Donald Trump swaps his usual blonde hairstyle for his natural silver shade | Metro News

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  jbb  •  3 weeks ago  •  29 comments

By:   Jacob Geanous (Metro)

Donald Trump swaps his usual blonde hairstyle for his natural silver shade | Metro News
The 74-year-old president, who has sported fake tans and a perfectly coiffed hairstyle, had a noticeably gray head of hair at a briefing Tuesday.

Busted!


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Donald Trump was seen sporting a gray hairdo on Tuesday, contrasting heavily with his usual yellow locks (Picture: AP) Share this article via facebookShare this article via twitter

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Donald Trump has apparently ditched the hair dye and swapped his notoriously blonde hairdo for his natural silver shade.

The 74-year-old president, who has sported fake tans and a perfectly coiffed hairstyle for decades, had a noticeably gray head of hair at a briefing in the White House Rose Garden on Tuesday.

Trump turned his briefing into something that more resembled a campaign rally and went on a series of long rants against Joe Biden, China and Democrats. For a long portion of the briefing, he read directly off a list of Democratic political agendas, all of which he bashed.

However, many viewers appeared to be more enamored by Trump's hair than his speech.

'Just seen Trump at a press conference. Has someone toned him down? Not so orange and hair more silver than brassy blond,' one Twitter user wrote.


Trump blames Biden for the fact that the US hasnat been granted most favored nation status by the [checks notes] United States pic.twitter.com/OxvfC63GI9
— Aaron Rupar (@atrupar) July 15, 2020

Trump ranted about Biden, China and the Democrats, but his hair colour came in for scrutiny (Picture: PA)

'I realise that this is very trivial but has anyone noticed that Trump has stopped colouring his hair orange? Someone has told him that grey is more presidential,' wrote another.

'Has Trump ran out of his yellow hair dye due to lockdown,' a third said.

It is unclear what led to Trump's new silver locks, but it is believed that the style change was intentional as Trump has never been one to neglect his strictly-maintained image.

In a 2011 Rolling Stone interview, Trump explained his daily beauty regimen.

'Ok, what I do is, wash it with Head and Shoulders. I don't dry it, though. I let it dry by itself. It takes about an hour,' he said.

'…Ok, so I've done all that. I then comb my hair. Yes, I do use a comb. Do I comb it forward? I don't comb it forward. I actually don't have a bad hairline. When you think about it, it's not bad. I mean, I get a lot of credit for comb-overs.'

'But it's not really a comb-over. It's sort of a little bit forward and back. I've combed it the same way for years. Same thing, every time.'


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JBB
1  seeder  JBB    3 weeks ago

I had noticed and wondered why nobody else did...

 
 
 
dennis smith
1.1  dennis smith  replied to  JBB @1    3 weeks ago

So what? 

 
 
 
Gsquared
2  Gsquared    3 weeks ago

He changed wigs...

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
3  Paula Bartholomew    3 weeks ago

It is too late to re brand yourself now Trump.   You are the pig with the lipstick.

 
 
 
pat wilson
3.1  pat wilson  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @3    3 weeks ago
You are the pig with the lipstick.

And the Frisbee George Jetson hairdo.

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
3.1.1  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  pat wilson @3.1    3 weeks ago

The hairstyle is still hideous, but the gray does look way batter.  Trump can change his look all he wants, but it does not change what he is inside.  

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
4  Buzz of the Orient    3 weeks ago

A person's hair can turn white when they've been scared shitless. Maybe he knows he's going to go to jail for his crimes when his term is over, which is probably the number one reason why he wants so desperately to delay that by another four years. 

 
 
 
pat wilson
4.1  pat wilson  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @4    3 weeks ago

He'll pardon himself. Watch.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
4.1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  pat wilson @4.1    3 weeks ago

Can he pardon himself?   Can a person be pardoned if they have not yet been charged with an offence.  If he does get charged while still in office, then someone else posted his solution - near the end of his term, resign, have Pence assume the presidency to sign a pardon.

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
4.1.2  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @4.1.1    3 weeks ago

have Pence assume the presidency to sign a pardon.

That won't work unless Trump is found guilty of something.  Investigations/charges/trials, especially with numerous counts will take more time than his remaining 6 months.

 
 
 
cjcold
4.1.3  cjcold  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @4.1.2    3 weeks ago

And numerous jurisdictions.

 
 
 
Gsquared
4.1.4  Gsquared  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @4.1.2    3 weeks ago

That is not correct.  There does not have to be a conviction or even a formal charge.  Reference the Nixon example I discuss below.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
4.1.5  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @4.1.2    3 weeks ago

Justice delayed is justice denied.  

 
 
 
Gsquared
4.1.6  Gsquared  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @4.1.1    3 weeks ago
My comment 5 below was intended to be a reply to your questions here at 4.1.1.
 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
4.1.7  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Gsquared @4.1.6    3 weeks ago

And your comment below was quite enlightening, even though you felt it was not sufficiently complete. 

