TOPIC FOR DISCUSSION - My prediction: Trump will resign (or engineer his being "forced out") before Inauguration day

  

Category:  News & Politics

By:  krishna  •  2 weeks ago  •  63 comments

TOPIC FOR DISCUSSION - My prediction: Trump will resign (or engineer his being "forced out") before Inauguration day
Prediction is difficult, especially about the future --Yogi Berra

512

Photo: NBC News

I predict Trump will resign the office of President before Inauguration Day.

Discussion:

1. Do you agree?

2. Why or why not?


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Krishna
Professor Principal
1  author  Krishna    2 weeks ago

Of course I'm not 100% certain. But I believe its almost a certainty. (I will state my reasons after other people have a chance to post whether they agree or disagree--- and mostly importantly-- why they have come to the conclusion they have)..

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
1.1  Ozzwald  replied to  Krishna @1    2 weeks ago

Of course I'm not 100% certain. But I believe its almost a certainty. (I will state my reasons after other people have a chance to post whether they agree or disagree--- and mostly importantly-- why they have come to the conclusion they have)..

Completely agree with you.  I've been saying it for 2 years, Trump will resign so that Pence can pardon him.  It won't keep Trump out of jail, thank you SDNY, but it will prevent a lot of federal crimes from being thrown at him.

The question is if Pence can, or will, issue a pardon for any future crimes by Trump or his family.  That is probably the only way to keep Ivanka and Jared out of jail.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Principal
2  author  Krishna    2 weeks ago

I just realized-- saying "after Inauguration day" is kind of redundant-- he can't resign the Office of President after Inauguration Day!

So a better way to say it would be:

I predict Trump will resign the Office of President.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Senior Participates
2.1  Greg Jones  replied to  Krishna @2    2 weeks ago

Of course he won't. It appears you  haven't learned a thing about Trump after all this time..

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.1.1  Ozzwald  replied to  Greg Jones @2.1    2 weeks ago

It appears you  haven't learned a thing about Trump after all this time..

Greg, you're the one promoting the Trump can't lose bandwagon, up to the election.  I believe you were also on the Republicans won't lose the Senate one as well.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Senior Participates
2.1.2  Greg Jones  replied to  Ozzwald @2.1.1    2 weeks ago

I simply said he won't resign. Quitting is not his thing.  And neither will Pence use the 25th, nor will the Senate vote to impeach/remove him.

Stay on topic, I'm not it.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
2.1.3  Ozzwald  replied to  Greg Jones @2.1.2    2 weeks ago
Stay on topic

jrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gif

Hello pot...

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Principal
2.1.4  author  Krishna  replied to  Greg Jones @2.1.2    2 weeks ago
I simply said he won't resign. Quitting is not his thing.  And neither will Pence use the 25th, nor will the Senate vote to impeach/remove him.

You might be right on the first two. However there's very little doubt in my mind that the Senate will definitely vote to convict him-- but only after the new Senate convenes.

Pelosi wants the House to Impeach him ASAP. But once that's done (apparently by Wednesday)... McConnell  won't even come up for discussion in the Senate.

However its just a matter of days until the new Senate convenes-- where the Dems now have control. 

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Principal
3  author  Krishna    2 weeks ago

Also, if you are sure you know why, perhaps we should do what Buzz does on his movie quizzes-- don't explain the why until everyone has a chance to answer.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
3.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Krishna @3    2 weeks ago

LOL.  Yeah, it would be a big waste of my time creating a quiz and posting the answers with the quiz.  However, I do think I know why you thought, at first, why he SHOUDN'T quit.  But as I ask participants to do with my quizzes so they don't give the answers away to everyone else, I'll send you a PN with why - I know how much you hate getting notifications.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Principal
4  author  Krishna    2 weeks ago

Actually, the more I think about ti the more I think he might not actually resign (so he can save face)-- but rather get Pence and his Cabinet to use the 25th Amendment--- or-- have McConnell and his Republicans vote yes on the House's impeachment bill ) before Inauguration Day)

In other words, instead of resigned, make it seem like he was Impeached out-- out ousted by Pence andthe Cabinet. 

But somehow find a way to no longer be President before Inauguration Day-- he wants out!!!

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Senior Participates
4.1  Greg Jones  replied to  Krishna @4    2 weeks ago

No 25tth Amendment, no impeachment....it's over in a week. Let it go....

