For Texas House Democrats, defeat on the voting bill was preordained - and they knew it

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  texan1211  •  3 weeks ago  •  8 comments

By:   John C. Moritz, Austin American-Statesman (MSN)

For Texas House Democrats, defeat on the voting bill was preordained - and they knew it
House Democrats had few cards to play when they left Texas to break quorum. And when they returned to the Capitol, Republicans dealt them out.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



It's a safe bet that when the Texas House Democrats fled the state July 12 to grind business in the chamber to a halt, they already knew what would happen Aug. 27.

Well, maybe not the exact date, but certainly how events would unfold despite their best efforts to stop them.

To no one's surprise, the GOP-dominated House on Friday advanced the controversial elections bill that Democrats had loudly proclaimed would tamp down turnout in minority communities. That's the reason so many House Democrats had bolted for Washington six weeks earlier to deny the 150-member chamber the 100 people present required by the Texas Constitution to act on legislation.

To no one's surprise, even after enough Democrats returned from their self-imposed exile to allow the House to get back to work, the Republicans shut down virtually every effort the Democrats offered to make the legislation more to their liking.

Many of the 40 or so Democrats in the chamber made impassioned speeches suggesting that outlawing drive-thru voting, cutting back on the hours and locations of early voting, and other provisions in Senate Bill 1 would effectively keep people away from the voting booth. They asked pointed questions, highlighted the finer points of the constitutional rights due all Americans and pretty much did all of the other things the losing side does in an emotional legislative debate.

But the outcome was preordained, and the Republicans — who chafed at the Democrats' absence, which kept the GOP members in Austin for much of the summer for two special sessions called by Gov. Greg Abbott — were not about to stop the train that will surely put their bill in the state's law books.

So what exactly did the Democrats who busted quorum, including the more than a dozen who have yet to return to the Capitol, accomplish between mid-July and late August?

Two of the party's House leaders, perhaps a bit ruefully, said that at least they called attention to the larger issue of voting rights. That they did. Their meetings in Washington with Vice President Kamala Harris, U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Charles Schumer were well covered, nationally and back home.

But calling attention is one thing. Changing minds is another. There's a truism in political reporting that goes: If one side is calling a news conference in the middle of a bitter partisan battle, it's an admission that the other side has the votes needed to win. Or at least that the outspoken side lacks the votes to stave off defeat.

And that's how the backstory in the Texas elections bill played out.

State Rep. Rafael Anchia, the Dallas Democrat who chairs the Mexican American Legislative Caucus and is one of the central players in the quorum bust, said after returning to the Capitol that he and his colleagues deserve some of the credit for the Democratic-run U.S. House on Tuesday finally taking up and passing the John Lewis Voting Rights Act.

The measure, named for the iconic civil rights leader and longtime Georgia congressman who died at 80 last year, would restore federal review of any changes in election law made in states that have a history of discrimination, including Texas.

"The vice president made it very, very clear her ask was to buy more time for Congress to act on meaningful federal voting rights legislation," Anchia said. "And we are convinced that the big success of the quorum break was to ... get those bills moving again."

Let's grant Anchia's point. The Texas Democrats' walkout helped fire up the party's national base. And a fired-up base is essential for partisan lawmakers to take action on whatever issue is fueling the flame. But the higher mountain to climb was to get the Senate, divided 50-50 with Harris as the tiebreaker, to move on federal voting rights legislation.

That would have meant getting one of the two center-right Senate Democrats — West Virginia's Joe Manchin and Arizona's Kyrsten Sinema — to agree to bypass the 60-vote filibuster. That hasn't happened and perhaps never will. So in the end, Texas Republicans got pretty much everything they wanted in the elections bill. It just took a little longer than they had hoped.

© File John Moritz

This article originally appeared on Austin American-Statesman: For Texas House Democrats, defeat on the voting bill was preordained - and they knew it


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Texan1211
Professor Principal
1  seeder  Texan1211    3 weeks ago

Texas Democrats can now celebrate their unparalleled "success".

 
 
 
XXJefferson51
Senior Guide
1.1  XXJefferson51  replied to  Texan1211 @1    3 weeks ago

Good.  I hope that they can be fined for the delay they caused by their actions spreading covid around Washington DC

 
 
 
Split Personality
PhD Principal
1.2  Split Personality  replied to  Texan1211 @1    3 weeks ago

What's the old adage, What goes around, comes around ?

Or is it the other way round?

Either way, intelligent politicians have always avoided passing BS laws for a long time to avoid the flip flop if the majority changes hands.

This just cements why certain unintelligent Republicans need to be retired permanently.

What goes around will come around again some day.

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
1.2.1  seeder  Texan1211  replied to  Split Personality @1.2    3 weeks ago
Either way, intelligent politicians have always avoided passing BS laws for a long time to avoid the flip flop if the majority changes hands.

This just cements why certain unintelligent Republican need to be retired permanently.

What goes around will come around again some day.

Maybe you can peddle those fantasies to some progressive liberals.

Or maybe the Democrats passed some laws and are unintelligent.

Calls for ending the filibuster, packing SCOTUS, wealth taxes, free shit, border crisis mishandling, screwing up in Afghanistan sure don't seem intelligent to me, but that is for damn sure what some Democrats are proposing, doing, or are responsible for.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Masters Quiet
1.2.2  Ronin2  replied to  Split Personality @1.2    3 weeks ago

What the hell do you call the Democrats in the House and Senate trying to put Federal laws in place to remove State's powers and run all elections?

Pot meet kettle.

The left is disingenuous as it gets.

 

 
 
 
Greg Jones
PhD Expert
1.2.3  Greg Jones  replied to  Ronin2 @1.2.2    3 weeks ago

Ronin2 wrote: "What the hell do you call the Democrats in the House and Senate trying to put Federal laws in place to remove State's powers and run all elections?"

I'd call it unconstitutional.

 
 
 
gooseisback
Freshman Silent
1.2.4  gooseisback  replied to  Split Personality @1.2    3 weeks ago
What goes around will come around again some day.

Truer words could not be spoken, wait till 2022!

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Principal
2  Hal A. Lujah    3 weeks ago

It’s good to know that the humongous problem of voter fraud in Texas will finally be put to rest.  Lol.  Idiots.

 
 
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