Saks Fifth Avenue says it will stop selling fur by 2023

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  perrie-halpern  •  one month ago  •  56 comments

By:   Elisha Fieldstadt

Saks Fifth Avenue says it will stop selling fur by 2023
Designer clothes retailer Saks Fifth Avenue will stop selling animal fur by the end of fiscal year 2022, the company announced Wednesday. PETA

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



Designer clothes retailer Saks Fifth Avenue will stop selling animal fur by the end of fiscal year 2022, the company announced Wednesday.

The elimination applies to both Saks-made fur clothing and from vendor partners both online and in stores, the company said in a statement.

"Across the Saks Fifth Avenue experience, we evaluate a number of factors when making decisions about our assortment, including customer preferences and societal shifts," Tracy Margolies, Chief Merchandising Officer for Saks, said in a statement. "We recognize that trends constantly evolve, and that the sale of fur remains a significant social issue. As such, eliminating it from our assortment is the right step for us to take at this time."

Animal rights activists rally in front of Saks Fifth Avenue in New York City on March 6, 2021.Lev Radin / Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

Saks plans to close all of its fur salons by the end of fiscal year 2021, which is the period ending January 29, 2022. It will phase out the sale of fur products from vendors by the end of fiscal year 2022, which is the period ending January 28, 2023.

Saks Fifth Avenue, which is owned by Hudson's Bay Company and has 45 locations, plans to close all of its fur salons by the end of fiscal 2021.

The luxury retailer will also work closely with vendor partners to phase out the sale of fur products both online and in stores by the end of fiscal 2022.

Saks will continued to sell faux fur products, as well as sheepskin, lambskin, goatskin, cattle hide, down and leather.

The retailer follows Nordstrom, which said it would stop sale of  fur and exotic animal skin merchandise by  the end of  2021, and Macy's and Bloomingdale's, which committed to stop selling fur by the end of fiscal year 2020.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals lauded Saks' decision, saying in a statement that the animal rights group had been protesting the store's fur business for years.

"May its 'fur salons' rest in pieces, for they won't be missed by today's shoppers, who no longer find it acceptable to drape themselves in an abused animal's stolen skin," PETA President Ingrid Newkirk said in a statement.


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Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
1  Vic Eldred    one month ago

What a shame!

Farewell to a great look!

OIP.Tmvb5VbwufhT_VGV5KJu9QHaLu?w=198&h=314&c=7&o=5&pid=1.7

 
 
 
expatingb
Freshman Quiet
1.1  expatingb  replied to  Vic Eldred @1    one month ago
Farewell to a great look!

It's still popular and used in many if not all Eastern European countries.  It's warm, very durable and I don't believe those people find it necessary to destroy their history, industries and appearance for the sake of political correctness.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
1.1.1  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  expatingb @1.1    one month ago
people find it necessary to destroy their history, industries and appearance for the sake of political correctness.

This has nothing to do with PC, this has to do with sales, which are way down. 

 
 
 
expatingb
Freshman Quiet
1.1.2  expatingb  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @1.1.1    one month ago
This has nothing to do with PC, this has to do with sales, which are way down.

Sales are down in the states because some people made it their business what other people wore and berated them for their decisions.  

They were simply the precursor to the cancel culture of today.  

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
1.1.3  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  expatingb @1.1.2    one month ago

Or people saw what actually goes on, on these fur farms and realized what a waste it is.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
1.2  Tessylo  replied to  Vic Eldred @1    one month ago

Which would look just as great in faux fur. . . . so your faux outrage is duly noted!

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
2  Kavika     one month ago

About time.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
3  Vic Eldred    one month ago

Every nicety must be stamped out per the thought police!

 
 
 
devangelical
PhD Principal
3.1  devangelical  replied to  Vic Eldred @3    one month ago

so guess what I'm thinking.

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
3.1.1  Vic Eldred  replied to  devangelical @3.1    one month ago

We've heard...a lot of death wishing.

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
Professor Guide
3.1.2  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  devangelical @3.1    one month ago
so guess what I'm thinking.

Leave the door unlocked.  I'll be right there.  jrSmiley_93_smiley_image.jpg

 
 
 
devangelical
PhD Principal
3.1.3  devangelical  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @3.1.2    one month ago

nice pelt.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
3.1.4  Ender  replied to  devangelical @3.1.3    one month ago

TMI !

