Some white people don’t want to hear about slavery at plantations built by slaves

  
Via:  john-russell  •  3 weeks ago  •  38 comments

Some white people don’t want to hear about slavery at plantations built by slaves
“Would not recommend. Tour was all about how hard it was for the slaves,” wrote one reviewer of the Whitney Plantation in Louisiana.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



Some white people don’t want to hear about slavery at plantations built by slaves


AUGUST 07, 2019

YFJ6IQB5PRHIRBX2CNFUDK26VQ.jpg

“It was just not what we expected.”

“I was depressed by the time I left.”

“ … the tour was more of a scolding of the old South.”

“The brief mentions of the former owners were defamatory.”

“Would not recommend.”

These are a few of the apparently negative reviews posted online about guided tours of Southern plantations, some of which went viral Thursday after former Colorado congressional candidate Saira Rao tweeted a screenshot of one.

This is how decent white people who tell the truth about slavery on plantations are reviewed by white people.  pic.twitter.com/xiomBzPpWl

Approximately 12.5 million human beings were kidnapped from their homes in Africa and shipped to the New World from 1514 to 1866, according to historian Henry Louis Gates Jr . One in eight died en route. Most were sent to South America. In 1860, the Census counted approximately 4 million enslaved people in the United States, according to  PolitiFact .

“Would not recommend. Tour was all about how hard it was for the slaves,”  wrote  one reviewer of the Whitney Plantation in Louisiana.

Slaves who lived on plantations typically worked 10-16 hours a day, six days a week, according to the University of Houston’s  Digital History . Children as young as 3 were put to work.

“I was depressed by the time I left and questioned why anyone would want to live in South Carolina,” read one review  posted to Twitter  about the McLeod Plantation in Charleston.

In 1860, 402,406 people were living in South Carolina not because they wanted to, but because they were enslaved. They made up 57 percent of the state’s population, according to  census data .

“I felt [the African American tour guide] embellished her presentation and was racist towards me as a white person,” another McLeod visitor  wrote .

In 1993, historian Clarence J. Munford  estimated the value  of the labor performed by black slaves in the United States between 1619 and 1865, compounded with 6 percent interest, to be $97.1 trillion. In today’s dollars, without further compound interest added, that would be $172 trillion.

“Our guide Olivia offered a heavy bias with only the hand-picked facts that neatly fit her narrative and for a large part weren’t germane to a plantation tour,” one person said of the McLeod Plantation, according to a review  posted to Twitter , before following up with the racist comment, “I found it amusing when she told us some freed slaves fled to northern cities like Baltimore and Detroit where they continued to thrive to this day!”

As many as 100,000 people escaped slavery on the Underground Railroad, according to historian  James A. Banks .

“There is really nothing good you can say about slavery but I felt [the tour guide] took it too far. His information is correct but I think he left off part of the story,” one  review read .

This month,  Virginia will commemorate  the arrival of the first enslaved Africans in 1619, which ushered in 246 years of brutal subjugation for millions of men, women and children. One of those slaves was named Angela.

“If you’re looking to visit a traditional plantation, look elsewhere,”  one review read .

Many plantations, including George Washington’s Mount Vernon and Thomas Jefferson’s  Monticello , are working to present a more accurate image of what life was like for slaves and slave owners.

For those who may prefer a fuzzier, less accurate portrayal of plantation life, “Gone with the Wind” is streaming on  Amazon  and  iTunes  for $3.99 — a low price but still higher than the average slave’s wage, which was $0.

Tags

jrDiscussion - desc
smarty_function_ntUser_is_admin: user_id parameter required
Find text within the comments Find 
 
JohnRussell
1  seeder  JohnRussell    3 weeks ago

The tourists want to see this

tara-staircase.jpg

Inspiration-for-Twelve-Oaks-Plantation-G

 
 
 
Ed-NavDoc
2  Ed-NavDoc    3 weeks ago

While the story of slavery in this country needs to told, it should be in a solely historical context. It is the shared history of this country for good or bad. But it does no good for some to go out of their way to make others feel guilty over what their ancestors may or may not have done a century or more ago.

 
 
 
It Is ME
3  It Is ME    3 weeks ago

Nice house !

Just what my Wife and I have been looking for !

