This Columbus Day Interview From Fox News Is Offensive

  

Category:  Op/Ed

Via:  john-russell  •  2 months ago  •  75 comments

This Columbus Day Interview From Fox News Is Offensive
As probably jumped out at you, Piscopo totally leaves out the ethnic group at the heart of this controversy, the Native-Americans.

I could have put this on one of the existing Columbus Day seeds but I decided it rated its own attention. 

Fox News interviews the old SNL "funny man" (to use the word loosely) Joe Piscopo.  Piscopo goes on to say something extremely offensive about Columbus Day, but he is obviously too stupid to realize it. 

He defends Columbus Day on the basis that his grandparents were Italian immigrants. They told him that they came because America is the greatest country on earth. As irrelevant as that is to Columbus , and what Columbus did, that is not the really offensive part of Piscopo's bs. 

At the 1:45 mark on the video Piscopo says

"What we celebrate today is really beyond Columbus, it is celebrating the ethnicity of America. The ethnicity and the mosaic is the foundation of the United States Of America. It's the strength of America, they literally by their hands built this great country. The Italian -Americans, the Jewish Americans, the Latino-Americans, the black Americans, the Chinese -Americans , we're all in this together. And once you cancel out one of those groups, in this case Italian-Americans, you hurt all of those groups,  you hurt all of America. " 

As probably jumped out at you, Piscopo totally leaves out the ethnic group at the heart of this controversy, the Native-Americans. He DOES NOT mention them as one of the groups that contribute to the greatness of America. 

A simple oversight from a simpleton? Maybe, but I think it is more of an expressed worldview. 

The bimbo Fox host goes on to associate criticism of Columbus with communism and un-Americanism. 

All in all a pretty disgusting video. 


S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



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JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1  seeder  JohnRussell    2 months ago

This video is a good example of what is wrong with Fox News on a daily basis. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.1  Texan1211  replied to  JohnRussell @1    2 months ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Texan1211 @1.1    2 months ago

no trolling

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.1.2  Texan1211  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.1    2 months ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.1.3  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Texan1211 @1.1.2    2 months ago

To me, stupid repetitive questions are trolling. 

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.1.4  Texan1211  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.3    2 months ago
To me, stupid repetitive questions are trolling. 

Then you should probably learn that me asking ONE fucking question of you directly related to what YOU wrote is not repetitive.

 
 
 
Dismayed Patriot
Professor Participates
1.2  Dismayed Patriot  replied to  JohnRussell @1    2 months ago

It's just another example of how white conservative Christians desperately want only their version of history to be taught. I mean how could Piscopo include Native-Americans if he's intent on giving credit to Columbus for "discovering" America?

They want to teach that Columbus discovered their fantasy "America" which was in their minds empty and that their white Christian ancestors came here and created a new utopia while leaving out the genocides and murder of millions. They want to teach that southern slave owners treated their slaves more like family than cattle, they want to teach that the civil war was really about states rights, they want to teach that Santa Claus delivers presents to all good children in a single night, that the tooth fairy comes in and pays kids money for teeth left under their pillows, that white conservative Christians helped 'civilize' native Americans bringing them many benefits, but they leave out the hundreds of broken treaties and thousands of broken promises, the stealing of their sacred lands, the murders and rape of indigenous people and the forced conversions of natives to Christianity, and to contradict with their white conservative Christian fantasy history is like slapping them in the face which apparently is why Piscopo looks like an over-baked ham.

 
 
 
Veronica
Senior Guide
1.2.1  Veronica  replied to  Dismayed Patriot @1.2    2 months ago

jrSmiley_81_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Greg Jones
PhD Expert
1.3  Greg Jones  replied to  JohnRussell @1    2 months ago

JR wrote: "He DOES NOT mention them as one of the groups that contribute to the greatness of America."

How did Native Americans, as a group, contribute to the greatness of America?

Educate us.

 
 
 
1stwarrior
Professor Guide
1.3.1  1stwarrior  replied to  Greg Jones @1.3    2 months ago

The Constitution ring a bell?

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Junior Quiet
1.3.3  Jack_TX  replied to    2 months ago
There are many contemptible comments and queries that one may encounter on these sites, but this one may be the most reprehensible. 

It's a perfectly legitimate question.

If you believe Native Americans as a group have contributed to the greatness of America, you shouldn't have difficulty describing that.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.3.4  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Jack_TX @1.3.3    2 months ago
If you believe Native Americans as a group have contributed to the greatness of America

You could ask that about any ethnic group.

 
 
 
Veronica
Senior Guide
1.3.5  Veronica  replied to  Jack_TX @1.3.3    2 months ago
It's a perfectly legitimate question.

