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Veterans are less likely to support hate or extreme political groups : NPR

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  evilgenius  •  last year  •  15 comments

By:   Quil Lawrence (NPR)

Veterans are less likely to support hate or extreme political groups : NPR
A RAND Corporation survey found that Americans who served in the military support extremist views at rates lower than nonveterans.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


May 23, 20235:04 AM ET Heard on Morning Edition
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Quil Lawrence

Survey: Surprising to some, veterans are less likely to support extremism


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The Pentagon continues to investigate the case of Air National Guardsman Jack Teixeira, accused of leaking sensitive intelligence. The military apparently missed signs that Teixeira was possibly stockpiling guns and   preparing for a race war .

Last week Pentagon officials admitted that   they only implemented one of six major recommendations   to counter extremism in the ranks. And the recent guilty plea of an active duty   Marine who broke into the capital on Jan. 6 , 2021, gives the impression that veterans and some military fill the ranks of extremist groups in America.


But those individual cases give the wrong overall impression, according to a new nationwide survey  of veterans by the RAND Corporation, a nonpartisan think tank.


"We found that support for extremist groups and also extremist ideologies were lower than what we see in representative surveys of the general public," said Todd Helmus, a senior behavioral scientist at RAND.

Extremist groups recruiting from the military and the veterans community has been on the Pentagon's radar for years. In the wake of the Jan. 6 riots, significant numbers of veterans were charged, and many media reports suggested this was a nationwide phenomenon.


But the actual number of military members and veterans with extremist links turned out much lower than many expected, Helmus says. Still, the narrative had been established.

"Those initial reports spurred a lot of fear and concern," he said. "But no one's actually looked at the numbers."

Below the national average


RAND conducted a national survey of almost 1,000 veterans. One percent of veterans reported support for white supremacy, compared to nonveterans at 7%. Vets voiced support for the far-right Proud Boys at 4%, compared to nonveterans at 9%.

While the vast majority of deadly political violence in America   comes from the far right , RAND also surveyed views about Antifa. About 10% of the general public said they support the far-left movement, while only 5.5% of veterans said they support Antifa.


Violent extremist groups do look to recruit veterans for their skill set, Brown says.


"Vets on average seem to be very resilient to those efforts. And so I think that some of the characteristics that draw you to serve your country will help protect against forces that would undermine your country," he said.

Brown and Helmus are not veterans, and said they were pleasantly surprised by the findings. Former U.S. Marine Joe Plenzler was not surprised.

"If veterans are overrepresented in the Jan. 6 mob, it's important to remember that they're also overrepresented in the halls of Congress. They're overrepresented in state legislatures, they're overrepresented in town councils," Plenzler says.


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evilone
Professor Guide
1  seeder  evilone    last year

I'm thinking any surprise this brings to people is because of a bubble effect from where they get their news. 

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
2  Kavika     last year

Sadly there are some but as the Rand study shows it's nowhere near the number that is thrown around.

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
2.1  seeder  evilone  replied to  Kavika @2    last year

With the rise of populism everything has become such a black and white discussion. Those same people go out of their way to uphold their pretzel logic stance, like the very fabric of the universe depends on it.

 
 
 
JBB
Professor Principal
3  JBB    last year

Yes, we have seen potty chair generals wearing Depends talking about, "If I was the President"...

original

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
3.1  seeder  evilone  replied to  JBB @3    last year

Try to stay on topic, please.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
4  Trout Giggles    last year

I'm not really surprised. You're a vet, aren't you, evil? Most of the people I knew in the military had their hearts in the right place and that was to serve our country. We mostly didn't give a fig who was in the White House as long as they were supportive of the military and came thru with the raises every year.

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
4.1  seeder  evilone  replied to  Trout Giggles @4    last year
You're a vet, aren't you, evil?

Yes. 

Most of the people I knew in the military had their hearts in the right place and that was to serve our country. We mostly didn't give a fig who was in the White House as long as they were supportive of the military and came thru with the raises every year.

As you say we were mostly concerned about completing our mission as safely as possible. It's a microcosm of the rest of the country for the most part. I had great leaders and co-workers - I also had some shitty leaders and co-workers. I miss the comradery, but there are many things I don't miss. 

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
5  Kavika     last year

I certainly agree with both EG and trout. I belong to a small group known as the 7 11 club. Our squad in the Nam, 11 went and 4 came out. I’m one of the four that came back. Now I’m the “last Indian standing”. We were a diverse group but as was mentioned we had a mission and we also covered each others six. In a few days we will honoring those that gave it all and I’ll make a trip to military cemetery an hour south of me and reflect on that time. Make a few phone calls to survivors and toast to each of the other 10. 
sorry got going off topic but it just popped out of me.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Participates
6  Greg Jones    last year

"While the vast majority of deadly political violence in America    comes from the far right  , RAND also surveyed views about Antifa. About 10% of the general public said they support the far-left movement, while only 5.5% of veterans said they support Antifa."

Vast majority?  I don't think so. Antifa and BLM violence was much in the news the last few years. Published reports of far right violence are few and far between.

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
6.1  seeder  evilone  replied to  Greg Jones @6    last year
Vast majority?  I don't think so. Antifa and BLM violence was much in the news the last few years. Published reports of far right violence are few and far between.

First, you are off topic. The topic of the article is Veterans' lack of support for extremist groups. Second, you didn't read the link you quoted did you?

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
6.1.1  Kavika   replied to  evilone @6.1    last year
Second, you didn't read the link you quoted did you?

Sure seems that he didn't....LOL

 
 
 
evilone
Professor Guide
6.1.2  seeder  evilone  replied to  Kavika @6.1.1    last year

Greg seems to exemplify my first post @1

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
6.1.3  Kavika   replied to  evilone @6.1.2    last year
Greg seems to exemplify my first post @1

Without a doubt.

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Professor Guide
7  Thrawn 31    last year

Stop trying to bring us into this bullshit. 

As a vet, I am sick and fucking tired of every political group trying to use us as props. 

Fuck you, give us our benefits and leave us the fuck alone. We did our part, more than 99% of you motherfuckers, leave us alone. 

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Expert
8  Buzz of the Orient    last year

I assume it has something to do with maturity.

 
 

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