The 400 Years Project

  

Category:  Photography & Art

Via:  hallux  •  2 weeks ago  •  11 comments

By:   SHEYAHSHE LITTLEDAVE

The 400 Years Project
A photography collective looking at the evolution of Native American identity, rights, and representation.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



The year 2020 marked the 400th anniversary of the Mayflower's arrival from England to Plymouth Rock, Mass., a moment encapsulated with the general notion that the following year, pilgrims broke bread with the Wampanoag Tribe in an act of friendship.

For generations that story — from the white settlers' perspective — has been taught to children in schools.

"The Mayflower and its aftermath has become the first and most culturally iconic story told to many young Americans about the country's founding and initial relationships with Native people," says photographer Sarah Stacke.

"But the stories they're told of a golden age of friendship, new beginnings, and untouched wilderness, is a myth."

For galleries:

https://www.400yearsproject.org/


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Hallux
Freshman Principal
1  seeder  Hallux    2 weeks ago

My apologies if this was previously posted, but if we want to celebrate our human present we must first know not only our past but everyone's.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
2  Kavika     2 weeks ago

I familiar with the project, and it is a wonderful endeavor. Most Americans and Canadians know little about us even though we have been here since time immortal. I love the photos that are in the seeded article. 

Currently, there is 'Project 562'' by Makita Wilbur. 

As a member of Miskwaagamiiwi-zaaga'igan (Lake with its liquid colored red) or as it is known to non-Indians Red Lake Ojibwe Reservation in Northern Minnesota. I found a photographer from the early 1900s that I consider equal if not much better than Charles Curtis. Roland Reed unlike Curtis was not funded by the wealthy and actually lived with some of the tribes that he was photographing and to me most importantly he lived on the Red Lake Reservations for a couple of years and in addition to the photos, he wrote a lot of background on many of the photos. His book, ''Alone with the Past'' has his photos and stories. It is wonderful and has a place of honor in my home. 

Another great Native American photographer is Richard Throssel. His photo of Crow life on the reservation in the early 1900s is classic. 

Thanks for posting this, Hallux.

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Principal
2.1  seeder  Hallux  replied to  Kavika @2    2 weeks ago

I thought of using the photo by Kali Spitzer but folks around here are just too freaked out by what does not fit their agenda nor their pastel image of Native Americans.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
2.1.1  Kavika   replied to  Hallux @2.1    2 weeks ago

LOL, that is true for many around here. 

This is a photo by Roland Reed, entitled ''Every Wind'' taken in 1907 on the Red Lake Rez. My nookomis (grandmother) remembers when Reed was living on the rez. I have this photo hanging in my study.

512

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Principal
2.1.2  seeder  Hallux  replied to  Kavika @2.1.1    2 weeks ago

She looks extraordinarily  noble ... alas the goon squad would think it's AOC and they damn her for the temerity of being born.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
2.1.3  Kavika   replied to  Hallux @2.1.2    2 weeks ago

I know that your quite familiar with the Mohawk so this photo and story (additional photos) may be of interest to you. 

512

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
2.1.4  sandy-2021492  replied to  Kavika @2.1.3    2 weeks ago

I clicked the link, and some of those pics - those were some brave men, working at those heights.

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
2.1.5  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  sandy-2021492 @2.1.4    2 weeks ago

One of the lessons in the high school English textbook I used to teach Chinese students here was about the Native American steelworkers who built the skyscrapers in NYC.  The students were wonderous about their nerves of steel and absence of fear of heights.  A story in the lesson was about a man who had helped to clear the tangled WTC steel girders after 9/11, and his grandfather, who had helped to build it. 

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
3  Buzz of the Orient    2 weeks ago

An Amazing collection.  The "David and Goliath" photo made me smile.  I would have liked to have seen captions on the photos, though.  I don't think Hallux is familiar with Kavika's and my collaborations of posting photo essays on NT of famous Native American photographers and others who were non-Indian photographers of vintage Native American life.

 
 
 
Hallux
Freshman Principal
3.1  seeder  Hallux  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @3    one week ago
I don't think Hallux is familiar

I'm getting there ....

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Principal
4  Raven Wing    2 weeks ago

Thank you for posting this great seed, Hallux. The vast number of Native American Tribes across America, while similar in many ways, are also very different in many ways. Their very differing artwork is only one of the many ways they are different. As member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Tribe, I try to enlighten non-Native Americans of the various traditions, cultures and Spiritual beliefs of some of the Tribes in my artwork. They say that a picture says a thousand words, so that is why I chose artwork to say the words for me.

My work is posted here on NT in the Creative Arts group each week, in the hopes that others will not only find some enjoyment in my work, but, also an understanding of the Native American way of life.

Here is an image of a Warrior with his War Pony to show the oneness of the two, as in battle each of their lives depends on their oneness of mind.

384

 
 
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