Testimony In Chauvin Trial Comes To An End

  

Category:  News & Politics

By:  john-russell  •  one month ago  •  26 comments

Testimony In Chauvin Trial Comes To An End
The defense seems to have been that Chauvin was distracted by bystanders on the nearby sidewalk (who were yelling at Chauvin to please stop killing Floyd), or that Floyd caused his own death by ingesting drugs, or that Floyd died from a heart attack, or , a last ditch attempt to say that the exhaust from the squad car Floyd was laid out next to poisoned him with carbon monoxide.


Both the prosecution and the defense have rested in the Derek Chauvin trial. Closing arguments will begin Monday morning, with jury deliberation to follow.  

I have watched parts of the trial over the past three weeks, usually on ABC News channel, which is a 24 hour news app and not the main broadcast channel.  Not a left wing source. Generally, the legal experts on ABC News seem to believe that the evidence against Chauvin is very strong. Not only do they have the video and eyewitness testimony proving Chauvin knelt on Floyd's neck for 9 minutes, and video and audio showing that numerous bystanders shouted to Chauvin that Floyd was unconscious, the prosecution also had police department witnesses, including the Minneapolis police chief, who testified that Chauvin did not follow proper police procedures. The prosecution also had medical testimony indicating that Floyd died of lack of oxygen caused by obstructed breathing due to his lungs being compressed by Chauvin.  

The defense seems to have been that Chauvin was distracted by bystanders on the nearby sidewalk (who were yelling at Chauvin to please stop killing Floyd), or that Floyd caused his own death by ingesting drugs, or that Floyd died from a heart attack, or , a last ditch attempt to say that the exhaust from the squad car Floyd was laid out next to poisoned him with carbon monoxide. All the defense issues seem to have been countered by the prosecution. 

Will there be "riots" if somehow, against overwhelming evidence, Chauvin is acquitted ? 

What do you think ? 


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JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1  author  JohnRussell    one month ago

I think he's looking at a ten year prison sentence, and it's that low only because it's not possible prove that he intended to kill Floyd. 

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.1  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one month ago

I still think that the jury will come back with 2nd degree homicide, but I could definitely be wrong; it's certainly been known to happen.

10 year sentence is manslaughter, right?

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @1.1    one month ago

I'm not sure, I'm just guessing as to the sentence. I don't think he will be acquitted though. He really didnt present much of a defense. 

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.1.2  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.1    one month ago

OH I definitely don't think he'll be acquitted. He doesn't deserve to be either.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1.3  author  JohnRussell  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @1.1.2    one month ago

At numerous times during this trial his defense as presented by his lawyer seemed to be that the "crowd" distracted him and he lost track of what he was doing to Floyd. I find that ridiculous. 

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.1.4  Trout Giggles  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.3    one month ago

That's a bullshit defense. It's like when I was a kid and my mom would ask me why I did something bad..."I dunno"

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1.5  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Trout Giggles @1.1.4    one month ago

Of course. If he was paying so much attention to what the crowd was doing why didn't he pay attention when they told him Floyd wasn't breathing ?

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
1.1.6  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.3    one month ago
the "crowd" distracted him and he lost track of what he was doing to Floyd.

Yeah, and I'm a virgin, just ask my kids.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
2  Trout Giggles    one month ago
The prosecution also had medical testimony indicating that Floyd died of lack of oxygen caused by obstructed breathing due to his lungs being compressed by Chauvin.  

So then why the story about CO poisoning because of where he was laying in relation to the exhaust pipe? Chauvin didn't spend much money on an attorney did he? Did he go to Attorneys R Us?

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Trout Giggles @2    one month ago
So then why the story about CO poisoning because of where he was laying in relation to the exhaust pipe? Chauvin didn't spend much money on an attorney did he? Did he go to Attorneys R Us?

Grasping at straws.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
2.2  Ender  replied to  Trout Giggles @2    one month ago

I read about that. Was shaking my head at the stupidity.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
2.2.1  Trout Giggles  replied to  Ender @2.2    one month ago

I think Chauvin scraped the bottom of the barrel for his defense lawyer. Then again, maybe nobody wanted to touch his case. It was a loser from the very beginning

 
 
 
r.t..b...
Masters Participates
3  r.t..b...    one month ago

The defense rests after a day as they have no defense.

