Mr. Zelensky Goes to Washington

  

Category:  Op/Ed

Via:  vic-eldred  •  one month ago  •  49 comments

By:   The Editorial Board (WSJ)

Mr. Zelensky Goes to Washington
The U.S. would be far worse off today if Putin had conquered Ukraine.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



Volodymyr Zelensky's visit to Washington on Wednesday is a symbolically important moment after 10 brutal months of war in Ukraine. With his first trip abroad since the Russian invasion began on Feb. 24, the Ukrainian President is signaling how vital the U.S. is to his country's survival, as Vladimir Putin attempts to bomb Kyiv into submission, and maybe the Stone Age.

Mr. Zelensky, in his trademark fatigues, met President Biden at the White House and addressed Congress. He has been a brave and charismatic wartime leader, and his speech was eloquent in explaining that Ukraine is fighting for its independence as Americans once did. He thanked Americans for their support, and he sought more aid as the war moves into the harsh winter months.

Mr. Biden announced another $1.85 billion in military aid and hardware, including some long sought weapons that the U.S. has been reluctant to provide. The Pentagon will deliver a Patriot missile-defense battery to intercept more of Russia’s assault from the skies against civilians and electric-power sites. The shame is this will take weeks to deliver and could be there now if the U.S. had acted sooner.

The aid package also includes more ammo for the Himars artillery missile systems as well as “precision aerial munitions.” The latter are usually launched from fixed-wing aircraft, which makes us wonder why the U.S. has been reluctant to provide old F-16s.

The U.S. has so far provided some $21.9 billion in total military or other aid, and Congress this week is voting on another $45 billion in support that will be rolled out in the coming months. Some countries such as the Baltic states have donated more as a share of national GDP. But the U.S. has provided by far the most in dollars and military hardware.

Opposition to more aid is building in some U.S. quarters on the right and left. Ten months ago the fear was that Kyiv would lose in a rout and escalate the war against NATO if the alliance aided Kyiv. Now the worry is that Russia might lose and that could cause Mr. Putin to escalate against NATO.

There’s no predicting what the willful Kremlin dictator might do, but one thing the war has taught is that Russia’s military is far less formidable than most believed. Despite fewer men and less firepower, Ukrainians have imposed ferocious casualties and fought Russia to a stalemate. Ukraine’s tenacity has also served America’s interests as well as its own.





It’s worth thinking about what the world would look like today if Mr. Putin had crushed Kyiv within days as he and U.S. intelligence services expected. Russian forces would now control nearly all of Ukraine and man the border of Poland and other frontline NATO states. If an insurgency broke out in Ukraine, Mr. Putin would be blaming those countries for aiding the “terrorists,” whether they did or not, and threatening retaliation.





Moldova would have been next to fall to Russia, and one or more of the Baltic states would be in his sites. NATO would be divided over how to respond for fear of Mr. Putin’s wrath, and forget about Finland and Sweden joining the alliance as they are currently doing. Germany would be especially conflicted, and all of Western Europe would be more vulnerable to Russia’s energy blackmail.

The cost of shoring up NATO, with Russian tanks on its doorstep, would arguably have been even greater in the long run. U.S. credibility also would have suffered another blow, compounding the damage from the Afghanistan retreat. Critics who say helping Ukraine has hurt deterrence against China have it exactly wrong. China’s Xi Jinping would have had greater cause to doubt U.S. resolve to defend Taiwan had the U.S. abandoned Ukraine.

Mr. Putin’s strategy is to punish the Ukrainian people and impose economic costs on the West with a goal of outlasting the democracies. But Mr. Zelensky and Ukrainians deserve continued U.S. support, and the fastest way to end the war is to provide Kyiv with the weapons to win as soon as possible.


Some Republicans in Congress are now claiming there should be no support for Ukraine while the U.S. southern border isn’t secure. But that argument is a non sequitur. There are enough resources to do both. The problem at the border is Mr. Biden’s failure of will to do anything to stop the migrant flood.

All wars end with some form of negotiation, and this one will too. But Mr. Putin betrays no willingness to do so on anything other than his terms. The faster and more decisively Ukraine regains its territory, the sooner Russia may reconsider its disastrous war.