Dems need to grow up and govern, instead of being petulant, vindictive assholes

 
 
 
devangelical
Masters Expert
4.1.1  devangelical  replied to  Greg Jones @4.1    2 weeks ago
petulant, vindictive asshole

donald trump jrSmiley_115_smiley_image.png

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Participates
4.1.2  evilgenius  replied to  Greg Jones @4.1    2 weeks ago
Dems need to grow up and govern, instead of being petulant, vindictive assholes

I agree Dems should be less like Trump supporters.

 
 
 
Old Hermit
Sophomore Quiet
4.1.3  Old Hermit  replied to  devangelical @4.1.1    2 weeks ago
petulant, vindictive asshole
donald trump

original

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.1.4  Kavika   replied to  Greg Jones @4.1    2 weeks ago
Dems need to grow up and govern, instead of being petulant, vindictive assholes

That's really funny when the leader of the Republican party is the biggest petulant, vindictive asshole on earth....Keep up the comedy routine it's hilarious.jrSmiley_10_smiley_image.gif  

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
4.1.5  Ozzwald  replied to  Greg Jones @4.1    2 weeks ago
No 25tth Amendment, no impeachment....it's over in a week.

Agreed.  25th Amendment and impeachment = "you're fired".  Trump will never allow that to happen, he will resign or ride it out.

 
 
 
Tessylo
PhD Principal
4.1.6  Tessylo  replied to  Kavika @4.1.4    2 weeks ago

137605588_3648615841843063_8729961382972932967_n.jpg?_nc_cat=105&ccb=2&_nc_sid=730e14&_nc_ohc=1ulqhluLW40AX-NDMzP&_nc_ht=scontent-iad3-1.xx&tp=6&oh=81089f751493c0c9d94789286b16ce5c&oe=6020F1AF

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Principal
4.1.7  author  Krishna  replied to  Ozzwald @4.1.5    2 weeks ago
Agreed.  25th Amendment and impeachment = "you're fired".  Trump will never allow that to happen, he will resign or ride it out.

Actually after I posted this and thought it over, I decided that he won't resign. Probably Pence won't go along with 25th Amendment procedures (although Pence is really pissed at the way Trump has treated him-- but that's another topic).

So what I now think is that trump finish his term.

What I now think will happen is quick Impeachment in The House (I believe Pelosi is aiming for this Wednesday)-- and then after his term expires, the Democratically controlled Senate will vote to convict him.

(With or without any republican support-- although I wouldn't be surprised if one or two Republican Senators also vote to convict him).

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
4.1.8  Ozzwald  replied to  Krishna @4.1.7    2 weeks ago
Actually after I posted this and thought it over, I decided that he won't resign.

I think I am starting to think your way.  Trump has burned his pardon bridge when he started shitting on Pence.  The insurgents were looking for Pence as much as they were looking for Democrats when the broke into the Capitol building.  Pence knows this.

There is no longer any guarantee that Pence will pardon Trump if he resigns.  So Trump will try to pardon himself.

What I now think will happen is quick Impeachment in The House -- and then after his term expires, the Democratically controlled Senate will vote to convict him.

Unfortunately there is everyone's definition of "quick", and then there's the government's definition of "quick".  I completely agree, Trump will be impeached before he leaves, but the Senate will not find against him until he has left.

(With or without any republican support-- although I wouldn't be surprised if one or two Republican Senators also vote to convict him).

With.  Trump will be gone, Trump is wildly unpopular, Some will CYA and vote against him.

 
 
 
Drakkonis
Junior Guide
5  Drakkonis    2 weeks ago

I'm not sure his narcissism would allow him to step down on his own. If he did, it could be so that Pence, now President, could pardon him. Assuming he was convinced Pence would. 

 
 
 
Ronin2
Senior Quiet
5.1  Ronin2  replied to  Drakkonis @5    2 weeks ago

I agree.

Trump has too much to lose by resigning.  He will lose his hard core base. He needs them to launch his new media platform. They would be disenchanted by a resignation; it would be a sign of weakness.

Now if he is impeached that is a whole different ball game. He can claim this proves he was right; and his hard core followers will latch on tight. Of course it will mean massive protests; throwing some rioting when provoked- urged on. Trump is willing to allow that type of thing so long as he is not directly involved.  He can call for peace and calm as much as he wants to; knowing his base will not relent.

