Mitch McConnell's Re-Election: The Numbers Don't Add Up | DCReport.org

  

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Mitch McConnell's Re-Election: The Numbers Don't Add Up | DCReport.org
Mitch McConnell's Re-Election: The Numbers Don't Add Up. How Does an 18% Approval Rating Result in a 58% Win for the Senator?

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


Elections, Featured Story, The Latest News

Why The Numbers Behind Mitch McConnell's Re-Election Don't Add Up


How Does an 18% Approval Rating Result in a 58% Win?


By Alison Greene

Alison Greene

On a Thursday in August in Louisville, months before the 2020 election, a parade of cars filled with Kentucky Teamster representatives and labor groups, showed their fury at Mitch McConnell's constant blocking of critical COVID aid. They drove by McConnell's office raucously honking and bearing signs saying "Mitch better have my money."

In 2017, a Public Policy Polling Survey asked Kentuckians, "Do you approve or disapprove of Senator Mitch McConnell's job performance?" Only 18% approved. He clawed his rating back up to 39% on the eve of the election.

McConnell, leader of Senate Republicans, rarely holds town hall meetings with Kentucky voters—not since a heated exchange with an angry constituent went viral.


1 out of 5 voters appear to have filled out their ballots with votes for both the female Democrat Amy McGrath and the Republican pussy-grabber Donald Trump.

So, what exactly drove these angry Kentuckians to re-elect Mitch McConnell with a 19-point advantage over opponent Amy McGrath—57.8% to 38.2%?

Even as Republicans across the country still insist that the election was rife with fraudulent Democratic votes, no one's asking how McConnell managed one of the most lopsided landslides of the Nov. 3 election. They should. An investigation of Kentucky voting results by DCReport raises significant questions about the vote tallies in McConnell's state.

  • McConnell racked up huge vote leads in traditionally Democratic strongholds, including counties that he had never before carried.
  • There were wide, unexplained discrepancies between the vote counts for presidential candidates and down-ballot candidates.
  • Significant anomalies exist in the state's voter records. Forty percent of the state's counties carry more voters on their rolls than voting-age citizens.
  • Kentucky and many other states using vote tabulation machines made by Election Systems & Software all reported down-ballot race results at significant odds with pre-election polls.

The 2020 Kentucky U.S. Senate election results map

DCReport focused on the results in three counties in eastern Kentucky's Appalachian Mountains, two of which Democrats usually always win, but similar patterns emerge in other counties across the state. Even in counties that voted overwhelmingly for Democrats as recently as the 2019 gubernatorial election, there were a staggering number of Democrats voting Republican in 2020.

In rural Breathitt County, for instance, there are 9,508 registered Democrats and just 1,599 registered Republicans. The county has a history of close contests, but Amy McGrath got only 1,652 votes versus 3,738 for McConnell, a 67% to 29% trouncing. McGrath's votes, if accurate, equaled only 17% of registered Democrats in Breathitt County.

Conventional political wisdom in McConnell-land holds that these days "ancestral Kentucky Democrats" vote Republican, and analysts shouldn't correlate party registration with voting patterns. But simply dismissing any anomalies based on anecdotal hearsay ignores the data and other possible explanations. McConnell won Breathitt County in 2020 with 1,308 more votes than he received in the county's much closer 2014 race, which he won by fewer than 400 votes. The 2019 governor's race was also a squeaker in Breathitt County, but Democrat Andy Beshear eked out a 69-vote victory. Beshear won the race statewide.

McConnell's results were even more out of whack in two other nearby Appalachian counties. In his six previous Senate elections, Elliott and Wolfe counties had never voted for McConnell. Even up to last year, Elliott County remained reliably Democratic in non-presidential races, voting for the party's entire Democratic slate in both the 2015 and 2019 statewide elections. Yet in 2020, McConnell won 64% of the votes in Wolfe County and 66% of the votes in Elliott County. McGrath only got 21% of registered Democrats in Wolfe and 20% in Elliott.

Next, take the premise that there would be some basic logic in the voting patterns of those who did vote Democratic. One might expect a registered Democrat, who's going to vote Democratic, would walk into the booth and cast votes for both Joe Biden and Amy McGrath. But the data tell another story. In 119 of 120 counties, Amy McGrath got more votes than Joe Biden. In some counties, the votes were close. But in counties like Breathitt and Elliott, 1 out of 5 voters appear to have filled out their ballots with votes for both the female Democrat Amy McGrath and the Republican pussy-grabber Donald Trump.