It is not - it simply a throwout statement to get people pissed & flagged.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
1.3.6  Split Personality  replied to  Greg Jones @1.3    2 months ago

How the Iroquois Great Law of Peace Shaped U.S. Democracy

The Iroquois Confederacy, founded by the Great Peacemaker in 1142 1 , is the oldest living participatory democracy on earth 2 . In 1988, the U.S. Senate paid tribute with a resolution 3  that said, "The confederation of the original 13 colonies into one republic was influenced by the political system developed by the Iroquois Confederacy, as were many of the democratic principles which were incorporated into the constitution itself."

Pretty important....and then there's all that medicine...

7 Native American Inventions That Revolutionized Medicine And Public Health

Enough?

5 Surprising Places to Find Native American Influence in History

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Junior Quiet
1.3.7  Jack_TX  replied to  JohnRussell @1.3.4    2 months ago
You could ask that about any ethnic group.

Absolutely.  And most members of most ethnic groups can give you a proud answer. 

Why would it be different with Native Americans?

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.3.8  Texan1211  replied to  JohnRussell @1.3.4    2 months ago
You could ask that about any ethnic group.

He could, but didn't.

Doesn't seem like that hard of a question to elicit the replies to it that it has.

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Junior Quiet
1.3.10  Jack_TX  replied to  Split Personality @1.3.6    2 months ago

Exactly my point.  

Out of curiosity, how long did that take you?   A few seconds?  I'd wager there is a lot more that you didn't post.

So this business about how the question is somehow "contemptible" is complete bullshit. 

Every ethnic group has its proud story about how those people have made a difference, and if you're a proud member of that group you should be able to tell it.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
1.3.11  Split Personality  replied to  Split Personality @1.3.6    2 months ago

Sorry it took 29 minutes Gregg,

being I was on the phone the whole time with a client while sending and answering emails in my real occupation.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.3.12  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Jack_TX @1.3.7    2 months ago

Native American Contributions 

 Did you know that Native Americans have contributed many things to the 
American way of life today? Things that you use or do now, many Native Americans 
have been using and doing for many, many years. 

 Many times, the only thing people remember about Native Americans are the 
negative things-but they contribute many positive things and should be remembered for 
them. A lot of time, we only think about things we can readily identify as representing 
Native Americans, such as their fine art work. Yes-the people of the Southwest are 
known for their beautiful silver and turquoise jewelry. The people of the Northwest 
Coast are known for their fantastic woodcarvings. The Plains Indians are well known for 
their beautiful beadwork. 

 But other than art, the Native Americans have influenced many areas of 
American living. Some of these things were begun long before the arrival of the 
European settlers on North American land. 

 DID YOU KNOW THAT ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT ASPECTS OF 
NATIVE AMERICAN LIFE IS ECOLOGY? People of today have just begun to think 
about this. The Native Americans have always had a deep respect for the land. There 
was a love of every form of life. The Native Americans did not kill anything they could 
not use. They never killed an animal or a fish for the sport of it. Fishing and hunting 
were a way to survive. The Native Americans lived in harmony with nature and did not 
abuse the natural world. Native Americans were ecologists long before they were ever 
used. The Anishinaabe people do not have a word for “Conservation”, because it is an 
assumed way of life, it did not have to have a special word. 

 DID YOU KNOW THAT MANY OF THE FOODS WE EAT TODAY WERE FIRST 
GROWN BY NATIVE AMERICANS? Native Americans learned to grow and use many 
different kinds of food that many people eat today, never considering that they first 
came from Native Americans: potatoes, beans, corn, peanuts, pumpkins, tomatoes, 
squash, peppers, nuts, melons, and sunflower seeds. They also helped the European 
settlers survive in the New World by sharing their farming methods with them. 

 DID YOU KNOW THAT MANY OF THE GAMES YOU PLAY TODAY CAME 
FROM NATIVE AMERICANS? Canoeing, snowshoeing, tobogganing, lacrosse, relay 
races, tug-of-wars, and ball games are just a few of the games early Native Americans 
played and still enjoy today. Many youth groups such as Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, 
Campfire and YMCA Guides have programs based largely on Native American crafts 
and lore. 

 DID YOU KNOW THAT THE IDEA FOR THE U.S. GOVERNMENT WAS 
ADOPTED FROM THE NATIVE AMERICANS? Benjamin Franklin said that the idea of 
the federal government, in which certain powers are given to a central government and 
all other powers are reserved for the states, was borrowed from the system of 
government used by the Iroquoian League of Nations. 

 DID YOU KNOW THAT MANY WORDS WE USE EVERY DAY CAME FROM 
NATIVE AMERICANS? Countless Native American words and inventions have become 
an everyday part of our language and use. Some of these include: barbecue, caribou, 
chipmunk, woodchuck, hammock, toboggan, skunk, mahogany, hurricane, and 
moccasin. Many towns, cities and rivers have names of Native American origin. Just a 
few of these include: Seattle, Spokane, Yakima, Pocatello, Chinook, Flathead Lake, 
Milwaukee, Ottawa, Miami, Wichita, and Kalispell. 