Porch in the Front, and Probably a Porch in the Back.

Could Use a door or two though.

Just needs a running Stream Close by !

384

 
 
 
Ronin2
4  Ronin2    3 weeks ago
“I was depressed by the time I left and questioned why anyone would want to live in South Carolina,” read one review  posted to Twitter  about the McLeod Plantation in Charleston.

I love this one. How was the person supposed to feel? Happy, over joyed, elated? Imagine the lefts' looney toon reaction to that? Also, taken in context the person was referring to the history of the state as to the 'why would anyone want to live in South'.  Who would want to live in a state with such a terrible history?

 
 
 
katrix
4.1  katrix  replied to  Ronin2 @4    3 weeks ago
Who would want to live in a state with such a terrible history?

There probably aren't many states - or countries - anyone would want to live in, if history is what we went by.

 
 
 
katrix
5  katrix    3 weeks ago

Slavery is the only reason plantations were possible. I wouldn't expect a plantation tour NOT to point that out; they are integrally entwined.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
5.1  XDm9mm  replied to  katrix @5    3 weeks ago
Slavery is the only reason plantations were possible. I wouldn't expect a plantation tour NOT to point that out; they are integrally entwined.

Very true.  But when they describe slavery, they neglect to mention who sold those slaves to the slave traders.  One can only surmise that's a bit of history some would like to hide and forget.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
5.1.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  XDm9mm @5.1    3 weeks ago

My experience has been that only racists constantly bring up the issue of "who sold

the Africans to the slave traders? "   They are the only ones who think it is relevant. 

 
 
 
MUVA
5.1.2  MUVA  replied to  JohnRussell @5.1.1    3 weeks ago

My experience as a minority is when white people try to hard to appear down for the struggle they over compensating for some thing maybe past deeds.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
5.1.3  XDm9mm  replied to  JohnRussell @5.1.1    3 weeks ago
My experience has been that only racists constantly bring up the issue of "who sold the Africans to the slave traders? "

My experience is that only the racists continually brand as racist those that they don't know or agree with.  Sound like anyone you know John?

 
 
 
JohnRussell
5.1.4  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  XDm9mm @5.1.3    3 weeks ago

People are known by what they say. People who think that Africans are as guilty of slavery in the southern U.S. as the southern slaveowners were doesnt know what they are talking about. 

I've never known someone who blames slavery on the Africans who wasnt a racist. The thought processes go together. 

 
 
 
XDm9mm
5.1.5  XDm9mm  replied to  JohnRussell @5.1.4    3 weeks ago
I've never known someone who blames slavery on the Africans who wasnt a racist

And you double down.  You don't know me, but I know history.  Maybe you should learn some yourself instead of continually trying to blame all the ills of the country and the world on the american white male.

 
 
 
bugsy
5.1.6  bugsy  replied to  JohnRussell @5.1.4    2 weeks ago
People who think that Africans are as guilty of slavery in the southern U.S.

If Africans did not war against other tribes and take members of the losing side as slaves to sell to, first the Dutch, then democrats of the southern US, then maybe we would never have had a slave market in the US in the first place.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
5.1.7  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  XDm9mm @5.1.5    2 weeks ago

If you want to see some history about slavery, I'll accomodate you, but I dont think you will like it. 

The vice president of the Confederate States of America made a speech where he pronounced their new country to be the first nation in human history to be founded on the principle of white supremacy. exact words. 

It doesnt matter if some Africans sold other Africans into slavery. It is immaterial to what happened in this country. If someone takes a gun and uses it to murder another person, do we blame the one who sold him the gun? You right wingers would lose your shit if that was the case. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
5.1.8  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  bugsy @5.1.6    2 weeks ago
If Africans did not war against other tribes and take members of the losing side as slaves to sell to, first the Dutch, then democrats of the southern US, then maybe we would never have had a slave market in the US in the first place.

I sincerely hope that isnt the best argument you can come up with. 

 
 
 
bugsy
5.1.9  bugsy  replied to  JohnRussell @5.1.8    2 weeks ago
I sincerely hope that isnt the best argument you can come up with. 

Simply pointed out a possibility that cannot be denied.