Then there is the question of why a county like Breathitt has more registered voters than it has people of voting age? 2019 population data show Breathitt County had 12,630 people with approximately 23% below the voting age of 18. This means approximately 9,700 people are of voting age, yet there are 11,497 registered voters. Having 100% of the voting-age population registered would be astounding enough, but Breathitt County appears to have almost 120% more registered voters than age-eligible citizens. And looking further, it appears this is not limited to Breathitt.

In November 2017, Judicial Watch, a right-wing non-partisan foundation promoting transparency, sued Kentucky over its "Dirty Voter Rolls" and its failure to maintain accurate voter registration lists. The suit argued that 48 of the 120 Kentucky counties had more registered voters than citizens over the age of 18 and alleged that Kentucky was one of only three states with a statewide active registration rate greater than 100% of the age-eligible citizen population. Kentucky's inflated voter rolls and lack of transparency provide a perfect cover for malfeasant behavior regarding the election results.

Turning an 18% approval into a 58% win may seem like a "turning water into wine"-style miracle, but a "smoke & mirrors" parlor trick seems more likely. To better understand how the data could have been manipulated, look no further than Trump's own legal filings. In an incompetent post-election lawsuit, the Trump team may have intended to accuse Democrats of election fraud, but in describing a possible plot, they attributed the cheating to Trump himself.

In a Dec. 4 filing in Georgia, Trump's legal team referred to a "machine-controlled algorithm deliberately run" by a voting machine vendor, Dominion Voting Systems. They allege this algorithm "generally took more than 2.5% of the votes from Mr. Biden and flipped them to Mr. Trump." So Trump's own legal team, instead of providing evidence of fraud by Biden's side, may have inadvertently revealed fraud benefiting Trump. In describing a deliberate, vendor installed, machine-controlled algorithm automatically taking a percentage of Biden's votes and giving them to Trump, they certainly are outlining how fraud could have been executed.

Trump's team claims Dominion was the machine vendor embedding algorithms to "flip" votes but is Trump pointing to one machine vendor to distract from another?

In Kentucky, when looking at counties where the numbers leap out on behalf of Mitch McConnell, none used Dominion machines. Most used machines from Election Systems & Software (ES&S), a Dominion competitor. If you swap ES&S for Dominion in the alleged vote-flipping scheme, you may arrive at an alternate explanation for why Amy McGrath's numbers weren't lining up and correlating with Biden's.

To steal an election it may make sense to use different algorithms for each race on the ballot so results did not appear to be uniform. Knowing the McGrath-McConnell race faced more nationwide scrutiny, schemers might have had to miscount votes by different margins in the presidential and Senate races. Flipping more votes from Biden to Trump than McGrath votes to McConnell would explain her getting approximately 20% more votes than the Democratic presidential candidate.

Significantly, Trump and his post-election legal team have pointed at Dominion voting machines and implored courts to look into this automated vote-flipping premise—but only in states that he lost. So, let's test it in ES&S states like Kentucky where Trump won.

McConnell had his biggest percentage of registered Democrats voting Republican in counties using ES&S machines. But he wasn't the only senator to perform so well. Other Republican incumbents, whom polls indicated would have close races, had similar luck to their majority leader on Election D8thay.

Lindsey Graham's race in South Carolina was so tight that he infamously begged for money, yet he won with a comfortable 10% lead—tabulated on ES&S machines throughout the state. In Susan Collins' Maine, where she never had a lead in a poll after July 2, almost every ballot was fed through ES&S machines. Kentucky, South Carolina, Maine, Texas, Iowa and Florida are all states that use ES&S machines. Maybe the polls didn't actually get it wrong.

When Trump says "look over here" at Dominion voting machines, maybe we should look at ES&S machines instead. When Republicans spout unfounded claims that Democrats stole the election, maybe we should be looking at Republican vote totals instead. And when Trump calls this the most fraudulent election in our history, maybe he knows of what he speaks.

You can follow Alison Greene on Twitter @GrassrootsSpeak.

Post Views: 420,843electionKentuckymcconnellMcGrathsenate


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JBB
PhD Principal
1  seeder  JBB    2 weeks ago

Something is rotten in Kentucky. What's up Mitch?

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
1.1  Ender  replied to  JBB @1    2 weeks ago

I read an article that ol mitch has a list of his would be replacements in case something happens to him in office.

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Expert
1.2  Tacos!  replied to  JBB @1    2 weeks ago
Something is rotten in Kentucky.