 DID YOU KNOW THAT NATIVE AMERICANS DEVELOPED AND 
COMMUNICATED WITH SIGN LANGUAGE? A system of hand signals was developed 
to facilitate trade and communicate between different tribal groups and later between 
Native Americas and trappers and traders. The same idea is used today for 
communicating with those who are deaf and unable to speak. The signs are different, 
but the idea is the same. 

 DID YOU KNOW THAT MANY NATIVE AMERICANS SERVED DURING 
WORLD WAR I, WORLD WAR II AND OTHER CAMPAIGNS?

Even though many of them were not even citizens, more than 8,000 Native Americans volunteered and served during World War I. Well over 24,000 served during World War II. One of the most notable contributions during World War II was the service of the Navajo Code Talkers, a special group of volunteers who did top-secret work using a secret code in Navajo that could not be broken. 

 DID YOU KNOW THAT INDIANS AS INDIVIDUALS HAVE EXCELLED IN MANY 
FIELDS? Jim Thorpe (athlete), Billy Mills (athlete), Johnny Bench (athlete), Charles 
Curtis (vice president of U.S.), Maria Tallchief (ballerina), Johnny Cash (entertainer), 
Buffy St. Marie (musician) and Will Rogers (entertainer)… these are just a few. With 
some research, the list could be extended to include someone in every area and walk of 
life. 

Native American Contributions 

 Many Students, as well as adults, do not know of the contributions made by the 
American Indian. The contributions cover a wide spectrum of American culture. It is 
most important that children be made aware of such information not only to erase 
generalizations, but also to make them aware of the importance of the Native American 
in the historical and contemporary settling of American. 

 FOODS                                                   PRODUCTS 
 Corn                                                       Canoe 
 Popcorn                                                 Tobaggan 
 Wild rice                                                 Snow shoes 
 Bean (14 varieties)                                Moccasins 
 Squash                                                    Tipi 
 Pumpkins                                               Kayak 
 Cranberries                                           Fringed buckskin jacket 
 Maple sugar and syrup                         Coonskin caps 
 Potatoes (white and sweet)                  Mukluks 
 Turkeys                                                 Lacrosse 
 Clam bakes                                           Cradle boards (baby carriers) 
 Pemmican                                              Tomahawk 
 Jerky                                                     Tobacco 
 Tomatoes                                               Cigars 
 Pineapples                                            Pipe smoking 
 Avocado                                                Cotton 
 Tapioca (Manioc)                                  Rubber 
 Chocolate (Cacao)                               Quinine 
 Peanuts 
 Chewing gum 
 Vanilla 
 Wild rice 

 
 60% of the present world’s food supply comes from the American Indians’ 
agriculture, primarily consisting of corn and the so-called “Irish” potatoes. Thousands of 
American Indian names dot our maps in states, cities, counties, lakes, mountains and 
rivers, and hundreds of Indian names are used as trade names for modern 
manufactured products, etc. 
 Indian art, designs and styles have strongly influenced modern design, 
architecture and music. 
 Modern youth groups such as Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Campfire Girls and the 
YMCA Indian Guides, all include programs based largely on Indian lore, arts and crafts, 
character building and outdoor campcraft and living. 
 Past American Indian civilizations (Inca, Mayan and Aztec) plus the Iroquois 
Confederacy have influenced our very form of democratic government, the Iroquois 
Confederacy being copied by Benjamin Franklin when he drafted our Federation of 
States. Truly, we may state our form of government is “American.” 
 Besides the recognized contributions such as corn, squash, etc, the most 
important contribution is the Indian’s value system. They placed emphasis and 
importance on: 
Respect for Mother Earth (Ecology), 
Respect for Fellow Man ( No Prejudice), 
Respect for the Great Spirit (God), generosity, sharing (no material acquisitions), 
honest leadership selection, bravery, courage, 
respect for the aged, family tradition, 
no religious animosity, 
no major wars (no Indian nation destroyed another), 
 also there were thousands of years of peace (before 1492); 
no tranquilizers, drugs, alcohol, ulcers, 
no poor, no rich, 
no insane asylums, 
no jails, prisons, lawyers, taxes, borders or boundaries, 
no germ warfare (smallpox infected blankets), 
and no complete annihilation weapons (Hydrogen bomb). 
 The Native American has influenced many areas of the American way of life, 
from art and music, to law and government. Some other areas are: 
1. Indians served as guides in the early exploration of this hemisphere. Their 
Trails became the roads and railroads over which the settlers advanced in 
search of new homes. 
 