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
Professor Guide
3.2  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  Vic Eldred @3    one month ago

How would you like it if someone skinned you and made you into a coat, or perhaps a really tall, silly-looking hat last seen on the Wizard of Oz?

55ddb5c0e3abe1e68b459c08067065e7.jpg

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
3.2.1  Ender  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @3.2    one month ago

Some people are hairy enough...

 
 
 
expatingb
Freshman Quiet
3.2.2  expatingb  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @3.2    one month ago
How would you like it if someone skinned you and made you into a coat, or perhaps a really tall, silly-looking hat last seen on the Wizard of Oz?

Actually, the "Cowardly Lion" in the Wizard of Oz was actually wearing a lion skin outfit.

The Wicked Witch was actually burned in the one scene.

I believe it was Buddy Epson that was supposed to be the Tin Man, but was poisoned by the aluminum makeup they applied.

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
Professor Guide
3.2.3  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  expatingb @3.2.2    one month ago
Actually, the "Cowardly Lion" in the Wizard of Oz was actually wearing a lion skin outfit.

The Wicked Witch was actually burned in the one scene.

I believe it was Buddy Epson that was supposed to be the Tin Man, but was poisoned by the aluminum makeup they applied.

We've learned so much since 1939, wouldn't you agree?

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
3.2.4  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Ender @3.2.1    one month ago

jrSmiley_86_smiley_image.gif That reminded me of when my husband saw my dad without his shirt on for the first time. My husband said, "Dad, you know it's okay to take off that sweater, it's pretty hot out today." Of course, he was joking, my dad is just that hairy. My dad found it amusing.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
3.3  Tessylo  replied to  Vic Eldred @3    one month ago

Nicety?

Thought Police?

jrSmiley_88_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
expatingb
Freshman Quiet
4  expatingb    one month ago

So, any fur removed from animals hunted and eaten will find a new home in a landfill?

Animal fur has been used by our species since, well forever.  

I still have, well somewhere stored, a fur lined parka issued by the army for cold weather environments.  My only complaint was the propensity of any visible fur to catch any snow and moisture and freeze.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
4.1  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  expatingb @4    one month ago

As someone who is Indian, fur has always been used, but only as a by-product for hunting for food. Every part of the animal's body is used since it gave its life to us. 

The fur used in this industry is just for the fur. The animal is thrown away after it has been skinned. 

So this does not apply to animals used in the food industry, like leather. 

Just food for thought.

 
 
 
expatingb
Freshman Quiet
4.1.1  expatingb  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @4.1    one month ago
The fur used in this industry is just for the fur. The animal is thrown away after it has been skinned. 

So this does not apply to animals used in the food industry, like leather. 

Just food for thought.

Maybe you should look up cuniculture.  It's primarily used by the rabbit farmers but is applicable to other animals as well, like chinchilla.

Let me know if you need some hasenpfeffer recipes.  I'll admit that I have gotten most off the internet as I previously fried the filets, so you might want to investigate that as well.  And no, it doesn;t taste like chicken.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
4.1.2  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  expatingb @4.1.1    one month ago

Saks does not sell rabbit. They sell mink, chinchilla, and sable which is not eaten and thrown away. 

And I don't eat rabbits, since I used to breed them for pets.

 
 
 
expatingb
Freshman Quiet
4.1.3  expatingb  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @4.1.2    one month ago
And I don't eat rabbits, since I used to breed them for pets.

But isn't breeding an animal to keep it as a pet also inhumane?   

There's always two sides to every story.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
4.1.4  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  expatingb @4.1.3    one month ago

Do you think a pet dog or cat is inhumane since my cat seems to like his cooshie homelife. 

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
Professor Guide
4.1.5  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @4.1.4    one month ago
Do you think a pet dog or cat is inhumane since my cat seems to like his cooshie homelife. 

The Halpern worse-kept family secret:  Wally is in charge.

 
 
 
devangelical
PhD Principal
4.1.7  devangelical  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @4.1.4    one month ago
 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
4.1.8  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @4.1.5    one month ago

Quite so. He is the big cheese. 

