Survivors return to Auschwitz 75 years after liberation

  
Via:  perrie-halpern  •  one month ago  •  21 comments

By:   Bill Neely, Kiko Itasaka and Patrick Smith

Survivors return to Auschwitz 75 years after liberation
"I would love Hitler should be alive to see what I accomplished — that I'm alive," said survivor David Marks, who now lives in Sherman, Connecticut.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


OSWIECIM, Poland — When more than 200 survivors of the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp gather there on Monday to mark 75 years since its liberation, many will do so for the last time.

Elderly survivors from the United States, Israel, Australia, South America, Russia, Slovenia and elsewhere were among presidents, prime ministers and royalty from across the globe at the ceremony in southern Poland, which was under Nazi occupation during World War II.

"In times like this when minorities have to feel vulnerable again, I can hope that everyone would stand up for democracy and human rights," she said.

Sally Jassy, born in Lodz, Poland, in 1926, survived both Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany and Auschwitz.

The event recalled the moment   Auschwitz   was liberated by the Soviet army on Jan. 27, 1945.

Polish President Andrzej Duda and the head of the World Jewish Congress, Ronald Lauder were, were both scheduled to lead a commemoration for the more than one million people murdered at Auschwitz, the vast majority of whom were Jewish.

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A delegation of survivors of the Auschwitz and their families arrive to lay wreaths at the camp's execution wall on Monday. Sean Gallup / Getty Images

"It’s been three generations since that day, the 27th of January 1945, when a few thousand prisoners, victims of cruelty, exhausted by slave-work, hunger and diseases, lived to see liberation by the soldiers of the Red Army," Duda said during his address.

Last week, world leaders gathered in Jerusalem for a   separate event to commemorate the Holocaust . Poland's Duda boycotted that event over a disagreement with Russia over Poland's role in triggering World War II.

“This is about survivors. It’s not about politics,” Lauder said Sunday as he went to the death camp with several survivors.

Lauder warned that leaders must do more to   fight anti-Semitism , including by passing new laws to combat it.

Many of the survivors lost parents and grandparents in Auschwitz or other Nazi death camps and some will be saying kaddish, the Jewish prayer for the dead — some alongside their own children, grandchildren and even great-grandchildren.

They described their experiences to the crowd of some 1,000, often in excruciating detail.

“My number was 45,554," said Bat-Sheva Dagan, who is originally from Lodz, Poland. "I did not have a striped uniform as there were too few. I was given a Russian soldier’s uniform. I had to wear it directly on my skin."

“They tattooed my number on my and and it’s just as visible today as it was back then. It was tattooed very well," the 94-year-old added.

Else Baker, a Roma survivor who taken to Auschwitz from Hamburg, Germany, at the age 8, was at an event to unveil a memorial to the Roma and Sinti victims of the camp.

"In times like this when minorities have to feel vulnerable again, I can hope that everyone would stand up for democracy and human rights," she said.

Sally Jassy, born in Lodz, Poland, in 1926, survived both Bergen-Belsen concentration camp in Germany and Auschwitz.

Now living in Queens, New York, she told NBC News she had returned to remember those who couldn't escape.

"Auschwitz to me is a cemetery, and I am going to honor my people," she told NBC News.

She explained what her message would be to her mother, who died in Auschwitz along with her father, brother, two sisters and dozens of cousins.

"I'd tell her, 'Ma, I want to tell you what I went through. And Ma please I love you, need your embrace, I you to touch me and kiss as you used to before."

David Marks, who now living in Sherman, Connecticut, and was back at Auschwitz for the first time, said he had a wish that involved the Nazi leader.

"I would love Hitler should be alive to see what I accomplished — that I'm alive," he said.

Bill Neely and Kiko Itasaka reported from Oswiecim, Poland. Patrick Smith reported from London.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Dean Moriarty
1  Dean Moriarty    one month ago

This is my friend Magda she was in the camp. She works out at my gym and is an amazing woman. 
https://www.vaildaily.com/news/vail-valley-holocaust-survivors-book-explains-how-to-live-through-tough-times/

 
 
 
JaneDoe
1.1  JaneDoe  replied to  Dean Moriarty @1    one month ago

Although I don’t know her I have to agree, she is an amazing woman!

SANCTUARY by Magda Herzberger

There is a free world of the spirit
Buried in the depths of the soul,
Where thoughts roam freely,
Where earthly barriers fall -
In this heavenly domain,
Mortal traits untouched remain -
In this mysterious realm,
Surrounded by beauty and calm,
The sparks of life live on and on,
Long after physical bodies are gone.

 
 
 
Dean Moriarty
1.1.1  Dean Moriarty  replied to  JaneDoe @1.1    one month ago

Yes here is a video where she describes some of what she went through. 

 
 
 
Sparty On
1.1.2  Sparty On  replied to  Dean Moriarty @1.1.1    one month ago

Thx for that Dean.    People like her never cease to amaze me.

 
 
 
JaneDoe
1.1.3  JaneDoe  replied to  Dean Moriarty @1.1.1    one month ago

Wow!! I can’t even imagine and when I try... It makes my heart hurt!

Thanks for sharing the link.

 
 
 
Sparty On
1.1.4  Sparty On  replied to  JaneDoe @1.1.3    one month ago

Like Chris Watts.  

