Northern Hemisphere summer was hottest on record, scientists say

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  perrie-halpern  •  one week ago  •  19 comments

By:   Denise Chow

Northern Hemisphere summer was hottest on record, scientists say
The Northern Hemisphere just sweltered through its hottest summer on record, according to data released Monday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


The worrying milestones come as historic wildfires and extreme weather events in the U.S. have sharpened focus on global warming and the catastrophic impacts of climate change.

August was particularly steamy for the planet. Average global land and ocean surface temperatures last month surpassed the 20th-century average of 60.1 degrees by 1.69 degrees. This makes it the second-warmest August on record, trailing only August 2016, according to scientists at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information.

Some regions, however, felt the August heat more acutely. Last month ranked as the hottest August on record in North America, while it was the third hottest in Europe and the fourth hottest for South America and Oceania.

One-third of the U.S. faced at least a moderate level of drought conditions in August, and California suffered through a record-setting heat wave last month, after temperatures in Death Valley hit a sizzling 130 degrees.

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Southeastern China, parts of northern Russia and western Australia also experienced above-average temperatures last month, NOAA scientists wrote in their latest assessment.

The new figures suggest that the planet is continuing to warm at an accelerated pace. Globally, the five warmest Augusts have all occurred since 2015, and the 10 warmest Augusts on record have occurred since 1998, according to NOAA.

The above-average temperatures also shrank Arctic sea ice to its third-lowest level for August, agency scientists said. Satellite observations revealed that Arctic sea ice last month covered an average of 1.96 million square miles, which was more than 29 percent below average.


BREAKING: @NOAA reports that the #NorthernHemisphere just had its hottest summer on record and #August 2020 ended as 2nd hottest for the globe. Get more: https://t.co/aT3LTrMn7G#StateoftheClimate#climatepic.twitter.com/WKHSiOYbba
— NOAA Satellites - Public Affairs (@NOAASatellitePA) September 14, 2020

Antarctic sea ice, on the other hand, was close to normal for August, at 6.8 million square miles, the scientists said.

Though there are several months left in the year, 2020 is already shaping up to be one of the warmest on record. Scientists at the National Centers for Environmental Information predict that 2020 is "very likely" to rank among the five warmest years since NOAA began keeping such records 141 years ago.

Globally, the year to date already ranks as the second-hottest January-through-August time period, according to NOAA, with temperatures 1.85 degrees above the 20th-century average.


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Bob Nelson
1  Bob Nelson    one week ago

Meanwhile, the President of the United States of America continues to proclaim that climate change is not real. 

 
 
 
Gordy327
1.1  Gordy327  replied to  Bob Nelson @1    one week ago
the President of the United States of America continues to proclaim that climate change is not real. 

I'd say many of the willfully ignorant and/or scientifically illiterate continue to do so as well.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
1.1.1  Bob Nelson  replied to  Gordy327 @1.1    one week ago

He gives them cover. 

 
 
 
Gordy327
1.1.2  Gordy327  replied to  Bob Nelson @1.1.1    one week ago

And possibly encouragement.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
1.1.3  Bob Nelson  replied to  Gordy327 @1.1.2    one week ago

Certainly. 

 
 
 
MUVA
2  MUVA    one week ago

141 years of records on plane billions of years old is not even blip in time SCIENCE!

 
 
 
bccrane
2.1  bccrane  replied to  MUVA @2    one week ago

A year in which a pandemic caused less carbon emissions, windmills and solar panels up the wazoo, and it's still getting hotter, maybe science should be looking at some other reasons than just CO2.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
2.1.1  Bob Nelson  replied to  bccrane @2.1    one week ago

Methane?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
2.1.2  Greg Jones  replied to  Bob Nelson @2.1.1    one week ago

Cow pharts?

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
2.1.3  Bob Nelson  replied to  Greg Jones @2.1.2    one week ago

Actually, bovines release most of their methane by belching.

 
 
 
Ozzwald
2.2  Ozzwald  replied to  MUVA @2    one week ago
 
 
 
Greg Jones
3  Greg Jones    one week ago

We're simply in an interglacial period between ice ages.

Why were the 1930's so hot?

What caused the Little Ice Age? How can a handful more of CO2 molecules have such a large global impact

How much have the signers of the Paris agreement lived up to their commitments since the US is no longer footing the entire bill?

How does  ENSO, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), Rossby Waves, and latent heat influence or contribute to climate change.

So  many questions, so few practical answers

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
3.1  seeder  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Greg Jones @3    one week ago

Are you saying that human activity has no effect on the earth? 

 
 
 
Greg Jones
3.1.1  Greg Jones  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1    one week ago

It's been theorized that it does, but we have no idea of of how much, or how it can be mitigated. I hear Biden has a plan to make it stop.

 
 
 
Bob Nelson
3.2  Bob Nelson  replied to  Greg Jones @3    one week ago

Let's party!

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
4  Mark in Wyoming     one week ago

likely off topic  I will let the author decide.

i got curious and looked it up , about 90% of the entire human population of the planet is concentrated in what is considered the northern hemisphere.

I dont think anyone can deny that humanity can be a detriment to its own enviroment , and can have an adverse effect on where they live. the real question is , can they or do they actually have any real control over it and or the weather itself .

 
 
 
bccrane
4.1  bccrane  replied to  Mark in Wyoming @4    one week ago
concentrated in what is considered the northern hemisphere.

Which stands to reason as most of the landmass is in the northern hemisphere.

I dont think anyone can deny that humanity can be a detriment to its own enviroment , and can have an adverse effect on where they live. 

I agree, but now we are directly interfering with the atmosphere with windmills and the Earth's ability of reflecting light with solar panels.

 
 
 
Mark in Wyoming
4.1.1  Mark in Wyoming   replied to  bccrane @4.1    one week ago

I agree myself , i think the real debate is , how FAST does human interaction affect the climate, 30-40 years ago there were alarms that by this year we would be in the beginings of another "ice age" , personally i believe that this planet has never gone through a period where the climate and enviroment has NOT changed . And i believe it will continue to do so long after humans are gone.

 
 
 
Tessylo
5  Tessylo    one week ago

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