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
4.1.9  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  devangelical @4.1.7    one month ago

LOL... pretty much!

 
 
 
devangelical
PhD Principal
4.1.10  devangelical  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @4.1.9    one month ago
 
 
 
zuksam
Sophomore Silent
4.1.11  zuksam  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @4.1    one month ago

I guess it depends whether they're trapped fur or farmed fur. Trappers eat some, feed some to their dogs and the rest gets eaten by wildlife and since people only trap for fur in the dead of winter when many animals suffer from lack of food trapping probably does as much good as damage to wildlife. As far as farmed fur I doubt they throw anything away as Industries are always looking for ways to increase revenue. If you can't sell the meat and bones for dog food you can feed it to your Minks and Sables. Organic fertilizer manufacturers are always looking for bones and poop. A lot of people make their livings from fur and many couldn't live in rural Alaska, Canada, Russia without the income from winter trapping. Fur is organic, biodegradable, and renewable, it doesn't emit greenhouse gases or cause Global warming. When I lived in Alaska I had a lot of hats but once you get a fur hat you realize there's just nothing better for the extreme cold than Fur.

 
 
 
bccrane
Freshman Silent
4.1.12  bccrane  replied to  zuksam @4.1.11    one month ago

Thanks that's what I was going to say, like in the pork industry the only thing that gets away is the squeal.

If they stop buying the fur and hides, the farmers in this area will take the problem into their own hands because the trappers and hunters for fur will cease to exist.  Raccoon is becoming a big problem as prices drop from lack of demand, we will just go out and drop them and leave them lay, we will have no other choice.  

 
 
 
devangelical
PhD Principal
4.1.13  devangelical  replied to  bccrane @4.1.12    one month ago

I know I couldn't live without my raccoon pelts. I better stock up.

 
 
 
Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom
Professor Guide
4.2  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom  replied to  expatingb @4    one month ago

They are talking about animals being bred and slaughtered specifically for their fur.  They are not talking about what your beef bourguignon was wearing before it was served.  Jeez.

 
 
 
expatingb
Freshman Quiet
4.2.1  expatingb  replied to  Sister Mary Agnes Ample Bottom @4.2    one month ago

See 4.1.1

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
4.3  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  expatingb @4    one month ago
So, any fur removed from animals hunted and eaten will find a new home in a landfill?

I've never had a problem with those that hunt, eat, and tan hides; I have a problem with places that have horrible environments to raise animals ONLY for their furs / pelts / etc. I have fox and rabbit fur on some of my Native American art pieces, but the people that hunted those animals, also ate the meat and those animals were out in the wild; not in some nasty place being "raised" in horrible conditions just so rich people can have their fur coats [and the like].

Wool doesn't kill the sheep... it's plenty toasty.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
5  Kavika     one month ago
So, any fur removed from animals hunted and eaten will find a new home in a landfill?

80% of the fur used are animals raised on ''fur farms'', mink, fox, racoon and rabbit. So the landfills are being filled by the carcasses sans fur of the animals. These so-called ''fur farms'' are at best inhumane and some of the largest ones are shutting down operations for lack of demand. 

 
 
 
expatingb
Freshman Quiet
5.1  expatingb  replied to  Kavika @5    one month ago
These so-called ''fur farms'' are at best inhumane and some of the largest ones are shutting down operations for lack of demand.

I surmise you also feel that way about cattle, chicken, pig and turkey farms then also being inhumane.

Now, I will agree that the majority are likely closing as there is less demand and that lowered demand has raised prices for the fur sold, which further lowers demand in a typical changing/closing business cycle.

 
 
 
Sunshine
Masters Guide
6  Sunshine    one month ago

Wonder if the leather will go too?

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
6.1  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Sunshine @6    one month ago

Doubtful. The cows bred for meat, their hides can still be used for leather and then more of the cow is used. The less waste there is of an animal intended for food, the better, I think.

When an animal is killed strictly for it's fur / pelt / hide / rack /etc., it's horrible in my opinion.

 
 
 
Sunshine
Masters Guide
6.1.1  Sunshine  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @6.1    one month ago

idk, doesn't seem to make it any better to me.

If they didn't get the meat from cows, they would still raise cows for the leather.  Hide/fur same difference. 