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Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1  seeder  Vic Eldred    one month ago


There is no doubt that Europe and the US are much better off with a free Ukraine and as we learned long ago, Americans don't seem to mind fighting proxy wars in which no American troops are involved. There is still a price, of course, and here the price thus far has been $110 Billion, Patriot Missiles & other US military weapon systems and a neglected souther border.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
1.1  Ronin2  replied to  Vic Eldred @1    one month ago

Funny how Democrats care so damn much about Ukraine's borders; and don't give a shit about our own.

$110 billion; and a commitment from Brandon the Human Fuck Up Machine to send "whatever it takes for as long as it takes". Hell, Zelensky can't believe his luck that Brandon is already discussing the US paying for Ukraine to be rebuilt. That is a NATO/EU job; but we will be stuck with the bill. So is this war; but the US is doing all of the heavy lifting.

I will ask again; what the hell is the US reliant on Ukraine for? What does Ukraine have (outside of a corrupt as hell government- and huge kick back fund for politicians and their family members on the tax payer dime) that we cannot; and should be; supplying for ourselves?

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.1.1  seeder  Vic Eldred  replied to  Ronin2 @1.1    one month ago
Funny how Democrats care so damn much about Ukraine's borders; and don't give a shit about our own.

Isn't it?


$110 billion; and a commitment from Brandon the Human Fuck Up Machine to send "whatever it takes for as long as it takes".

I'm also fond of the "whatever it takes" philosophy. I apply it to taking down the left.


Hell, Zelensky can't believe his luck that Brandon is already discussing the US paying for Ukraine to be rebuilt.

That pipedream ends with the next congress.


I will ask again; what the hell is the US reliant on Ukraine for?

For wearing down what Hillary Clinton has defined as our # 1 enemy.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
1.1.2  Ronin2  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.1.1    one month ago
I'm also fond of the "whatever it takes" philosophy. I apply it to taking down the left.

I am not willing to go that far. So long as it is within the Constitution and legal. Democrats have made a mockery of the Constitution and the Law. I don't care how big of a piece of shit Trump is; he is entitled to the same protection as everyone else under both. 

For wearing down what Hillary Clinton has defined as our # 1 enemy.

Xi is laughing his ass off at the US for thinking that China isn't the top threat around. The longer the US concentrates all of it's resources on Russia; the less it will have to bring to bear on China when the day comes Xi takes Taiwan.

That pipedream ends with the next congress.

I hope you are right. I do not trust Establishment Republicans like McConnell and McCarthy. They will sell us out in a heartbeat if the Establishment dictates it. Right now Ukraine is the apple of the Establishment's eye.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.1.3  seeder  Vic Eldred  replied to  Ronin2 @1.1.2    one month ago

FklEF6eWIAEv0Nw?format=jpg&name=small

 
 
 
Jasper2529
Professor Participates
1.1.4  Jasper2529  replied to  Ronin2 @1.1    one month ago
So is this war; but the US is doing all of the heavy lifting.

As usual.

 
 
 
Just Jim NC TttH
Professor Principal
1.1.5  Just Jim NC TttH  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.1.3    one month ago

WTH???

 
 
 
George
Freshman Guide
1.1.6  George  replied to  Just Jim NC TttH @1.1.5    one month ago

He had a flashback to his daughter in the shower. 

 
 
 
JBB
Professor Principal
1.1.7  JBB  replied to  Just Jim NC TttH @1.1.5    one month ago

Who knew Biden had 5 foot arm length?

Nobody is gullible enough to believe it...

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Guide
1.1.8  Greg Jones  replied to  Ronin2 @1.1    one month ago

So you wouldn't have a problem with Russia crushing Ukraine and becoming an instant threat to other nations in the region?

No, this is a turning point in history, and the Russian Bear can never be allowed to attack another nation again.

And yes, once again, the US is doing most of the heavy lifting.

 
 
 
Hallux
Junior Principal
1.1.9  Hallux  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.1.3    one month ago

Some pictures may be worth a 1000 words, the pic you posted is worth one: FAKE.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
1.1.10  Tessylo  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.1.3    one month ago

That's so hateful and fake

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.1.11  seeder  Vic Eldred  replied to  Hallux @1.1.9    one month ago
Some pictures may be worth a 1000 words, the pic you posted is worth one: FAKE.