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
4.1.8  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Gsquared @4.1.4    3 weeks ago

I stand corrected then.  If Pence were to finish out this term and would pardon Trump, it will be a death knell for any future he might have in politics.

 
 
 
Gsquared
4.1.9  Gsquared  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @4.1.7    3 weeks ago

Thank you.  I feel it is incomplete because, as far as I know, there is really no precedent and, thus, there is no definitive answer.

As you should know, even if there is precedent, that precedent can be overturned.

Article II, Section 2 of the Constitution states, in pertinent part:  " The President ... shall have Power to grant Reprieves and Pardons for Offenses against the United States, except in Cases of  i mpeachment."   That does not give us a whole lot to go on.  A "strict" construction arguably could say he has the power.  In my opinion, logic and reason seems to militate otherwise.

 
 
 
Gsquared
4.1.10  Gsquared  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @4.1.8    3 weeks ago

I hope Pence has no future in politics already.  What a complete waste of space...

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
4.1.11  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Gsquared @4.1.10    3 weeks ago

I agree totally.

 
 
 
Gsquared
4.1.12  Gsquared  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @4.1.8    3 weeks ago

i didn't mean to be abrupt.  Apologies.

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
4.1.13  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  Gsquared @4.1.12    3 weeks ago

"No need to make hurtful retraction." (Demolition Man)

IOW, it is all good.jrSmiley_15_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
pat wilson
4.1.14  pat wilson  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @4.1.1    2 weeks ago

I think he can. I don't think it's ever been done but I think he can legally do it.

 
 
 
pat wilson
4.1.15  pat wilson  replied to  Paula Bartholomew @4.1.8    2 weeks ago

Two words, "Gerald Ford".

Pence doesn't care, he just wants an easy exit. He'll pardon trump if trump doesn't pardon himself. Don't know about the kids. Lol.

 
 
 
Gsquared
5  Gsquared    3 weeks ago

A person can be pardoned even if they have not been charged.  Witness the example of Richard Nixon, who was never formally charged with any crimes.  One of the first acts of Gerald Ford when he succeeded Nixon as President was to issue a pardon, which forever shielded Nixon from being charged with any federal crimes that he had potentially committed as of the time of issuance of the pardon.  Despite the pardon he received, Nixon was most certainly convicted in the court of public opinion.  If Trump resigns, or completes his term of office, his successor, whether it be Pence, or some later President, could pardon him whether he is formally charged, or convicted, or not.

Whether a President can pardon himself is an issue that, to my knowledge, has never been tested.  I am not a constitutional law scholar, but I guess that an argument could be advanced that the Office of the President can pardon the person who happens to occupy that office if there is no absolute identity between the two.  However, the idea that a President could pardon himself seems to me to be repugnant to our system of justice.  No man or woman may judge him or herself, although a pardon is not a judgment.  It is an act of mercy or forgiveness.  Is there any valid or justfiable rationale that would allow only one citizen out of hundreds of millions to legally forgive himself?  If the Office of the President is, in effect, indivisible from the person of the President, then, I think, logic may dictate that no pardon of the President could be issued.  If there is not absolute identity between the President and the Office of the President, then possibly a pardon could be issued.  This is all speculation on my part, and the courts, which may have the final say in the matter, could, of course, have a completely different analysis, or may find that my analysis, if it was advanced by one of the parties, is entirely wrong.  I am stating that the courts "may" have the final say because Trump would undoubtedly argue that the courts have no say in the matter, and that it is for him, or the Office of the President, alone to decide.  There is no way to really know how the courts may hold on these questions.  I do not know if there is any precedent and I have not attempted to research this topic.  In my opinion, if Trump did try to pardon himself, it would certainly stink to high heaven.

A pardon issued by a President does not shield from prosecution or conviction of state crimes that may have been committed as of the time of issuance of the pardon.  It only shields from prosecution or conviction of federal crimes.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
5.1  Raven Wing  replied to  Gsquared @5    3 weeks ago

Great comment G. Very informative and a good insight into the judicial process in various situations.

Thank you for sharing.

 
 
 
Gsquared
5.1.1  Gsquared  replied to  Raven Wing @5.1    3 weeks ago

Thanks Raven Wing.   Unfortunately, as to the question of whether a President can pardon himself, it is a whole lot of words just to say "We don't really know."

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
6  sandy-2021492    3 weeks ago
perfectly coiffed hairstyle

Boy, is that ever a matter of opinion.

 
 
 
devangelical
6.1  devangelical  replied to  sandy-2021492 @6    3 weeks ago

he's running out of hair to comb over his ever expanding hourglass shaped bald spot...

 
 
 
Paula Bartholomew
6.1.1  Paula Bartholomew  replied to  devangelical @6.1    2 weeks ago

Maybe Eric and Don Jr will go out and shoot an endangered animal and give Daddy the pelt for him to wear as new hair.

 
 
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