2. The log cabin was an adaptation of the Indian log or longhouse. 
3. Sites of Indian villages advantageously located on waterways and trails 
became trading posts, then villages. Later they became the modern cities 
of Chicago, Detroit, St. Louis, Kansas City, Pittsburgh, Pocatello, and 
countless others. 
4. Fur traders visited Indian villages and held rendezvous. Their reports 
encouraged the land hungry and adventurous people to move farther and 
farther inland. 
5. The Indians assisted the English, French, Spanish and peoples of other 
European countries in the struggle for control of the new country. 
 
6. The Indian has been immortalized in song, painting, art and sculpture. 
7. Symbols such as the totem pole, thunderbird, sun and tepees, as well as 
the Indian’s love for color have had a prominent place in developing 
modern design. 
8. Indian Knowledge of areas where fine clays, used in making pottery and 
china, has been passed to the white man and this was the beginning of 
the manufacturing of fine porcelain ware. 
9. Indians cultivated and developed many plants that are very important in 
the world today. Some of them are white and sweet potatoes, corn, 
beans, tobacco, chocolate, peanuts, cotton, rubber and gum. Plants were 
also used for dyes, medicines, soap, clothes, shelters and baskets. 
10. Many places in the United States have names of Indian origin. 
Approximately half of our states have Indian names. 
11. Some Idaho names of Indian origin include: Pocatello, Tendoy, Bannock, 
Camas, Lemhi, Shoshone, Inkom, Kamiah, Potlatch, Nez Perce, Oneida 
and Minidoka. 
12. Countless Indian words have become a part of the English language. 
Some sample words are: barbecue, cannibal, caribou, chipmunk, 
chocolate, cougar, hammock, hurricane, mahogany, moose, opossum, 
potato, skunk, squash, toboggan and woodchuck. 
13. Games and recreational activities developed by Indians include: 
canoeing, tobogganing, snowshoeing, lacrosse, cat’s cradle and bull roar. 
14. Indians also have contributed a great deal to farming methods. The white 
settlers in colonial America might have starved if they had not copied 
Indian farming methods. At least one tribe, the Pima, had a welldeveloped irrigation system. 
15. Benjamin Franklin said that our idea of the federal government, in which 
certain powers are conferred on a central government, and all other 
powers reserved to the states, was borrowed from the system of 
government of the Iroquoian League. 
16. Indians were loyal in supporting the United States as shown by the high 
ratio of enlistment during the wars. Their work with the Signal Corps 
during World War II is an outstanding example. 
17. Listed below are the names of our states which are of Indian derivation. 
ALABAMA From the Alibamu, the name of Muskogean 
tribe, meaning “those who clear land for 
agricultural purposes.” 
ARIZONA From the Papago word, Airzonac, which 
probably means “small springs.” 
ARKANSAS From Akansea, a tribe whose name means 
“downstream people.” 
CONNECTICUT Meaning “river whose water is driven by tides 
or winds.” 
DAKOTA (North and South) Tribal name of the Sioux 
meaning “Allies.” 
ILLINOIS Meaning “Men,” the name of a confederacy of 
Algonquian tribes. 
IOWA The name of a tribe meaning “Sleepy Ones.” 
 
KENTUCKY Said to be derived from the word “Kenta,” 
meaning “Field” or “Meadow.” 
MASSACHUSETTS Name of an Algonquian tribe meaning “At or 
About the Great Hill.” 
MICHIGAN From the Indian word “Michigamea, meaning 
“Great Water.” 
MINNESOTA A Dakota word meaning “Whitish or Sky-tinted 
water.” 
 
MISSISSIPPI Algonquian word “misi” meaning “Great,” and 
“sipi,” meaning “water.” 
MISSOURI From the name of a tribe meaning “Great 
Muddy,” which refers to the river. 
NEBRASKA From an Oto word meaning “Broad Water.” 
NEW MEXICO Name of an Aztec god, “Meritili.” 
OHIO Iroquois word meaning “Beautiful River.” 
OKLAHOMA A Choctaw word meaning “Red People.” 
TENNESSEE The name of Cherokee settlement, the 
meaning unknown. 
TEXAS The name of a group of tribes meaning 
“Friends,” or “Allies.” 
UTAH From the tribal name of the “Ute,” meaning 
unknown. 
WISCONSIN The name of a group of tribes living on the 
Wisconsin River. 

Microsoft Word - contributions 1.doc (usda.gov)

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.3.13  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Texan1211 @1.3.8    2 months ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Junior Quiet
1.3.14  Jack_TX  replied to  JohnRussell @1.3.12    2 months ago

Didn't take you long, either.

So what makes us think we need to protect Native Americans from questions about their contributions?  

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.3.15  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Jack_TX @1.3.14    2 months ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1.3.16  Kavika   replied to  Jack_TX @1.3.3    2 months ago
It's a perfectly legitimate question.