And then there are the alligator farms for the leather industry.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
6.1.2  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Sunshine @6.1.1    one month ago

I like steaks and hamburgers... so, take that for what it's worth.

Alligators... usually caught in the swamps and the meat is most often consumed locally and hides are sold to the highest bidders, but yes, I'm sure that there are farms for them too... and no, I don't think it's right.

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
6.1.3  Ender  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @6.1.2    one month ago

Here it is legal just to cull gators at certain times.

 
 
 
Sunshine
Masters Guide
6.1.4  Sunshine  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @6.1.2    one month ago
I like steaks and hamburgers..

I like them too I just don't see the difference of breeding animals for wearing furs compared to wearing hides.  I doubt we would stop breeding cows because everyone became vegans.  Large market for leather.  

Everyone has chaps and whips...jrSmiley_4_smiley_image.png

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
6.1.5  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Sunshine @6.1.4    one month ago

If everyone became vegans, they would not wear leather. 

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
6.1.6  Kathleen  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @6.1.2    one month ago

I told my husband never buy me a fur coat or expensive jewelry, instead let’s take a nice trip instead.

 
 
 
Sunshine
Masters Guide
6.1.7  Sunshine  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @6.1.5    one month ago

Good point but we don’t need meat either.  Cows are killed because people like meat not because they need it.  They are going to kill the cow anyways seems like a lame excuse to use leather.

And cow breeding is not exactly humane either and dairy farms are very cruel to cows.  They go through stressful production for years.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
6.1.8  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Kathleen @6.1.6    one month ago

I'm with you Kathleen. I'd much rather make memories. 

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
6.1.9  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Sunshine @6.1.7    one month ago

We actually do need animal protein. There are 9 amino acids that we get from animal meat. The only veggie substitute that fills this void is soy, but soy comes with its own issues like estrogen that seems to be harming men. 

I will not argue that most of the food industry is cruel to animals (there are more humane farms that you can buy from, but of course it costs more)

 
 
 
Sunshine
Masters Guide
6.1.10  Sunshine  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @6.1.9    one month ago

We don’t have to have animal protein to get the same 9 amino acids.  A plant base diet can provide the same amino acids.

However, if you’re following a plant-based diet, you can still ensure proper intake of all essential amino acids as long as you eat a variety of plant proteins each day .

For example, choosing a variety of incomplete proteins such as beans, nuts, seeds, whole grains and vegetables can ensure that your essential amino acid needs are met, even if you choose to exclude animal products from your diet.

 
 
 
zuksam
Sophomore Silent
6.1.11  zuksam  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @6.1.5    one month ago

There are some things made from Leather that people wouldn't want to give up. I ride motorcycles but I could give up my leather Jacket and Chaps but not my Gloves no way. Shoes are another thing that I prefer in leather but I have had a few non leather shoes I liked fine but i only use Leather belts there is no suitable substitute for the comfort and durability of a leather belt. 

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Sophomore Principal
6.1.12  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Sunshine @6.1.7    one month ago

And cow breeding is not exactly humane either and dairy farms are very cruel to cows.  They go through stressful production for years.

Depends on the farm. There's a few local farms near me that encourage people to come visit their farms and meet the animals that us customers get the dairy and meats from and they're not the evil inhumane farms that many people see or hear about. I buy my meats and dairy from local sources. I far prefer knowing where those things come from and knowing that they're treated humanely as well as without added hormones among other things.

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
7  Kathleen    one month ago

Fine with me. I gave away 2 fur coats I had when I was younger that were my grandmothers. I would never buy one. 

Glad they are thinking about our furry friends. 

 
 
 
Ender
PhD Principal
7.1  Ender  replied to  Kathleen @7    one month ago

I knew someone that had a rabbit fur coat. It was old and never used and hung somewhere for a long time. They finally pulled it out and it had begun to disintegrate.

They threw it away.

 
 
 
Kathleen
PhD Principal
7.1.1  Kathleen  replied to  Ender @7.1    one month ago

These were mink and chinchilla. I gave them away many years ago. 

 
 
 
Tacos!
Professor Expert
8  Tacos!    one month ago

I’m just surprised to hear they still sell fur at all. It seems to me selling fur is even more rare than cigarette smoking these days.

 
 
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