What makes you say that? It looks to me that even though McConnell might not have super high approval ratings, the voters still preferred him over the available alternative. The approval rating of an incumbent compares him to the voter's ideal of the perfect representative. It does not compare him to his opponent in an election.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2  Texan1211    2 weeks ago

Why The Numbers Behind Mitch McConnell's Re-Election Don't Add Up

How Does An 18% Approval Rating Result In A 58% Win?

This is so untrue as to be hilarious.

In the article, it states that his approval rating was back up to 39% by election day.

The 18% was 3 YEARS before the 2020 elections.

How misleading is this?

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.1  Ozzwald  replied to  Texan1211 @2    2 weeks ago
In the article, it states that his approval rating was back up to 39% by election day.

Wow, so around 1 in 3 Kentuckians approve of the way he is doing his job.  He must be so proud.

Here's something you thought you'd never hear, Trump had a higher approval rating.....

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.1.1  Texan1211  replied to  Ozzwald @2.1    2 weeks ago
Wow, so around 1 in 3 Kentuckians approve of the way he is doing his job.  He must be so proud.

Approval polls mean next to nothing.

Look at Congressional ratings--abysmally low--and then look how many win reelection.

Meh.

You can get excited about a poll that means nothing, really, but no sense in me trying to join your little bandwagon.

And since he won reelection, it kind of proves MY point that the poll is meaningless, right?

Congressional ratings by year:

Congress Approval Ratings - Historic Job Approval Data (thoughtco.com)

Congress Approval Ratings Through History

Here's a look at the Gallup's organization's numbers by year. The approval ratings shown here are from the public opinion surveys conducted the latest in each year listed.

  • 2016: 18%
  • 2015: 13%
  • 2014: 16%
  • 2013: 12%
  • 2012: 18%
  • 2011: 11%
  • 2010: 13%
  • 2009: 25%
  • 2008: 20%
  • 2007: 22%
  • 2006: 21%
  • 2005: 29%
  • 2004: 41%
  • 2003: 43%
  • 2002: 50%
  • 2001: 72%
  • 2000: 56%
  • 1999: 37%
  • 1998: 42%
  • 1997: 39%
  • 1996: 34%
  • 1995: 30%
  • 1994: 23%
  • 1993: 24%
  • 1992: 18%
  • 1991: 40%
  • 1990: 26%
  • 1989: Not Available

Despite Congress' historically abysmal approval ratings, well over 90 percent of House and Senate members who seek re-election win their races on average, according to data published from the Center for Responsive Politics in Washington, D.C.

 
 
 
MrFrost
Masters Principal
2.1.2  MrFrost  replied to  Texan1211 @2.1.1    2 weeks ago
Look at Congressional ratings

I thought the article was about  Mitch McConnell? 

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
2.1.3  Texan1211  replied to  MrFrost @2.1.2    2 weeks ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Expert
2.1.4  Tacos!  replied to  MrFrost @2.1.2    2 weeks ago
I thought the article was about  Mitch McConnell? 

No, it's actually not. It's not about Mitch McConnell at all. Did you read it?

It's about polls and elections, and whether or not approval polls should predict the outcome of an election. The author clearly thinks they should, but that is not a reasonable assumption.

 
 
 
MrFrost
Masters Principal
3  MrFrost    2 weeks ago

The election was clearly rigged, same with Graham. He said himself that he was getting destroyed and was on fox fake news begging for money.... Yet he still won. Weird. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
3.1  Texan1211  replied to  MrFrost @3    2 weeks ago
The election was clearly rigged, same with Graham.

Please provide any proof you can for this claim.

And then turn it over to the authorities.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
3.2  Tessylo  replied to  MrFrost @3    2 weeks ago

That's the only way Ms. Lindsey and Moscow Bitch Mitch could win - by LYING, CHEATING, AND STEALING!!!!!!!!!!

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Expert
3.3  Tacos!  replied to  MrFrost @3    2 weeks ago
The election was clearly rigged

Why is that clear?

 
 
 
Ronin2
Senior Quiet
4  Ronin2    2 weeks ago

Democrats trying to claim that Republicans cheated with no damn proof. How can they even look at themselves in the mirror?

Let's tick off the hypocrisy shall we from the left.

1) Not purging voters roll. Funny, I thought that purging voter rolls was an evil Republican tactic resulting in voter suppression. The left have never been for it; and railed in fury wherever it is tried. Now suddenly they are for it. Didn't realize Mitch controlled the voter rolls in Kentucky. Considering the governor is a Democrat- and appoints the election board.

