Red-bellied piranha discovered in BC lake by angler

  
Via:  buzz-of-the-orient  •  3 weeks ago  •  19 comments

Red-bellied piranha discovered in BC lake by angler

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


Red-bellied piranha discovered in BC lake by angler

by Megan Trudeau, KamloopsBCNOW, September 28 2019

A fisherman reeled in quite the surprise this week while out on Westwood Lake near Nanaimo [British Columbia, Canada].

According to the Conservation Officer Service (COS), a red-bellied piranha was caught in the lake.

pirahna.jpg

Piranha are tropical fish that are not able to survive in our winter climate, however it is a popular aquarium fish.

Conservation officers said that this was likely a case of an unwanted pet being released into the lake.

It’s also not the first time this year that someone has caught a piranha in the same lake. Another piranha was caught earlier this summer.

The COS would like to remind the public that introducing an aquatic invasive species can have harmful impacts, including threatening native fish, ecosystems and other species.

It is also illegal, and a conviction for a first offence of the movement of aquatic invasive species could net a fine of up to $100,000 and/or a prison term of up to one year.

If you suspect your catch is a new introduction, or if you have any information on this incident, please call the Report All Poachers and Polluters (RAPP) hotline at 1-877-952-7277 (RAPP).

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Buzz of the Orient
1  seeder  Buzz of the Orient    3 weeks ago

Wait a second.  Piranha have feelings too.  They need to be fed, so who volunteers to go swimming in that lake?

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
2  seeder  Buzz of the Orient    3 weeks ago

For the information of you Americans, 2.54 centimeters equals one inch, so the fish is only about 9 inches long, but then even a small piranha can be pretty vicious and tear your skin off.  You can be especially concerned if you ever saw this movie:

1140925_160129130241_101_2940.JPG

 
 
 
Split Personality
3  Split Personality    3 weeks ago

Catching 2 in the same Northern lake is cause for some concern,  but they are not dangerous unless they are hungry and in very large groups.

In an aquarium with similarly sized rough fish like Chichlids &Oscars they are timid.

Similarly if they get large enough, they will ignore guppies, tetras, neons, tiger Barbs and zebra danios which are too small and too fast to catch.

Aquarium piranhas quickly learn who feeds them what - they will eat anything ie, beef, pork, chicken etc,

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
4  Vic Eldred    3 weeks ago

Another asshole who released a non-native species into a lake!

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
4.1  seeder  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Vic Eldred @4    3 weeks ago

Yeah, the perfect example of that is when someone released rabbits in Australia, where there were no natural predators for them.

 
 
 
Kavika
4.1.1  Kavika   replied to  Buzz of the Orient @4.1    3 weeks ago

And fox, cats, and cane toads.

In the US the Everglades are being overrun and the natural inhabitants are being killed off at an alarming rate by the Burmese python. Add to that snakehead fish, Asian carp etc etc. 

Some people and governments are fucking idiots.  

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
4.1.2  Vic Eldred  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @4.1    3 weeks ago

Textbook  example. We learned about that one as children. Last year when I was in Florida I learned about the Melaleuca tree. Florida spends large amounts of money and resources each year to remove them. Believe it or not they were introduced long ago in a deliberate attempt to destroy the Everglades. It was introduced by Citrus growers who wanted to develop the area and dry out the "swamp", which these trees do. Today they burn them a little at a time.

 
 
 
Split Personality
4.1.3  Split Personality  replied to  Vic Eldred @4.1.2    3 weeks ago

In California they used Eucalyptus around the SF Bay area to dry out the swamps and lowlands all around the bay.

Had the Japanese ever attacked San Francisco or Marin County, all of the gun emplacements were marked by

Eucalyptus trees. The Presidio and Angels island are covered with them as were the hills of residential neighborhoods in

Oakland where the burning Eucalyptus trees were exploding into little sailing leaves coated with their burning sap during the great Oakland firestorm of 1991

Thank you John McLaren & the City of SF for that one.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
4.1.4  Vic Eldred  replied to  Split Personality @4.1.3    3 weeks ago

We have come to value national treasures like the Bay area & the Everglades. It is something the nation is unified about.

 
 
 
Krishna
5  Krishna    3 weeks ago

Some invasive species have been introduced with good intentions-- but with a lack of knowledge. Sometimes when there's excessive growth of some noxious plant that is a real problem, scientists find a predator to introduce that will control it. But occasionally the predator will also kill off desirable species as well-- or have other really bad traits.

And the same goes for introducing predators in an attempt to control undesitrable animals--- sometimes other useful animals are attacked. 

And sometimes killing off what were thought to be harmful aanimals upsets an entire natural cycle.

 
 
 
Split Personality
5.1  Split Personality  replied to  Krishna @5    3 weeks ago

Throw a pebble in a still pond...

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
5.1.1  seeder  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Split Personality @5.1    3 weeks ago

A good analogy.  Disturb the environment and the "ripples" go far and wide.

 
 
 
Krishna
6  Krishna    3 weeks ago

Some invasive species have been introduced with good intentions-- but with a lack of knowledge.

For example, the deliberate introduction of some types of Asian Carp:

Invasion USA: Asian Carp Invaders Have Taken the Mississippi, Are the Great Lakes Next?

Introduced to control weeds and parasites in aquaculture, Asian carp have been crowding out native fish, compromising water quality and killing off sensitive species

Introduced in the southeast to help control weeds and parasites in aquaculture operations, these fish soon spread up the Mississippi River system where they have been crowding out native fish populations not used to competing with such aggressive invaders. 

Asian carp are hardy, lay hundreds of thousands of eggs at a time and spread into new habitat quickly and easily. To wit, they can jump over barriers such as low dams. 

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
6.1  seeder  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Krishna @6    3 weeks ago

At least carp can be used to make gefilte fish.

 
 
 
Krishna
6.1.1  Krishna  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @6.1    3 weeks ago
At least carp can be used to make gefilte fish

I wonder if they can use this kind of Carp?

Because there are plenty of them (too many!)

 
 
 
Krishna
7  Krishna    3 weeks ago

Midwest battles to keep invasive Asian carp out of the Great Lakes

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
7.1  seeder  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Krishna @7    3 weeks ago

I get a blank page - don't know what you posted.

 
 
 
Krishna
7.1.1  Krishna  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @7.1    3 weeks ago
Midwest battles to keep invasive Asian carp out of the Great Lakes

That's the title of the video I embeded (from YouTube). But there are other similar videos . You can search for something like "invasive species , Asian Carp, Great Lakes". They are large and aggressive....they can be seen jumping pretty high...in the rivers...

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
7.1.2  seeder  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Krishna @7.1.1    3 weeks ago
"Midwest battles to keep invasive Asian carp out of the Great Lakes"

I couldn't play the video, but I read the transcript from the PBS video here:

https://indianapublicmedia.org/news/midwest-battles-to-keep-invasive-asian-carp-out-of-the-great-lakes.php

 
 
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