Yes it is and I would have thought that some of them would have been taught in school, but it seems that's not the case. 

1. The Iroquois and the Great Law of Peace. 

The Iroquois Confederacy, founded by the Great Peacemaker in 1142 1 , is the oldest living participatory democracy on earth 2 . In 1988, the U.S. Senate paid tribute with a resolution 3  that said, "The confederation of the original 13 colonies into one republic was influenced by the political system developed by the Iroquois Confederacy, as were many of the democratic principles which were incorporated into the constitution itself."

2.  Chief Shenandoah, Polly Cooper and the Oneida (Americas first Allies)

3. Numerous inventions with probably the most important one (s) would be as follows. 

American Pharmacopia. files.eric.ed

4. The Navajo Code Talkers, you've probably heard of them and their contribution but there were 31 other tribes that had code talkers in the US military in WWI, WWII, Korea and Vietnam

5.     Native Americans learned to grow and use many different kinds of food that many people eat today, never considering that they first came from Native Americans: potatoes, beans, corn, peanuts, pumpkins, tomatoes, squash, peppers, nuts, melons and sunflower seeds. 

6. American's first prima ballerina, Maria Tallchief. A fascinating person and her and the four moons contributions to the American Dance scene are powerful.

I could go on but that's a good start.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.3.17  Texan1211  replied to  Jack_TX @1.3.14    2 months ago
So what makes us think we need to protect Native Americans from questions about their contributions? 

A whole lot of misplaced white guilt?

LOL!

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
1.3.18  Split Personality  replied to  Jack_TX @1.3.10    2 months ago

My issue with Gregg's comment is the tone, it's obviously snarky and in disagreement with JR.

And Gregg logged off a few seconds later uninterested in any dialogue or answers.

He was just throwing a Baby Ruth in the swimming pool, so to speak.

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Junior Quiet
1.3.19  Jack_TX  replied to  JohnRussell @1.3.15    2 months ago

Who's trolling now, John?

If you're too fucking thick to realize what's happening here, what we've established is that Native Americans are perfectly capable of coming into a discussion about "what have you contributed" with a list as long as your arm. Had you actually bothered to read that thing you copied and pasted, you'd understand that.

They do not need protection on that front, any more that Jim Thorpe needed a head start in the 100yd dash at the Olympics.

Asking them that question is no more reprehensible or contemptible or offensive than it would be to ask it of me about my English ancestors or my wife about her Mexican ones any Italian, Irishman, German, or anybody else.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.3.20  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Jack_TX @1.3.19    2 months ago

Of course I read what I posted. I read everything I post, before I post it. 

So what makes us think we need to protect Native Americans from questions about their contributions? 

What makes you think that I , or anyone else here, think Native Americans need to be protected from questions about their contributions ? 

Here is what Greg said

JR wrote: "He DOES NOT mention them as one of the groups thatcontribute to the greatness of America."

How did Native Americans,as a group, contribute to the greatness of America?

Educate us.

Greg gives us the hint that he believes maybe there are no such "contributions". 

Here is what you said right after that

It's a perfectly legitimate question. If you believe Native Americans as a group have contributed to the greatness of America, you shouldn't have difficulty describing that.

Why should Native Americans be required to list what their contributions have been to America any more than any other ethnic group would be? 

It's a "legitimate question" ? In the context of what is going on on this seed , I dont see it that way. It sounds like telling AI they have to justify themselves as Americans. 

 
 
 
1stwarrior
Professor Guide
1.3.21  1stwarrior  replied to  Jack_TX @1.3.3    2 months ago

Jack - read the U.S. Constitution - a very good part of it is/was taken from the Iroquois Confederacy's Tree of Life.  The Founding Fathers thought quite a bit good about it which is why they included/adapted the language.

Good enough contribution?

 
 
 
1stwarrior
Professor Guide
1.3.22  1stwarrior  replied to  Jack_TX @1.3.7    2 months ago

It's extremely obvious that you don't know about/any Native Americans.

Confrontation - ya know the word????  We don't like it and we don't do it (except for a few of us).  That's why you don't see a parade of responses to that FORM of question.  That question is a slap in the face because of the way we are/were raised and the manner we hold others up to.

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Junior Quiet
1.3.23  Jack_TX  replied to  JohnRussell @1.3.20    2 months ago
What makes you think that I , or anyone else here, think Native Americans need to be protected from questions about their contributions ? 

The second response to "the question" was

There are many contemptible comments and queries that one may encounter on these sites, but this one may be the most reprehensible. 

The rest of the comments have been a continual stream of why there is nothing wrong with the question.

Greg gives us the hint that he believes maybe there are no such "contributions". 

He may have believed that, I don't know.  But he gave you the chance to prove that idea wrong and several of you took him up on it.  How is this not a win?