 
 
 
Tacos!
6  Tacos!    3 weeks ago

There is probably some reasonable line where history is presented in a way that's interesting and comprehensive, but if the presenter is going on some kind of rant, it may not be appropriate. I really doubt most people who are signing up for the tour endorse slavery, so it's probably not necessary to preach or be angry at them. It sounds like some people walked away with the feeling that that's what was happening.

 
 
 
Dismayed Patriot
7  Dismayed Patriot    3 weeks ago
“There is really nothing good you can say about slavery but I felt [the tour guide] took it too far. His information is correct but I think he left off part of the story,”

He left out the part of the story that describes how well the plantation owners lived, how well respected they were among other slave owners. How they took pride in having the biggest and strongest slaves and often were instrumental in breeding the strongest males with the strongest females to increase their profit potential. He likely left out all the plantation owners racist reasoning for why blacks had to be kept enslaved and why they would violently punish anyone attempting to teach a slave to read and write, or how they would organize hunting parties to chase down escaped slaves. And in their anger over the suggestion that they should give up their slaves, they attacked federal troops which led to the deaths of over 360,000 good Union soldiers along with 258,000 of their own treasonous confederate soldiers.

There really wasn't anything to admire that came from those plantation owners so there really isn't much more of the story to tell if you're touring a plantation. If you are offended by facts and reality, then perhaps don't take the tour. If I was offended or didn't want to hear the horrid details of the holocaust, I likely wouldn't visit a holocaust museum or take a tour of Auschwitz. But for me, I'd rather hear the historical details and contemplate the lasting effects of such a tragedy, whether it's hearing about slave owners or Nazis. I happen to be a white male, but I feel no connection to either of those groups so I don't feel any desire to defend them or try and obfuscate the truth about them in any way.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
7.1  XDm9mm  replied to  Dismayed Patriot @7    3 weeks ago
If you are offended by facts and reality,

Then it would behoove the tour guide to delve a little deeper into exactly who sold those slaves to the traders to begin with.

 
 
 
Dismayed Patriot
7.1.1  Dismayed Patriot  replied to  XDm9mm @7.1    3 weeks ago
Then it would behoove the tour guide to delve a little deeper into exactly who sold those slaves to the traders to begin with.

Does the fact that it was often black African tribal leaders and war lords that sold their captives to the white traders make slavery in America or the slave trade in general any less egregious?

 
 
 
bugsy
7.1.2  bugsy  replied to  Dismayed Patriot @7.1.1    2 weeks ago
Does the fact that it was often black African tribal leaders and war lords that sold their captives to the white traders make slavery in America or the slave trade in general any less egregious?

Maybe not, but if those tribal leaders did not sell their captives to the democrat southern whites, then maybe a slave trade would never had been established.

 
 
 
katrix
7.1.3  katrix  replied to  bugsy @7.1.2    2 weeks ago

Perhaps you should learn history rather than just trying to slam democrats. The slave trade was established by Eastern Europeans.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
7.1.4  Raven Wing  replied to  bugsy @7.1.2    2 weeks ago
did not sell their captives to the democrat southern whites

Oh stuff your party BS and get the story straight if you're going to try and comment on the slave trades and owners.

It wasn't just "Democrat Southern whites" that bought the slaves either. There were many other people and organizations, businesses, slave traders, not all of whom were whites, and plantation owners who were not Democrats, who bought them as well.

Learn some American history before you start to point your political BS.

 
 
 
1stwarrior
7.1.5  1stwarrior  replied to  Raven Wing @7.1.4    2 weeks ago

And don't forget Ohio before the Civil War.

http://slavenorth.com/ohio.htm

Ohio was one of the states that prohibited blacks from testifying in legal cases involving white people. When that ban was lifted as part of the Free Soil-Democratic compromise of 1849, observers nonetheless acknowledged that, in the southern part of the state, where most of the blacks lived and where prejudice ran strongest, social forces would keep the ban in practical effect.