Anyone with a half a brain knows that's a joke.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.1.12  devangelical  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.1.11    one month ago

... and anyone with half a brain would think it's funny.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
1.1.13  Tessylo  replied to  devangelical @1.1.12    one month ago

jrSmiley_91_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
magicschoolbusdropout
Sophomore Principal
1.1.14  magicschoolbusdropout  replied to  devangelical @1.1.12    one month ago
and anyone with half a brain would think it's funny.

See Comment 1.1.13 jrSmiley_91_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.1.15  seeder  Vic Eldred  replied to  Tessylo @1.1.13    one month ago

FkriL5EXEAAg5pW?format=jpg&name=small

jrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Hallux
Junior Principal
1.1.16  Hallux  replied to  Vic Eldred @1.1.11    one month ago
Anyone with a half a brain knows that's a joke.

Anyone with 3/4 of a brain knows it's a poor joke driven by BDS.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1.1.17  seeder  Vic Eldred  replied to  Hallux @1.1.16    one month ago

As Tiberius said of the German tribes: "Some people just don't know when they've been conquered."

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
1.2  Nerm_L  replied to  Vic Eldred @1    one month ago
There is no doubt that Europe and the US are much better off with a free Ukraine and as we learned long ago, Americans don't seem to mind fighting proxy wars in which no American troops are involved. There is still a price, of course, and here the price thus far has been $110 Billion, Patriot Missiles & other US military weapon systems and a neglected souther border.

I do not understand why Ukraine is so important to the United States.  The United States has been bogged down in this quagmire for seven years.  The United States began providing monetary aid to Ukraine in 2015 and began supplying military arms in 2019.  Why?

The war did not start with the Russian invasion last February.  The war began in 2014, during the Obama Presidency, when the existing government was toppled.  Joe Biden was there as Vice President, well before the 2016 election in the United States.  There really has been open warfare inside Ukraine since 2015.  

Ukraine has been a proxy of the United States since 2015.  Ukraine has certainly not been 'free', whatever that may mean.  Ukraine lost control of its national borders in 2014 when the existing government was toppled and lost its independence in 2015 when Ukraine became a proxy of the United States.  The involvement of the United States has only resulted in progressive escalation of the war.  Ukraine was a quagmire before Russia invaded in 2022 and that's not going to change by supplying more support.  

The reality is that Ukraine is another failed attempt at nation building by the United States.  Ukraine has become completely dependent upon the United States but is reverting back to its Soviet past as a guide for internal governance.  

 
 
 
Dismayed Patriot
Professor Participates
1.2.1  Dismayed Patriot  replied to  Nerm_L @1.2    one month ago
Ukraine lost control of its national borders in 2014 when the existing government was toppled and lost its independence in 2015 when Ukraine became a proxy of the United States.

Did you rewrite that Russian propaganda into your own words or just cut and paste it from RT?

Ukraine was under a corrupt leader who was stealing the nations wealth and allying with Russian oligarchs and Putin before the people had enough and toppled the treasonous criminal Poroshenko. Your sorry bullshit version of events is clearly scraped from the gutter that is the FSB propaganda wing.

Fuck Russian propaganda and any useless piece of shit traitor who disseminates it. Taking Russia's side after their unwarranted and unprovoked attack on Ukraine and defending Putin and his crimes is inexcusable. Those who do so have the blood of innocent civilians on their hands and should be ashamed, but clearly such worthless losers have no shame.

 
 
 
JBB
Professor Principal
1.2.2  JBB  replied to  Dismayed Patriot @1.2.1    one month ago

True, but Putin's version of the story is US backed Ukrainian Nazis overthrew the very popular former Russian backed regime...

 
 
 
shona1
Junior Participates
1.2.3  shona1  replied to  JBB @1.2.2    one month ago

Morning jbb...and we wouldn't expect Putin to say anything else..as he tries to justify his insane invasion of Ukraine.

As they say the inmate is in charge of the institution (or in Russia's case the gulags)...

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
1.2.4  Nerm_L  replied to  Dismayed Patriot @1.2.1    one month ago
Did you rewrite that Russian propaganda into your own words or just cut and paste it from RT?