Why should Native Americans be required to list what their contributions have been to America any more than any other ethnic group would be? 

As we already agreed 15 comments ago, it isn't any different...

Absolutely.  And most members of most ethnic groups can give you a proud answer.  Why would it be different with Native Americans?
 
 
 
1stwarrior
Professor Guide
1.3.24  1stwarrior  replied to  Texan1211 @1.3.17    2 months ago

I know you meant that sarcastically and, of course, forgot the slash tag.

But, you hit the nail on the head - a whole lot of misplaced white guilt.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.3.25  Texan1211  replied to  1stwarrior @1.3.24    2 months ago

Sorry, I am not one of those who feel some mythical "white guilt" over stuff I had no control of.

I'll leave that to the progressive liberals, it seems to make them feel better about themselves if they can claim they are guilty of something.

 
 
 
bugsy
Professor Guide
1.3.26  bugsy  replied to  JohnRussell @1.3.20    2 months ago
I read everything I post, before I post it. 

But do you understand it...and the ridicule you would receive from it?

 
 
 
bugsy
Professor Guide
1.3.27  bugsy  replied to  Texan1211 @1.3.25    2 months ago
they can claim they are guilty of something.

Pretty much EVERYTHING they claim conservatives and republicans are doing.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
PhD Expert
1.3.28  Greg Jones  replied to  Split Personality @1.3.6    2 months ago

That wasn't so hard, was it? 

I was playing devils advocate. It was a legitimate question on my part trying to elicit some well thought out examples to the author's vague and generalized comment.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
1.3.29  Split Personality  replied to  Greg Jones @1.3.28    2 months ago

Yes Gregg it was so easy I believe YOU could have done it and saved us the angst and drama.

Keep reading. maybe you will learn something.

And thanks for the edit to a more intelligent response,

appreciate it.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1.3.30  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  bugsy @1.3.26    2 months ago

[Deleted]

 
 
 
Greg Jones
PhD Expert
1.3.31  Greg Jones  replied to  Split Personality @1.3.29    2 months ago

It worked, didn't it? Sorry about your angst.

 
 
 
bugsy
Professor Guide
1.3.32  bugsy  replied to  JohnRussell @1.3.30    2 months ago
You would be better off not saying anything than opening your mouth and revealing your vast limitations.

That was funny...but not really intelligent

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Junior Quiet
1.3.33  Jack_TX  replied to  1stwarrior @1.3.21    2 months ago
Jack - read the U.S. Constitution - a very good part of it is/was taken from the Iroquois Confederacy's Tree of Life.  The Founding Fathers thought quite a bit good about it which is why they included/adapted the language. Good enough contribution?

Absolutely.  That's my point.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
1.3.34  Split Personality  replied to  Greg Jones @1.3.31    2 months ago

All I did was post things you could learn from,

as requested.

You're welcome.

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Expert
2  Sean Treacy    2 months ago

He didn’t mention the Irish!  Disgusting!

How will I get through today knowing a washed up actor didn’t name check every possible ethnic group when discussing ethnic pluralism in America?    Let’s riot over this massive insult!

I see a cop was  murdered after a traffic stop yesterday. Small potatoes when compared to the disgusting offense  joe piscipo committed though.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2.1  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Sean Treacy @2    2 months ago

Sean, you dont have to be intelligent to know that the controversy surrounding Columbus Day relates to the historic disregarding of the opinions of Native-Americans concerning Columbus.  So Joe Piscopo should know. 

Anyone but a clueless Eurocentric moron would have known that on this of all days Native-Americans should be included in descriptions of America. 

Your distraction about a cop being murdered is irrelevant to the topic. 

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
Professor Expert
2.1.1  Sean Treacy  replied to  JohnRussell @2.1    2 months ago
Your distraction about a cop being murdered is irrelevant to the topic.

It's an example of the type of act that should provoke outrage, not the bromides of an actor who hasn't been relevant since Ronald Reagan's first term.  

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2.1.2  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Sean Treacy @2.1.1    2 months ago

I couldnt care less about Joe Piscopo, other than he was the one interviewed today by Fox News. 

How did you like the touch of having the host compare objections to Columbus Day to the communists murdering millions of people in the 20th century? 

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
2.1.3  Texan1211  replied to  JohnRussell @2.1    2 months ago
Sean, you dont have to be intelligent to know that the controversy surrounding Columbus Day relates to the historic disregarding of the opinions of Native-Americans concerning Columbus.

So, what are the opinions of Native Americans concerning Columbus?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
PhD Expert
2.1.4  Greg Jones  replied to  Texan1211 @2.1.3    2 months ago

As usual, he has no idea

 
 
 
1stwarrior
Professor Guide
2.1.5  1stwarrior  replied to  Texan1211 @2.1.3    2 months ago

We never met him so we have no opinion of him - specifically.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
2.1.6  Texan1211  replied to  1stwarrior @2.1.5    2 months ago
We never met him so we have no opinion of him - specifically.