They are hanging their hat on paid ‘experts’, claims that do not support the obvious evidence, but more precisely and most disturbing, decades of similar trials ending in acquittals. 

Hopefully, we will see justice served and this will become the beginning to an all too frequent and tragic end. 

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Masters Guide
4  Greg Jones    one month ago

Too much uncertainty about COD, no intent tto kill.... equals manslaughter.

And yes there will be riots.

Putting aside felony murder, the real difference between first and second-degree murder is the intent or mindset the defendant had when they took the action they did. Third-degree murder (also called manslaughter) is an unplanned, unintentional killing that is not part of another felony.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
5  Ender    one month ago

It was his heart, it was the exhaust pipe, it was drugs, it was the crowd distracting me...

No, it was you, period.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
6  Buzz of the Orient    one month ago
"Will there be "riots" if somehow, against overwhelming evidence, Chauvin is acquitted ?  What do you think ?"

If he's acqutted I believe that the explosion in the USA (and echoed around the world) will make January 6th look like a kindergarten play. 

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
6.1  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  Buzz of the Orient @6    one month ago
If he's acqutted I believe that the explosion in the USA (and echoed around the world) will make January 6th look like a kindergarten play. 

i doubt there will be an aquittal , hung jury maybe , im thinking the manslaughter charge may hold though i dont think there is enough to get the unanimous vote for the other 2 charges 

Only explosion will be in progressive liberal areas unhappy with the verdict even if it is just the 2nd degree manslaughter , verdict day might be a good day to have the "blue flu".

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
6.1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Mark in Wyoming @6.1    one month ago

Well, thankfully I'm far enough away that if he's acquitted there's bound to not be much reaction about it here.  

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
6.1.2  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  Buzz of the Orient @6.1.1    one month ago

same here , seems my little slice of what i call close enough to heaven has been immune thus far from the riots and protests , besides i doubt the locals would put up with that sort of stuff like property destruction and the like , though they would support peaceful protests , i have seen them do so .

 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Expert
7  Tacos!    one month ago

No verdict will please everyone. Rioters gonna riot anyway. A case like this is actually really complicated, but virtually no one who takes to the streets will have listened to the whole trial, much less with an open mind. They will want a first degree murder conviction without knowing the evidence or the law.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
7.1  Ender  replied to  Tacos! @7    one month ago
A case like this is actually really complicated

I disagree. I think it is one of the more simpler ones.

The snippets I have seen really doesn't sound like the defence did all that great of a job.

I doubt he will get that harsh a sentence though. Then I wondered if he could appeal.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
7.1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Ender @7.1    one month ago

From all that I read and saw the defence appeared to me to be pretty weak while the prosecution's case appeared pretty strong but of course i wasn't in the courtroom, and as you know it takes just one rotten apple in the basket to spoil the whole bunch.  We're not on the jury nor will we be able to listen in to the deliberations, so who knows what will happen?  I'm sure this case will be appealed if he's convicted. 

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
7.1.2  Ender  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @7.1.1    one month ago
and as you know it takes just one rotten apple in the basket to spoil the whole bunch

True. Also, Donny Osmond lied to us.....

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
8  author  JohnRussell    one month ago

I have a good friend who was a Chicago cop for almost 30 years. I asked him today if he did or would ever arrest someone for trying to pass a counterfeit 20 dollar bill and he just laughed and said never. 

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
8.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  JohnRussell @8    one month ago

If it was a good enough counterfeit how would the person passing it even be aware of it?  It would be hard to prove intent unless it was a consistent event.  When I was teaching in a high school here I was passed a 50 yuan note (about US$8) that I then paid a cabbie to return to the school.  The next day the cabbie showed up with the vice-principal and I was shown why that 50 was counterfeit so I repaid him. I had no idea.

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
Professor Silent
8.1.1  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  Buzz of the Orient @8.1    one month ago

most people wont know buzz , but things have got high tech with US currency , they make pens that react to the paper temporarily and shows a certain color if its real and another if its fake , usually small places have the pen , which they can get at the bank , and have a policy of checking certain denominations , usually anything over a 50 here gets checked , some places check 20s and up , just depends on where you are and what has been attempted to be passed locally , here its usually 20s ..

other anti counterfitting things are the watermarks on each denomination the denominations president in watermark as well as the thread with the microprinting on it  denoting denomination

 
 
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