Ukraine was under a corrupt leader who was stealing the nations wealth and allying with Russian oligarchs and Putin before the people had enough and toppled the treasonous criminal Poroshenko. Your sorry bullshit version of events is clearly scraped from the gutter that is the FSB propaganda wing.

Fuck Russian propaganda and any useless piece of shit traitor who disseminates it. Taking Russia's side after their unwarranted and unprovoked attack on Ukraine and defending Putin and his crimes is inexcusable. Those who do so have the blood of innocent civilians on their hands and should be ashamed, but clearly such worthless losers have no shame.

Still doesn't explain why Ukraine is important to the United States.  The United States has been supporting open warfare in Ukraine for seven years.  Why?

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Sophomore Principal
1.2.5  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Nerm_L @1.2.4    one month ago

The West’s ability or inability to hold Russia accountable will be a decisive factor in shaping the global political and economic order in the decade ahead.  It also send China a signal about Taiwan.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Sophomore Principal
1.2.6  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  shona1 @1.2.3    one month ago

Hello shona. I believe that the West must make sure that Putin’s illegal, unjustified aggression does not pay, and that will deter others from using force in similar ways. 

 
 
 
shona1
Junior Participates
1.2.7  shona1  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @1.2.6    one month ago

Morning drinker... absolutely and I am with Ukraine all the way...

When you look at WW1 and WW2 history has a nasty habit of repeating itself..

Putin wants his Empire back..but if 40 odd countries have anything to do with it he won't..

I am more than happy to buy a bullet for the maggot with his name on it..

Can recommend the website: Sign my rocket that is running at the moment..

Can sponsor a rocket, shells etc with a message the Ukrainians write on it..from Australia with love has a nice ring to it..

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Sophomore Principal
1.2.8  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  shona1 @1.2.7    one month ago
Can recommend the website: Sign my rocket that is running at the moment..

What an innovative idea, thanks for the tip.  Just left the site and hope to see my 155 mm shell, “From Virginia with loathing” fired to celebrate the New Year.

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
1.2.9  Nerm_L  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @1.2.5    one month ago
The West’s ability or inability to hold Russia accountable will be a decisive factor in shaping the global political and economic order in the decade ahead.  It also send China a signal about Taiwan.

Didn't Obama impose sanctions in 2014 for the annexation of Crimea?  The West's ability or inability to hold Russia accountable has been on display for eight years.  No doubt China has been watching.

Maybe that explains why the United States has been hampered in responding to crisis after crisis.  The global supply chain doesn't seem to worry about what the United States might do.  The money keeps flowing no matter what happens.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
1.2.10  Tessylo  replied to  Dismayed Patriot @1.2.1    one month ago

jrSmiley_81_smiley_image.gif a dozen times

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.3  devangelical  replied to  Vic Eldred @1    one month ago

whatever it costs to put anti-democracy authoritarians in the dirt is worth it...

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
2  seeder  Vic Eldred    one month ago

The war is far from over and I'm sure Zelensky will try and retake the Crimea.

Fkjr20XWYAATD85?format=jpg&name=small

Meanwhile, democrats are calling it their own.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
3  seeder  Vic Eldred    one month ago

ZELESNKYY: "What's going to happen after Patriot [missile systems] are installed? After that, we will send another signal to President Biden that we would like to get more Patriots. We are in war. I'm sorry — I'm really sorry."

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
3.1  Ronin2  replied to  Vic Eldred @3    one month ago

One of the few times I wish I was POTUS.

"Here is the running tab of what you owe the US Mr Zelenskyy. We will keep adding to it so long as you agree that every last cent will be paid back with interest. We believe a 10% rate should be appropriate; and take into account the inflation these billions we are sending out is causing. As a rider any US weapons systems, armaments, missiles, etc that make their way into Russian or Chinese hands will result in the automatic cutoff of all funding to Ukraine; and immediate payment due. There will be no talk of rebuilding Ukraine until all debt to the US is repaid from this war."

"Now Mr Zelenskyy; what was that you were stating about conditions for negotiating with Russia? I am sure the US taxpayers are very interested on how long you think they should be supporting this war?"

"You want your flag back? I am sorry, you will have to talk to Pelosi and Schumer. I am sure they are not wiping their asses with it; like they seem to be with ours."