 
 
 
Drakkonis
Junior Guide
5.1.1  Drakkonis  replied to  Ronin2 @5.1    2 weeks ago

You might be right. There's always going to be a hardcore base that is for Trump no matter what. But it's my hope that some of those who unthinkingly follow Trump will begin to do a bit more thinking, once they see what's about to happen to the people who overran the Capital. They can hold on to what is important to them but, hopefully, stop thinking they need Trump to get it done. 

And I just had a really perverse thought. I know how Trump could eliminate all his enemies at once. Pardon all the people who attacked the Capital. All the Dems would die of apoplexy. Pretty black humor, I know. In actuality, I can't imagine a worse thing he could do short of launching nukes. I can't imagine how bad the fallout from that would be. But it would sure tie his base more tightly to himself, if that's possible. 

 
 
 
Ronin2
Senior Quiet
5.1.2  Ronin2  replied to  Drakkonis @5.1.1    2 weeks ago

No matter how this ends it will be badly for the US.

If his base gets harsh treatment by the courts- they will point out how BLM and Antifa have received preferential treatment; and spark off new protests and riots. If Trump pardons them the Democrats will indeed lose it; but then they call for Biden to pardon their radical base that have committed crimes.  

Both sides need to stop the harsh rhetoric; but that is not the way things are done in the US. The divide is widening by the day now. Neither side is willing to give the other an inch.

I almost feel sorry for the Republicans in the House and Senate. They are signing their own political death warrants if they vote to impeach Trump. Of course if they vote against impeachment they alienate the Republican never Trumpers, and moderates that hate Trump. 

I have no sympathy for Democrats who for 5 years have proven they can sink lower than Trump at every turn. They might think they are winning the day by forcing the impeachment issue; but the aftermath of protests and riots will still be partly on them. They could have just let Trump slither away and face whatever the State of NY could drum up; but instead decided to twist the knife that much deeper. Joe isn't helping calm anything; he should be telling the Dems to back down- even it is behind the scenes. So much for being the POTUS for everyone.

 

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Principal
5.1.3  Hal A. Lujah  replied to  Ronin2 @5.1    2 weeks ago

He will lose his hard core base.

That would be like losing hemorrhoids and genital warts combined.

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Participates
5.1.4  evilgenius  replied to  Drakkonis @5.1.1    2 weeks ago
Pardon all the people who attacked the Capital.

They could also be charged and prosecuted under local and state law. Under the law the federal DC prosecutor has the jurisdiction to work under either federal OR local DC law as he sees fit. This would not be subject to Presidential pardon, but would still melt heads on many on the left.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Senior Participates
5.1.5  Greg Jones  replied to  Drakkonis @5.1.1    2 weeks ago
They can hold on to what is important to them but, hopefully, stop thinking they need Trump to get it done. 
The Trumpian "revolution" now has a solid foundation of millions of followers and won't be going away. A wiser, more political savvy, and more articulate spokesman will surface before long

 
 
 
Drakkonis
Junior Guide
5.1.6  Drakkonis  replied to  Ronin2 @5.1.2    2 weeks ago
Both sides need to stop the harsh rhetoric; but that is not the way things are done in the US. The divide is widening by the day now. Neither side is willing to give the other an inch.

Yeah. Actually, it's the rhetoric that I blame most of all, from both sides. Both parties are using rhetoric to demonize the other side. Dehumanizing them. I think the left does it more, but I could be biased. Right now, they seem to be pushing it for all they are worth. Trying to paint everyone who's conservative or Republican with the same brush. But both sides appeal to emotion rather than rationality all too often. What we don't see a lot of is people speaking rationally. 

I almost feel sorry for the Republicans in the House and Senate. They are signing their own political death warrants if they vote to impeach Trump. Of course if they vote against impeachment they alienate the Republican never Trumpers, and moderates that hate Trump. 

That's probably accurate enough. Personally, I think it would be best if they voted to impeach because I'd rather have the Republican never Trumpers and moderates over the fanatics. Placating the others will only continue the current crisis. It might take a few years to recover but I think the party would be better for it. 

I have no sympathy for Democrats who for 5 years have proven they can sink lower than Trump at every turn. They might think they are winning the day by forcing the impeachment issue; but the aftermath of protests and riots will still be partly on them. They could have just let Trump slither away and face whatever the State of NY could drum up; but instead decided to twist the knife that much deeper. Joe isn't helping calm anything; he should be telling the Dems to back down- even it is behind the scenes. So much for being the POTUS for everyone.

