  Greg Jones @3.1.1    2 weeks ago
Trump wins so often he gets bored with it

Losing one billion dollars in a ten year span is considered winning?

Not a member of the left, so perhaps it is lost in  translation.

 
 
 
katrix
3.1.3  katrix  replied to  Greg Jones @3.1.1    2 weeks ago
Trump wins so often he gets bored with it.

That is the funniest thing I've read all day.  Keep drinking the Breitbart koolaid, it's amusing.

 
 
 
Tessylo
4  seeder  Tessylo    2 weeks ago

'It's hilarious that you compare him to a king, though - it explains why you don't think he should be held accountable for anything or held to any ethical standards.  Although I think he prefers the term emperor.'

My thoughts exactly.  

 
 
 
bbl-1
5  bbl-1    2 weeks ago

Does not matter.  Mexico will not pay for the wall.  And...………."I'm like a really smart guy," uttered by the Trump can not be refuted.

Besides, the Trump also recently said he, ( paraphrase ) "Don't know much about WikiLeaks."

"Shoot em'"------------And "Lock her up," the utterances of the 'daisy chain' gang.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
5.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  bbl-1 @5    2 weeks ago
"Don't know much about WikiLeaks."

"I love WikiLeaks" - Donald J. Trump, Sr, October 2016

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
6  Trout Giggles    2 weeks ago
“One of his aides once told me that every room at the Plaza could be filled at the ‘rack rate’ (list price) every night and the revenue still wouldn’t cover the monthly payment of the loan he’d taken out to buy the place,” said Leerhsen. “In other words, he’d made a ridiculous deal. Neither he nor the banks had done the math beforehand.”

There's something here that strikes me as odd. Why would a successful bank loan him money for a loser deal? Didn't anybody pick up a calculator and determine the profit-loss potential? Does anybody think that there was a lot more going on with this deal than just a bad loan?

 
 
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