  

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
3.1.1  seeder  Vic Eldred  replied to  Ronin2 @3.1    one month ago

In other words: We are sorry too, but we want our money and interest back.

Israel has no trouble paying us.

 
 
 
dennissmith
Freshman Silent
3.1.2  dennissmith  replied to  Ronin2 @3.1    one month ago

Zelensky is giving the US the middle finger just as Putin does.

 
 
 
dennissmith
Freshman Silent
3.2  dennissmith  replied to  Vic Eldred @3    one month ago

Zelensky makes demands of the US and Biden kisses his ass. 

Ukraine is not a NATO country. This is a European problem but Biden has made it an American problem

 
 
 
afrayedknot
Sophomore Quiet
3.2.1  afrayedknot  replied to  dennissmith @3.2    one month ago

“This is a European problem…”

No, this is a freedom problem. A sovereign country invaded by a hostile force. Which side do you choose?

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Sophomore Principal
3.2.2  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  dennissmith @3.2    one month ago

Did you think the same about Churchill?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Guide
3.2.3  Greg Jones  replied to  dennissmith @3.2    one month ago

World War 2 was also a European problem....to begin with.

Many parallels with the Lend-Lease program then and what Zelensky is asking for now..

 
 
 
dennissmith
Freshman Silent
3.2.4  dennissmith  replied to  afrayedknot @3.2.1    one month ago

Many countries have freedom problems and we do not get involved. What makes this any different?

 
 
 
dennissmith
Freshman Silent
3.2.5  dennissmith  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @3.2.2    one month ago

What does Churchill have to do with this?

 
 
 
dennissmith
Freshman Silent
3.2.6  dennissmith  replied to  Greg Jones @3.2.3    one month ago

Are you really comparing Putin to Hitler?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Guide
3.2.7  Greg Jones  replied to  dennissmith @3.2.6    one month ago

Striking similarities between them actions and philosophies. Cartoon was labeled "A Wise Investment".

bg122222dAPC-500x310.jpg

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
3.2.8  Tessylo  replied to  afrayedknot @3.2.1    one month ago

The side of the invasion by a hostile force?

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
4  seeder  Vic Eldred    one month ago

Putin had a swift response:

"Russia on Wednesday announced an ambitious plan to beef up its military from 1 million to 1.5 million and create multiple new units, an attempt to bolster the forces that have lost momentum and many soldiers in the war in Ukraine.

Russia’s military chief cited NATO’s plans to incorporate Finland and Sweden as a factor in the buildup. Here is a glance at Moscow’s military plans.

A PUSH FOR A BIGGER FORCE

Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu declared Wednesday that the country needs a force of 1.5 million “to guarantee the fulfillment of tasks to ensure Russia’s security.” He did not say when the military will reach that size.

The Russian military currently has about 1 million soldiers, compared with China’s force of 2 million and the U.S. force of about 1.4 million. India also has more than 1.4 million soldiers.

The Kremlin previously considered the size of its military as sufficient, but the calculus changed after hopes for a quick victory over its neighbor were shattered by fierce Ukrainian resistance.

Amid the war, Russia and Ukraine both have kept a tight lid of secrecy on their military casualties. The Russian military last reported its combat losses in September, when it said 5,937 troops were killed, but the West had much higher estimates. Earlier this week, U.K. Defense Secretary Ben Wallace said 100,000 Russian troops were dead, wounded or had deserted since the invasion began.

In August, Putin ordered an increase in the size of the Russian military to 1.15 million starting on Jan. 1. And in September, he ordered  the mobilization of 300,000 reservists  to beef up his forces in Ukraine. That number is counted as part of the military's current strength.

While Putin said there was no need to round up more, his mobilization decree is open-ended, allowing the military to call up additional reservists when needed. Putin’s decree also banned volunteer soldiers from ending their contracts.

The mobilization came on top of the regular draft, which calls up 120,000 to 140,000 men twice a year for a one-year tour of compulsory service.

EMPHASIS ON VOLUNTEERS

The Defense Ministry has claimed that it relies exclusively on volunteers in Ukraine and doesn’t engage draftees in the fighting. The Russian military had about 400,000 contract soldiers, including about 150,000 in the ground forces, before it rolled into Ukraine.

Shoigu said the expanded Russian military will include 695,000 volunteer contract soldiers, 521,000 of whom should be in the ranks by the end of 2023.