Pretty much agree, again. The next two, possibly four years should be pretty revealing. Will the Dems do reasonable legislation or will they go crazy trying to change America into their idea of Utopia? 

 
 
 
Drakkonis
Junior Guide
5.1.7  Drakkonis  replied to  evilgenius @5.1.4    2 weeks ago
Under the law the federal DC prosecutor has the jurisdiction to work under either federal OR local DC law as he sees fit.

My understanding was that a Presidential pardon released the individual from any federal prosecution. 

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Participates
5.1.8  evilgenius  replied to  Drakkonis @5.1.7    2 weeks ago

Federal yes, but if charged under local DC law or Maryland/Virginia state law no.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
5.1.9  Ozzwald  replied to  Ronin2 @5.1    2 weeks ago
Trump has too much to lose by resigning.  He will lose his hard core base.

I call bull on that.  Trump will spin his resignation, and his base will eat it up like shit flavored ice cream and love it.

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
5.1.10  Thrawn 31  replied to  Ronin2 @5.1    2 weeks ago
I agree. Trump has too much to lose by resigning.  He will lose his hard core base. He needs them to launch his new media platform. They would be disenchanted by a resignation; it would be a sign of weakness.

You are exactly right. He needs to keep his base for future business failures, I mean ventures. 

Now if he is impeached that is a whole different ball game. He can claim this proves he was right; and his hard core followers will latch on tight. Of course it will mean massive protests; throwing some rioting when provoked- urged on. Trump is willing to allow that type of thing so long as he is not directly involved.  He can call for peace and calm as much as he wants to; knowing his base will not relent.

I would say we are already at that point based upon last week and what folks seem to be planning for the 20th. I don't think a second impeachment will have any effect on that. Trump whines about how mean everyone and everything is to him as is, what is one more gripe? 

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
5.1.11  Thrawn 31  replied to  Drakkonis @5.1.7    2 weeks ago

It prevents him from being charged with federal crimes for a specific action, but it does not apply to the states. Hence why no matter what he does as far as pardons go, the State of New York can still prosecute the shit out of him and there is nothing he can do to stop it. 

 
 
 
Tessylo
PhD Principal
5.1.12  Tessylo  replied to  evilgenius @5.1.4    2 weeks ago
"but would still melt heads on many on the left."

Which is their only goal

 
 
 
Drakkonis
Junior Guide
5.1.13  Drakkonis  replied to  Thrawn 31 @5.1.11    2 weeks ago
It prevents him from being charged with federal crimes for a specific action, but it does not apply to the states. Hence why no matter what he does as far as pardons go, the State of New York can still prosecute the shit out of him and there is nothing he can do to stop it. 

I was thinking more of the Capital Hill gang if Trump pardoned them. I understand they could still be prosecuted under state law or DC law, but I wonder how many states actually have laws against coup's and sedition against the Federal Government? Seems like odd things for states to worry about including in their legal code since it seems more naturally a federal issue. Better, I think, if the violent ones, at least, were prosecuted under federal law. 

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
5.1.14  Thrawn 31  replied to  Drakkonis @5.1.13    2 weeks ago
but I wonder how many states actually have laws against coup's and sedition against the Federal Government? Seems like odd things for states to worry about including in their legal code since it seems more naturally a federal issue.

An interesting point. I am wondering though, that because of the supremacy clause, if it was unnecessary for the states to include it in their state constitutions? That because the US Constitution makes sedition a crime would it then apply at the state level as well? As in could a state press charges of sedition if the act was conducted within its boundaries in addition to or in the absence of federal charges? 

Better, I think, if the violent ones, at least, were prosecuted under federal law. 

Oh I agree, it is an interesting question though. I did a little bit of research and didn't come across anything discussing whether a state can bring charges of sedition, just a bucnh about the feds. I kinda want to ask a couple of my old professors what they think.

 
 
 
Drakkonis
Junior Guide
5.1.15  Drakkonis  replied to  Thrawn 31 @5.1.14    2 weeks ago
I am wondering though, that because of the supremacy clause, if it was unnecessary for the states to include it in their state constitutions? That because the US Constitution makes sedition a crime would it then apply at the state level as well? As in could a state press charges of sedition if the act was conducted within its boundaries in addition to or in the absence of federal charges? 