So Native Americans' opinions of Columbus hold no more validity than any other groups' opinions.

Seems weird to be complaining about Columbus then.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2.1.7  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Texan1211 @2.1.6    2 months ago

[deleted]

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
2.1.8  Texan1211  replied to  JohnRussell @2.1.7    2 months ago
Don't try and think too much, you might hurt yourself. 

Is that why you somehow COMPLETELY managed to avoid my question?

LOL

 
 
 
1stwarrior
Professor Guide
2.1.9  1stwarrior  replied to  Texan1211 @2.1.6    2 months ago

Oh - really??  No opinion?  Be glad to give you the opinion of many of the Native Americans I have discussed this with - but, to what benefit?

Columbus introduced our genocide to the Euro's - not too happy 'bout that.  He decimated over 2M Caribbean Indian's lives for loot, fame and grandeur.  His being white adds to the disfavor, bad taste in our mouths of the "Conquerors" who were/are also white.  He did show us that, even though we place great emphasis on discussion, in the white world, that doesn't seem possible without killing/taking/banishing/obliviating their opponent to get their point of dominance across.

Basically, he showed us that white society can't be trusted no matter what they say because their actions betray their words.

Wanna hear some more opinions?

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
2.1.10  Texan1211  replied to  1stwarrior @2.1.9    2 months ago
Oh - really??  No opinion?  Be glad to give you the opinion of many of the Native Americans I have discussed this with - but, to what benefit?

Please reread my post. I said absolutely nothing about no opinion.

 
 
 
1stwarrior
Professor Guide
2.1.11  1stwarrior  replied to  Texan1211 @2.1.10    2 months ago

So, what are the opinions of Native Americans concerning Columbus?

The question is a statement of rhetoric that more implies than differentiates.  The question, as written, "implies" NA's have no opinion of Columbus.

You got your answer.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
2.1.12  Texan1211  replied to  1stwarrior @2.1.11    2 months ago
The question is a statement of rhetoric that more implies than differentiates.  The question, as written, "implies" NA's have no opinion of Columbus.

No, THAT is merely your interpretation of a legitimate question.

And in FACT, YOUR reply is that NA have NO opinion on it:

We never met him so we have no opinion of him - specifically.

Feel free to correct my quote of your words if it is inaccurate in any way.

 
 
 
1stwarrior
Professor Guide
2.1.13  1stwarrior  replied to  Texan1211 @2.1.12    2 months ago

Sorry Tex, but you seem like you're gonna be rambunctious and feisty 'bout that ONE question.

So, let's do this - the Native Americans that I know have NO opinion on Christopher Columbus.

What we do have opinions on deal with the razing of our lands, people, economy, religions, culture, traditions and heritage and, according to our cultures/traditions, there we do our best to keep those issues to ourselves.  We voice our opinions to our Clan leaders/Tribal leaders and Elders and allow them to take whatever actions/steps/voices they believe are necessary for the benefit of our/the people.

We do have opinions regarding the theft of 1.5B acres of our lands - the curtailment of our natural resources - the rape/pillaging of our villages - mass massacres of our people - stealing our children by the whites to make them white - stealing our children in total violation of Fed laws (ICWA/VAWA) because "they're cute"/"we'll give you a better life"/"your parents aren't good parents - let us take care of you" - and numerous other "trivial" "I'm your God" activities.  

Oh yeah - we've also got opinions on the 80% of Native Women who have/will get raped by a non-Indian person (read that to be a white person) - most of our reservations don't have running water/electricity even though the White treaty we were forced to sign sez all of our people will have those things, along with medical care, infrastructure, housing, schools and engineers - over 60% of Native Americans on many reservations live in poverty and unemployment is at 45 - 80%

And we say to ourselves - Self, ya know it wasn't like this before - then the white guys showed up and decided that their Godship overruled societies that had/have existed for over 25,000 years - quite damn well, in fact.  Why did they show up??  What/who gave them the idea that they could control every single aspect of our lives - the Church?????  Quite simply, the answer is that - Well, they're white and they believe that whites should and will rule over all and everything not matter what anyone else sez.

Columbus?  He was an explorer - hell, the Indian tribes/nations understand what an explorer is - we got lots of them.  As an explorer, he did what explorers do - he explored an area that everyone said there was nothing - and he found something.

But, we don't fault him for his findings.  We had/have a hard time believing the stories on the Indian grapevine telling of the atrocities that had been done "down South".  We started building our defenses up 'cause you never know when some hard charger is gonna try to pull the same stunts/activities to the tribes/nations that resulted from Columbus's findings.