The State Board of Elections consists of the Secretary of State Michael G. Adams, who serves as the chief election official, and eight members appointed by the Governor from lists supplied by the two political parties in the Commonwealth and the Kentucky County Clerks Association.
The current members of the Board are:

​Democratic Members Republican Members
​Albert B. Chandler, III
Term expires: 9/15/2022
Versailles
​DeAnna Brangers
Term expires: 4/1/2024
Prospect

Sherry Whitehouse
Term expires: 9/15/2022
Brooks

Cory Skolnick
Term expires: 9/15/2022
Louisville

Jerry D. Johnson
Term expires: 4/1/2024
Frankfort
Lynn Lane
Term expires: 3/19/2023
Wickliffe
Dwight Sears
Term expires: 9/15/2022
Somerset​
James Lewis
Term Expires: 3/19/2023
Wooton
The Board’s day-to-day operations are carried out by an Executive Director, an Assistant Director and a bipartisan   staff   sufficient to carry out its duties.
 
The Board’s Duties:
  • Ensure Kentucky’s compliance with federal election law
  • Ensure Kentucky’s compliance with state election law
  • Provide and maintain the statewide voter registration database
  • Appoint county board of elections members
  • Train county clerks and county board of election members

2) Claiming a certified election was rigged. Thought there wasn't any damn voter fraud! That is what we keep on hearing day in and day out from the rabid leftists.

3) Using a fucking poll to base their entire BS premise on. Polls can be made to say any damn thing the polling company wants. They could have oversampled Democratic areas greatly. In fact it is pretty much guaranteed. They probably also recorded "fuck you" and hang ups as votes for the Democrat.

4) And this is the funniest damn thing on the planet:

In a Dec. 4 filing in Georgia, Trump's legal team referred to a "machine-controlled algorithm deliberately run" by a voting machine vendor, Dominion Voting Systems. They allege this algorithm "generally took more than 2.5% of the votes from Mr. Biden and flipped them to Mr. Trump." So Trump's own legal team, instead of providing evidence of fraud by Biden's side, may have inadvertently revealed fraud benefiting Trump. In describing a deliberate, vendor installed, machine-controlled algorithm automatically taking a percentage of Biden's votes and giving them to Trump, they certainly are outlining how fraud could have been executed.

You are trying to say that Dominion Voting Systems machines- which the left claim were fine everywhere else; were corrupted here? Get in line for your slander lawsuit from the company. The author will hopefully get his summons really soon.

Hey, maybe the butt sore Democratic loser can run to Queen Nancy and get the election results overturned? She doesn't give a shit about fair and open elections that have been certified already by the state.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
4.1  Tessylo  replied to  Ronin2 @4    2 weeks ago

republicans CAN'T WIN UNLESS THEY LIE, CHEAT, AND STEAL 

VOTER SUPPRESSION

You forgot to include 'leftist brown shirts'

 
 
 
bccrane
Freshman Silent
4.2  bccrane  replied to  Ronin2 @4    2 weeks ago

I read some of the article and something isn't even mentioned as to why McGrath lost, her stance on coal and the use of coal miners with black lung in an ad without their permission, that, I would imagine, is why McConnell won.

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Expert
5  Tacos!    2 weeks ago

Very often, polls do not predict how someone will vote because they aren’t designed to do that.

The poll question was “Do you approve or disapprove of Senator Mitch McConnell’s job performance?”

It was not, “Will you vote for Mitch McConnell for reelection?” Nor was it “Will you vote for Mitch McConnell if his opponent is Amy McGrath?” It is this latter question that is not asked in the poll, but is asked by having an election.

The poll also did not ask for an approval rating of Amy McGrath, so how are we to compare? A poll that asked that question might have given her an even lower number than McConnell got. In fact, given the outcome of the election, that seems likely.

Very often, measurements, tests, experiments, and polls do not measure the things they are represented to measure, nor do they predict the things their creators claim they predict.

Many politicians have poor approval ratings, but on Election Day, the voters decide that the candidate is a better choice than the available alternatives.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
5.1  Texan1211  replied to  Tacos! @5    2 weeks ago

The whole premise is fatally flawed. They are taking some polls from three years before the election and using those numbers as a basis for their claims of fraud.

And as you point out, job approval doesn't mean votes.

Which is why I pointed out low approval numbers for Congress as a whole, but still 90% of them get reelected.

 
 
 
Tacos!
PhD Expert
5.1.1  Tacos!  replied to  Texan1211 @5.1    2 weeks ago

These pollsters, pundits, and general morons like to imagine that polls on approval ratings are meaningful. They're not.

Approval ratings polls essentially ask the respondent to compare the candidate to their ideal vision of what an elected official should be. But the ideal politician is never on the ballot.

 
 
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