Green Bank Telescope detects most massive neutron star ever observed

  
Via:  sandy-2021492  •  one month ago  •  12 comments

Green Bank Telescope detects most massive neutron star ever observed

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T




A neutron star with 2.17 times the mass of our Sun crammed into a sphere 18.6 miles across has been observed 4,600 light years from Earth by astronomers using the Green Bank Telescope in Pocahontas County.



The high-density neutron star is the most massive ever detected, and approaches the theoretical maximum mass possible for a neutron star, according to the researchers who discovered it.


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sandy-2021492
1  seeder  sandy-2021492    one month ago
“Neutron stars are as mysterious as they are fascinating,” said Thankful Cromartie, a graduate student at the University of Virginia, a pre-doctoral fellow at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Charlottesville and the principal author of the paper. “These city-sized objects are essentially ginormous atomic nuclei. They are so massive that their interiors take on weird properties. Finding the maximum mass that physics and nature will allow can teach us a great deal about this otherwise inaccessible realm in astrophysics.”
 
 
 
MUVA
1.1  MUVA  replied to  sandy-2021492 @1    one month ago

Sandy I go to that telescope every time  someone new goes snowboarding with us  it is very cool have been on the tour half a dozen times.

this looking out the front door at our condo.

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sandy-2021492
1.1.1  seeder  sandy-2021492  replied to  MUVA @1.1    one month ago

I've only been on the tour once, when I was a kid.  I should go again some weekend.

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
1.1.2  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  MUVA @1.1    one month ago

Just seeing that picture makes me jones for my snow sculpting days.  I could so totally create you a masterpiece just outside of your own door.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
1.1.3  Trout Giggles  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @1.1.2    one month ago

I never jones for snow anymore. Saw way too much of growing up.

 
 
 
Enoch
1.2  Enoch  replied to  sandy-2021492 @1    one month ago

Dear Friend Sandy: Fascinating.

Thanks for posting.

Please inform us on such topics.

We are the better off for knowing them.

We can never know too much about our universe.

Who is to say where such findings can be helpful?

P&AB.

Enoch.

 
 
 
charger 383
2  charger 383    one month ago

I have been by there several times going to Cass Railroad

 
 
 
MrFrost
3  MrFrost    one month ago
A neutron star with 2.17 times the mass of our Sun crammed into a sphere 18.6 miles across

Crikey, that's some REALLY dense material. 

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
3.1  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  MrFrost @3    one month ago

It must be scary beautiful.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
3.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  MrFrost @3    one month ago
A neutron star with 2.17 times the mass of our Sun crammed into a sphere 18.6 miles acros

I'm having a hard time wrapping my brain around that. That's a lot of potential energy. Good thing it's over 4,600 light years away

 
 
 
katrix
4  katrix    one month ago

My friend has a cabin in the mountains there - you can see the telescope when sitting out on the deck. It's a beautiful area and NO CELL PHONES!

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
4.1  seeder  sandy-2021492  replied to  katrix @4    one month ago

Or WiFi.

 
 
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