Most of us have nothing against the man for his exploring activity - but - we do have a lot against any person/country/tribe/nation who attempts to pull the same stunt on us - and, I can tell you - it ain't gonna happen in today's world.

That's where our opinions are.

 
 
 
Jack_TX
Junior Quiet
2.2  Jack_TX  replied to  Sean Treacy @2    2 months ago
How will I get through today knowing a washed up actor didn’t name check every possible ethnic group when discussing ethnic pluralism in America?    Let’s riot over this massive insult!

Will there be Irish whiskey involved in this riot.  If so, what time and where?

 
 
 
Veronica
Senior Guide
3  Veronica    2 months ago

Typical tunnel vision.  Complaining about Columbus Day is an insult to all Italian Americans?  Really?  Columbus's own country threw him away - that is why he sailed for Spain.  

Not to mention the moron left all of my ethnicities - English, Irish, Scottish and Polish.  So all my ancestors contributed nothing to the building of America.  

Not to mention Columbus didn't discover "America".  Sigh - "what a maroon" - as Bugs would say.

Not to mention the people already living here when the Europeans descended like locusts.  

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
3.1  Split Personality  replied to  Veronica @3    2 months ago

Does Piscopo look like he's alcohol poisoned or what?

 
 
 
Veronica
Senior Guide
3.1.1  Veronica  replied to  Split Personality @3.1    2 months ago

He does look a little grizzled.

 
 
 
Gordy327
Professor Principal
3.1.2  Gordy327  replied to  Veronica @3.1.1    2 months ago

I didn't know he was still alive.

 
 
 
Veronica
Senior Guide
3.1.3  Veronica  replied to  Gordy327 @3.1.2    2 months ago

Is he?  Maybe he is one of the "undead".

 
 
 
Gordy327
Professor Principal
3.1.4  Gordy327  replied to  Veronica @3.1.3    2 months ago

I don't know.i think the last time I saw him, he guest starred on an episode of Star Trek: TNG.

 
 
 
Veronica
Senior Guide
3.1.5  Veronica  replied to  Gordy327 @3.1.4    2 months ago

I don't think I saw that episode.  

 
 
 
Gordy327
Professor Principal
3.1.6  Gordy327  replied to  Veronica @3.1.5    2 months ago

Season 2, episode 4: The Outrageous Okana. It also featured Teri Hatcher in an early role for her, when she was still relatively unknown.

 
 
 
Veronica
Senior Guide
3.1.7  Veronica  replied to  Gordy327 @3.1.6    2 months ago

Hmmm..I will have to revisit that.

 
 
 
Gordy327
Professor Principal
3.1.8  Gordy327  replied to  Veronica @3.1.7    2 months ago

It was a somewhat more lighthearted episode. Probably one of the more forgettable episodes of the series.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
3.2  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Veronica @3    2 months ago

I have the Columbus Day Parade here in Chicago on the tv right now, the local ABC station is showing it. 

A little while ago the announcers pointed out something interesting.  About a third to a half of the marching units and floats are not representing Italian American groups , they are a variety of ethnic groups (Greek, Polish, Filipino, German, etc etc. ).   I am sure this is new or recent to the Columbus Day parade.  Why would this be? All these costumed ethnic marchers and performers in a Columbus Day parade always dedicated to Italian heritage? 

Same reason I think that Joe Piscopo brings up the "immigrant experience" in the video and mentions various ethnic groups  -  to make the claim that Columbus day is a good thing because Columbus was the first immigrant and paved the way for all subsequent immigrants. It is a way to try and dilute from the impact of people describing Columbus as a rapist and murderer and slaver.  

So now Columbus was an "immigrant" , and who doesnt like immigrants?  Switching an emphasis of Columbus Day to the honoring of immigrants is a way to try and save the day for the Italians. 

 
 
 
Veronica
Senior Guide
3.2.1  Veronica  replied to  JohnRussell @3.2    2 months ago

Columbus day is a rotten thing, in my opinion.  And should not be a national holiday.  But that is just me - I don't celebrate it.  

 
 
 
zuksam
Junior Silent
3.2.2  zuksam  replied to  JohnRussell @3.2    2 months ago

Columbus never set foot in North America, the only part of the USA he ever visited was Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands.

 
 
 
JBB
Professor Principal
4  JBB    2 months ago

original

 
 
 
1stwarrior
Professor Guide
4.1  1stwarrior  replied to  JBB @4    2 months ago

A little bit of Red Jacket woulda been good too :-)

Great find JBB - thanks.

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
4.1.1  Split Personality  replied to  1stwarrior @4.1    2 months ago

Interesting bit of history but Tecumseh and his warriors did themselves no favors by wearing parts of

British red uniforms, it simply did not match their style of combat and cost them many lives 

at Detroit, the Thames River final Battle.

 
 
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