As for the brief victories of the Free Soilers, by 1854, the state government was back to its old ways, and it expelled a black reporter from a freedman's newspaper from the Senate press galley because his presence there violated "the laws of nature and the moral and political well-being of both races."[5]

When the Republicans arose as the Northern political party, in Ohio as in Pennsylvania they kept their distance from abolitionists and blacks to assure their success. "The 'negro question,' " one state leader of the party wrote as Lincoln's election approached, "as we understand it, is a white man's question, the question of the right of free white laborers to the soil of the territories. It is not to be crushed or retarded by shouting 'Sambo' at us. We have no Sambo in our platform. ... We object to Sambo. We don't want him about. We insist that he shall not be forced upon us. "

 
 
 
bugsy
7.1.6  bugsy  replied to  katrix @7.1.3    2 weeks ago

Never said where it was originated. I pointed out the fact that southern democrats were the ones to purchase said African captured human beings as their own. To this day I never understood why African Americans overwhelmingly vote democrat.

 
 
 
bugsy
7.1.7  bugsy  replied to  Raven Wing @7.1.4    2 weeks ago
before you start to point your political BS.

Never pointed to politics. I simply pointed out that whites that HAPPENED to vote democrat were the vast majority of who purchased captured Africans

Maybe the history you "learned" is flawed.

 
 
 
Citizen Kane-473667
7.1.8  Citizen Kane-473667  replied to  katrix @7.1.3    2 weeks ago
The slave trade was established by Eastern Europeans.

Hardly.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
8  XDm9mm    3 weeks ago
If you are offended by facts and reality,

Then it would behoove the tour guide to delve a little deeper into exactly who sold those slaves to the traders to begin with.

The Atlantic slave trade or transatlantic slave trade involved the transportation by slave traders of enslaved African people, mainly to the Americas . The slave trade regularly used the triangular trade route and its Middle Passage , and existed from the 16th to the 19th centuries. The vast majority of those who were enslaved and transported in the transatlantic slave trade were people from Central and West Africa , who had been sold by other West Africans to Western European slave traders (with a small number being captured directly by the slave traders in coastal raids), who brought them to the Americas. [1] The South Atlantic and Caribbean economies were particularly dependent on the supply of slave labour for the production of commodity crops, making goods and clothing to sell in Europe. This was crucial to those Western European countries which, in the late 17th and 18th centuries, were vying with each other to create overseas empires. [2]

The Portuguese, in the 16th century, were the first to engage in the Atlantic slave trade. In 1526, they completed the first transatlantic slave voyage to Brazil , and other Europeans soon followed. [3] Shipowners regarded the slaves as cargo to be transported to the Americas as quickly and cheaply as possible, [2] there to be sold to work on coffee, tobacco, cocoa, sugar and cotton plantations , gold and silver mines, rice fields, the construction industry, cutting timber for ships, in skilled labour, and as domestic servants. While the first Africans kidnapped to the English colonies were classified as indentured servants , with a similar legal standing as contract-based workers coming from Britain and Ireland, by the middle of the 17th century, slavery had hardened as a racial caste, with African slaves and their offspring being legally the property of their owners, and children born to slave mothers were also slaves. As property, the people were considered merchandise or units of labour, and were sold at markets with other goods and services.

The major Atlantic slave trading nations, ordered by trade volume, were: the Portuguese , the British , the French , the Spanish , and the Dutch Empires . Several had established outposts on the African coast where they purchased slaves from local African leaders. [4] These slaves were managed by a  factor who was established on or near the coast to expedite the shipping of slaves to the New World. Slaves were kept in a  factory while awaiting shipment. Current estimates are that about 12 million to 12.8 million Africans were shipped across the Atlantic over a span of 400 years, [5] [6] : 194 although the number purchased by the traders was considerably higher, as the passage had a high death rate. [7] [8] Near the beginning of the 19th century, various governments acted to ban the trade, although illegal smuggling still occurred. In the early 21st century, several governments issued apologies for the transatlantic slave trade.

Source:  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_slave_trade#targetText=The%20vast%20majority%20of%20those,brought%20them%20to%20the%20Americas." > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantic_slave_trade#targetText=The%20vast%20majority%20of%20those,brought%20them%20to%20the%20Americas.

And then there is this to ponder:

How Many Slaves Landed in the U.S.?

by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. | Originally posted on The Root

.........

And how many of these 10.7 million Africans were shipped directly to North America?  Only about 388,000.  That’s right: a tiny percentage.