Good question. I'm no lawyer but the clause seems more about resolving conflicts concerning who has precedence in disputed matters. Really, though, I have no clue. 

Oh I agree, it is an interesting question though. I did a little bit of research and didn't come across anything discussing whether a state can bring charges of sedition, just a bucnh about the feds. I kinda want to ask a couple of my old professors what they think.

If you ever find out, I'd be interested hearing about it. 

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Principal
5.1.16  author  Krishna  replied to  Drakkonis @5.1.1    2 weeks ago
Pardon all the people who attacked the Capital.

I had that thought as well.

I'm sure he'd love to do that.

But pardoning terrorists (and in a few cases murderers-- especially cop killers) might piss off too many level-headed Republicans).

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Principal
5.1.17  author  Krishna  replied to  Ronin2 @5.1    2 weeks ago
. Of course it will mean massive protests;

That may happen anyway-- in several state Capitols.

I believe the FBI has warned that here may now be armed attacks on some state Capitols.

These MAGA terrorists, like most terrorists, are committed fanatics..many are armed, dangerous, and totally crazy extremists. 

 
 
 
Dragon
Freshman Silent
6  Dragon    2 weeks ago

 Trump won't resign, he needs his base, if only to send him money and commit violent acts. He would prefer the 25th or impeachment so he can be a martyr and victim...his most favorite roles.

He needs to be held accountable for January 6th, by Congress or federal law enforcement, allowing him to "slither away" without accountability is a dangerous precedent to set. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6.1  JohnRussell  replied to  Dragon @6    2 weeks ago

What should happen is Trump should be indicted and convicted and sent to prison for a smorgasbord of crimes he has committed over the years, including the recent ones. 

What will happen is he will pardon himself and all the relevant political figures will say how terrible it is and do nothing about it. 

Any "punishment" he receives will be left to the prosecutors in New York, where the outcome is extremely uncertain. 

America is a fucked up society right now, and I dont see it changing for the better any time soon. 

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
6.1.1  Ozzwald  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1    2 weeks ago
What will happen is he will pardon himself and all the relevant political figures will say how terrible it is and do nothing about it

That is the only thing that will decide his actions.

Is Trump stupid and narcissistic enough to believe he can pardon himself, or will he resign so Pense can do it will no question to its legality?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Senior Participates
6.1.2  Greg Jones  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1    2 weeks ago
America is a fucked up society right now, and I dont see it changing for the better any time soon. 

Especially now that the Democrats have total control

 
 
 
Ozzwald
PhD Quiet
6.1.3  Ozzwald  replied to  Greg Jones @6.1.2    2 weeks ago
Especially now that the Democrats have total control

News flash Greg, Democrats don't have control now, so the fucked up society rests right on the Republican's shoulders.

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
6.1.4  Thrawn 31  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1    2 weeks ago
What will happen is he will pardon himself and all the relevant political figures will say how terrible it is and do nothing about it. 

I certainly hope you are wrong, but I must admit there is a 75% chance you are correct. I do want this to go to the SCOTUS and be settled once and for all though. The Supreme Court needs to just flat out say the president is or is not above the law. It was okay leaving it as an academic exercise before because we have never had a president who would commit such an egregious abuse of power, but now we do. It cannot just be an academic exercise any longer. 

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
6.1.5  Thrawn 31  replied to  Greg Jones @6.1.2    2 weeks ago
Especially now that the Democrats have total control

Your idiot president has been in the White House for 4 years, the GOP had full control of the legislative branch for two years. it isn't the democrats fault they didn't do shit else with it other than give me and other well off people more money for no reason. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
6.1.6  Texan1211  replied to  Thrawn 31 @6.1.5    2 weeks ago

How much money did you get?

What was the amount of the check?

 
 
 
lib50
Professor Quiet
6.1.7  lib50  replied to  Texan1211 @6.1.6    2 weeks ago

Didn't you get one? Or a direct deposit? Or is this just a rhetorical whataboutism question?

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
6.1.8  Thrawn 31  replied to  Texan1211 @6.1.6    2 weeks ago

I never got any stimulus checks, but I have been enjoying paying lower taxes overall. Been sending that shit straight into a trust fund.