All Russian men ages 18 to 27 are obliged to serve in the military for one year, but many use college deferments and health exemptions to avoid the draft. Shoigu said the draft age range will be changed to 21 to 30, and recruits will be offered a choice between serving for one year as draftees or signing a contract with the military as volunteers.

Human rights activists have reported multiple cases in which draftees were forced to sign contracts to serve as volunteers, and Shoigu’s statement appears to signal that the practice could be expanded.

While some young conscripts have been coerced into signing up as volunteers, many Russian men, particularly those who live in the economically struggling parts of the country, sign up for duty to get a decent salary. In addition to the military wage, authorities also promised them extra payments for taking part in combat and bonuses.

Putin promised that those who are mobilized will get a monthly wage of at least 195,000 rubles (about $2,800), about five times higher than Russia's average salary. Some regional authorities promised to top that with their own bonuses.

Families of soldiers killed in action in Ukraine are entitled to various state-mandated compensations that in total could surpass 12 million rubles (over $170,000).

Despite the payments and other perks, Putin’s mobilization order prompted hundreds of thousands to flee abroad to avoid the call-up, and the military has struggled to procure enough supplies for those who were rounded up.

But authorities' concerns that the mobilization could fuel broad discontent haven't materialized, and sporadic protests across Russia have failed to gain momentum. Many military experts say that Russia could call up bigger numbers, and some predicted that a new wave of mobilization could begin early next year.

RESHAPING MILITARY STRUCTURE

Shoigu outlined plans to form new military units and groups of forces in western Russia, including an army corps to be deployed to the northwestern region of Karelia near Finland.

The plans marked a return to the Soviet-era military structure, which Russia abandoned during recent military reforms that saw the creation of smaller, more mobile units.

Some Russian military experts have argued that such smaller units intended for use in local conflicts were undermanned and underequipped for massive fighting like the action in Ukraine.

Shoigu declared that the existing infantry, airborne and marine brigades will be reshaped into divisions, the bigger units that Russia had in the past and that the U.S. and some NATO allies still have. He also announced that several new divisions will be formed.

As part of a planned reform, some air force units will be made subordinate to groups of land forces in an apparent bid to increase coordination between them that many observers said proved insufficient during the fighting in Ukraine.

FILLING THE GAPS

In a speech given Wednesday before top military brass, Russian President Vladimir Putin emphasized the need to use the lessons learned during the fighting to modernize the armed forces.

He specifically underlined the importance of enhancing communications and improving artillery tactics. Some Russian military bloggers lamented that coordination between units has often been poor, and it has taken commanders too long to designate and clear targets for artillery and rocket strikes.

Putin also emphasized the need to widen the use of drones, noting that they have played a big role in the conflict.

The Russian president promised that the military industries will increase weapons production, saying they can do so without stretching the country’s resources and damaging the economy.

NUCLEAR FORCES PRIORITIZED

Putin also vowed Wednesday to put special emphasis on modernizing Russia's nuclear forces, which he described as “the main guarantee of our sovereignty and territorial integrity, strategic parity and the global balance of forces.”

He said that the new Sarmat intercontinental ballistic missile will enter service shortly. The Sarmat is intended to replace aging Soviet-built ballistic missiles and form the core of Russia’s nuclear forces, and Putin has hailed its capability to dodge any missile defenses.

Putin added that Russia will deploy more hypersonic weapons, noting that the first warship equipped with state-of-the-art Zircon hypersonic missiles will be commissioned by the navy next month."



 
 
 
Hallux
Junior Principal
4.1  Hallux  replied to  Vic Eldred @4    one month ago
Putin had a swift response:

Another one? My head is spinning at how many jokers he's holding ... /S

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Guide
5  Greg Jones    one month ago

Nonsense...Russia can't equip, train, feed, or lead the troops they have now, let alone the conscripts who desert in droves.

There is no morale left in most of them, and their generals and officers are incompetent fools. Most young Russians don't share the ideology of the old guardl

They simply have become cannon fodder for a lost cause. No one should believe Putin's lies and puffery.

 
 
 
independent Liberal
Freshman Quiet
6  independent Liberal    one month ago

Neocons being neocons.

 
 

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