I watched that special the other night and it made my heart ache as bad as it had in a long, long time.

Stuff like that and what the nazi's did here just reminds us that evil is alive and well in this world.

 
 
 
JaneDoe
1.1.5  JaneDoe  replied to  Sparty On @1.1.4    one month ago

I thought about watching that but I knew I couldn’t handle it. I can only hope he gets traded around for snicker bars the rest of his days!

 
 
 
Sparty On
1.1.6  Sparty On  replied to  JaneDoe @1.1.5    one month ago

Oh it was heart-wrenching ..... unbelievable what that guy did to his family ..... just like this, there are no words ....

 
 
 
Kathleen
1.1.7  Kathleen  replied to  Dean Moriarty @1.1.1    one month ago

She is a very strong woman indeed.

What those people have been through is unimaginable horror.  I always reserved a special place in my heart for them.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
1.2  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Dean Moriarty @1    one month ago

Dean,

She really lived an amazing life and it is so surprising to see her with such a positive outlook on life. Thanks for sharing.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
2  JohnRussell    one month ago

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
3  Vic Eldred    one month ago

"On International Holocaust Remembrance Day, we remember the millions of precious souls who perished as a result of the horrific crimes perpetrated by the Nazi regime.  We also reaffirm our steadfast commitment to confronting the vile poison of anti-Semitism wherever and whenever it arises.

This year’s annual observance of International Holocaust Remembrance Day is especially moving as we commemorate the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.  As we solemnly mourn those who were abused, tortured, or killed at Auschwitz and other concentration and extermination camps, we acknowledge the heroes who risked their own lives—many of whom made the ultimate sacrifice—to help liberate the camps.  Their sacrifices helped the forces of freedom prevail to ensure that these atrocious crimes will never be repeated.

Unfortunately, there are still Jewish men, women, and children who face persecution and discrimination today.  To fight the rise of anti-Semitism in the United States, I issued an Executive Order in December of 2019 that will help combat racist, anti-Semitic discrimination.  Anti-Semitism will never be tolerated, and this action bolsters my Administration’s efforts to create a culture of respect that deeply values the dignity in every human life.

As we come together as one Nation on this International Holocaust Remembrance Day, we ask God to grant strength to those who survived the depravity of the Nazi regime and comfort to the families of the victims whose lives were cut short.  We ask that the world reflect on this day and seek to ensure that we stand united against intolerance and oppression of people of every race, religion, or ethnicity.  And, in order to ensure that these horrific crimes against God and humanity never happen again, we must resolve to combat evil and oppressive regimes with democracy, justice, and the compassionate spirit that is found in the hearts of all Americans.".....Donald Trump

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefings-statements/presidential-message-international-holocaust-remembrance-day-2020/


34480630430_2b1ed410f4_b-1-820x547.jpg

 
 
 
r.t..b...
4  r.t..b...    one month ago

from the seed...

"She explained what her message would be to her mother, who died in Auschwitz along with her father, brother, two sisters and dozens of cousins."

It is impossible to comprehend the horror. It is equally amazing to see how the survivors have overcome the atrocities to share their experience...to our collective benefit and lest we ever forget. 

 
 
 
Sparty On
5  Sparty On    one month ago

Wow, that must have been very emotional for them.   I can only imagine .......

 
 
 
XDm9mm
6  XDm9mm    one month ago

The camps were the only part of his time during WWII that my late father-in-law ever spoke of other than surviving D-Day.

He never said which camp(s) he was involved in liberating but the only difference he could discern was the size of the horror.  He told us that the horrors he saw that were perpetrated on other human beings was unfathomable to any rational person.  What made it worse was that he and his combat companions could not feed the people they found as they were told doing so would make them sicker than they were and they would need long term incremental feeding to nurse them back to health.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
7  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.    one month ago

This is my Uncle Jack, who was married to my mum's sister. He is interviewed in the book, "Still Here". He is now 93 years old. 

http://stillherebook.com/jack-gutterman/

 
 
 
Jasper2529
8  Jasper2529    one month ago

I cannot begin to imagine the horror and terror that millions of Jews and Christians experienced at the hands of the Nazis. We must NEVER forget them, and it is our obligation to speak out and fight against all forms of hatred.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
9  Buzz of the Orient    one month ago
"I would love Hitler should be alive to see what I accomplished — that I'm alive," said survivor David Marks

The only reason I would want Hitler to be alive would be to have him stand trial in Israel like Adolph Eichmann did, and have him executed in a manner that is against the law and contrary to all morality - crucifying him would be the least extreme method I could think of, burning at the stake might suffice after yanking out all his finger and toenails.  Forgiveness or turning the other cheek would not be in my vocabulary for him.  

 
 
 
Donald J. Trump fan 1
9.1  Donald J. Trump fan 1  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @9    one month ago

You are right about Hitler.  I can understand the survivors desires that he see their successes in life.  Too bad he couldn’t be resurrected briefly to see all that and what Israel is today and then returned to death until the judgement when he will then burn in hell longer than any other human there in.  

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
9.2  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @9    one month ago

Buzz,

There is no one in my mom's family who wanted him dead. They wanted him to live in a hole till the end of his days. Death is merciful. 

 
 
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