 
 
 
Tessylo
PhD Principal
6.1.9  Tessylo  replied to  lib50 @6.1.7    2 weeks ago

jrSmiley_91_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
6.1.10  Texan1211  replied to  lib50 @6.1.7    2 weeks ago
Didn't you get one? Or a direct deposit?

yes, Is that the point here--that I got one?

Or was my point asking him how much he got that he didn't need? I wonder why he didn't refuse it?

Remember that I certainly never said I didn't need it or want it. I never complained about receiving it, he did.

I guess this means he won't vote Democratic or Republican next time, seeing as how both parties passed it in Congress.

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
6.1.11  Texan1211  replied to  Thrawn 31 @6.1.8    2 weeks ago
I never got any stimulus checks,

So when did the government give you money you claim you don't need?

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
6.1.12  Thrawn 31  replied to  Texan1211 @6.1.11    2 weeks ago

When they changed the tax code, especially by lowering corporate taxes, and the savings going right back to investors. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
PhD Principal
6.1.13  Texan1211  replied to  Thrawn 31 @6.1.12    2 weeks ago

Ah, so you are one of those people who believe it is all the government's money, and they were just nice enough to let you keep more of what you earned.

LOL!

Most folks think their money is their money and if taxes are lowered, it just means you get to keep more of your money.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Principal
6.1.14  author  Krishna  replied to  JohnRussell @6.1    2 weeks ago
What will happen is he will pardon himself

IIRC, its still undecided as to whether a President can pardon himself.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Principal
6.1.15  author  Krishna  replied to  Greg Jones @6.1.2    2 weeks ago
Especially now that the Democrats have total control

Well they don't have control of the MAGA terrorists-- who have left the Capitol are are home-- in various locations across the country. 

Trump has warned them to never give up...(probably different individuals interpret that differently...)

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
6.2  Thrawn 31  replied to  Dragon @6    2 weeks ago
He needs to be held accountable for January 6th, by Congress or federal law enforcement, allowing him to "slither away" without accountability is a dangerous precedent to set. 

Letting him slink away and face no punishment sends a very clear, and very disturbing message to all future would be dictators. It sends the message that the legislative branch of government is utterly spineless, you just have to be a little smarter than Donny Dip Shit.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Principal
6.2.1  author  Krishna  replied to  Thrawn 31 @6.2    2 weeks ago
Letting him slink away and face no punishment

I thinknhe will be impeached quickly in The House-- then be found guilty in the Senate Trial-- after the 20th.

Of course he won't face the punishment of being removed from office because at that point he will no longer be in office.

But if impeached he will never be allowed to hold public office again/

And being impeached and then being found guilty by the Senate send a clear message!

 
 
 
Tessylo
PhD Principal
6.3  Tessylo  replied to  Dragon @6    2 weeks ago
"He needs to be held accountable for January 6th, by Congress or federal law enforcement, allowing him to "slither away" without accountability is a dangerous precedent to set." 

AGREED.  Anything less is, to me, unacceptable.  

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Senior Guide
7  Thrawn 31    2 weeks ago

Nah, he has a few more pardons to dole out. which is funny because it means that he knows he did some illegal shit and he could get into serious trouble.

Honestly I truly hope he decides to pardon himself and it goes to the SCOTUS. This is a question that needs to be definitively answered. IMO the founders didn't explicitly say "a president cannot pardon themselves, their family members, or close friends because that would be a grave abuse of power and undermine everything we are trying to do here" because they couldn't envision that a person with a moral character so low it can be said to be nonexistent, no concern whatsoever for the constitutional republic they were trying to set up, and absolutely no sense of shame would actually be elected to a position with such power. This needs to be officially settled. Trump has shown us that there are many things that needs to be explicitly written down.

 
 
 
FLYNAVY1
Professor Expert
8  FLYNAVY1    2 weeks ago

He will  pardon himself and then slink away on 20JAN.  He won't resign and hope for a pardon from Pence.... I think Pence was marked for elimination by the Trump followers last week, so that little detail settled into Mike's mind.

 
 
 
TᵢG
PhD Principal
9  TᵢG    2 weeks ago

I disagree.   Trump's ego prevents him from resigning.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Principal
10  author  Krishna    2 weeks ago

P.S: Even if he were to be pardoned-- that would only be for federal crimes. Once he no longer has the protection of being President, he could still be tried for violations of state laws.

 
 
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