Source:  https://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/history/how-many-slaves-landed-in-the-us/

When it comes to slavery there's plenty of guilt to go around, from West and Central African natives selling their country men and women into slavery, to the traders to the ultimate buyers.   It was not all predicated on some plantations in the south.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
8.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  XDm9mm @8    3 weeks ago
And how many of these 10.7 million Africans were shipped directly to North America?  Only about 388,000.  That’s right: a tiny percentage. Source:  https://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/history/how-many-slaves-landed-in-the-us/

It's hard to see how you think that fact is helpful to the white southern slaveowners.  When slaves were born in Africa, you could twist reality around and say it is the fault of their fellow Africans. When the vast majority of the slaves are born in the U.S. and made slaves from birth by the white plantation owners, who you gonna blame it on? 

 
 
 
XDm9mm
8.1.1  XDm9mm  replied to  JohnRussell @8.1    3 weeks ago
white plantation owners, who you gonna blame it on?

The plantation owners, including the black ones.

See how easy that was?

 
 
 
XDm9mm
8.1.2  XDm9mm  replied to  JohnRussell @8.1    3 weeks ago
It's hard to see how you think that fact is helpful to the white southern slaveowners.

It's not.  they're dead and need no help.  And not slave owners were white.

And here's something to really give you a wedgie...   Henry Louis Gates is a Black Professor.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
8.1.3  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  XDm9mm @8.1.1    3 weeks ago

It doesn't matter what the color of a handful of the slaveowners was, what matters is what color the slaves were. 

On May 10, 1740, the South Carolina Assembly enacted the “Bill for the better ordering and governing of Negroes and other slaves in this province,” also known as the Negro Act of 1740. The law prohibited enslaved African people from growing their own food, learning to read, moving freely, assembling in groups, or earning money. It also authorized white owners to whip and kill enslaved Africans for being "rebellious."

South Carolina implemented this act after the unsuccessful Stono Rebellion in 1739, in which approximately fifty enslaved black people resisted bondage and waged an uprising that killed between twenty and twenty-five white people. In addition to establishing a racial caste and property system in the colony, the assembly sought to prevent any additional rebellions by including provisions that mandated a ratio of one white person for every ten enslaved people on a plantation. The Negro Act rendered enslaved Africans human chattel and revoked all forms of civil rights.

The law served as a model for other states; Georgia authorized slavery within its borders in 1750 and enacted its own slave code five years later.
https://calendar.eji.org/racial-injustice/may/10
 
 
 
JohnRussell
8.1.4  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  XDm9mm @8.1.2    3 weeks ago
And not slave owners were white.

You were right on top of this one.  1/16th of one percent of african slaves in america were owned by other blacks, or if you like, six out of a thousand. 

 
 
 
Kavika
9  Kavika     3 weeks ago

I've toured some of the ''Plantations'' around Chaleston SC. IMO, visiting the ''Old Slave Market Museum'' on Chalmers St. in Charleston is a much more authentic portrayal of the slave trade.

 
 
 
XDm9mm
9.1  XDm9mm  replied to  Kavika @9    3 weeks ago

I've also toured several plantations, and was essentially appalled at the conditions they survived in.

If you've never been to 'downtown' Fredericksburg VA, you should go.  A ton of very interesting things, and a number of sad things also.  Where slaves being traded were held prior to being sold is still standing, and right in the center of town is the stone they were chained to while being auctioned.  It's very sobering to say the least.  One wonder how people could do that to other people, but they were different times I guess.

 
 
 
Kavika
9.1.1  Kavika   replied to  XDm9mm @9.1    3 weeks ago

I've been there as well. The ''Old Slave Market'' in Charleston is the original place of sale of slaves in SC. If I remember correctly around 50% of all slaves were brought in through Charleston. 

 
 
 
Raven Wing
9.2  Raven Wing  replied to  Kavika @9    2 weeks ago
IMO, visiting the ''Old Slave Market Museum'' on Chalmers St. in Charleston is a much more authentic portrayal of the slave trade.

Yes it is, and it would do some here to learn more about the real history for the slave trade before they make themselves look....eh... less learned on the subject. 

 
 
 
Citizen Kane-473667
10  Citizen Kane-473667    3 weeks ago

[deleted]

 
 
Loading...
Loading...

Who is online

JBB
Ender
igknorantzrulz
CB
dave-2693993


42 visitors