Business groups create new headache for Pelosi

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  just-jim-nc-ttth  •  3 weeks ago  •  5 comments

By:   Karl Evers-Hillstrom (MSN)

Business groups create new headache for Pelosi
Business groups are pressuring centrist Democrats to oppose their party's $3.5 trillion spending package that raises taxes on corporations, with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce warning it could pull endorsements for lawmakers in tough reelection races next year if they vote for the bill.The threat from the nation's biggest corporate lobbying group, which launched a six-figure ad campaign Wednesday targeting five centrists, puts even more pressure...

Rock and a hard place.


S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



Business groups are pressuring centrist Democrats to oppose their party's $3.5 trillion spending package that raises taxes on corporations, with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce warning it could pull endorsements for lawmakers in tough reelection races next year if they vote for the bill.

© istock Business groups create new headache for Pelosi

The threat from the nation's biggest corporate lobbying group, which launched a six-figure ad campaign Wednesday targeting five centrists, puts even more pressure on Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), whose caucus can only afford three defections when the sweeping legislation comes to the floor.

Corporate America has thrown its weight behind the Senate-passed $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill, which does not include tax hikes, while rejecting the larger spending package that invests in climate, child care and other Democratic priorities, despite Pelosi's pledge that both bills must be passed together.

The Chamber's new ad campaign targets Reps. Cindy Axne (Iowa), Angie Craig (Minn.), Antonio Delgado (N.Y.), Josh Harder (Calif.) and Elaine Luria (Va.), all of whom received surprise endorsements from the Chamber last year. It follows a letter from the Chamber warning that lawmakers who vote for the $3.5 trillion bill will lose the group's backing.

"No member of Congress can achieve the support of the business community if they vote to pass this bill as currently constructed," the letter read.

Those lawmakers are not among the group of 10 moderate Democrats who threatened to derail the reconciliation package - with the backing of business groups - in order to secure a vote on the bipartisan bill. The group of 10, led by Rep. Josh Gottheimer (D-N.J.), wants to pass the bipartisan infrastructure bill Monday, then continue to work on reconciliation.

Business associations strongly oppose measures in the reconciliation package to increase taxes on the wealthiest corporations and enact a minimum tax for companies that use deductions to avoid paying federal taxes. They're also attacking a proposal to allow the federal government to negotiate prescription drug prices, which would dent pharmaceutical manufacturers' profits.

The groups are now ramping up their lobbying efforts in support of the bipartisan infrastructure bill ahead of Monday's planned vote.

"We will not find durable or practical solutions in one massive bill that is equivalent to more than twice the combined budgets of all 50 states," Chamber of Commerce CEO Suzanne Clark said in a statement Wednesday. "The success of the bipartisan infrastructure negotiations provides a much better model for how Congress should proceed in addressing America's problems."

High-profile progressives, however, are promising to block the infrastructure bill until the $3.5 trillion spending package passes Congress.

That threat sparked a last-minute lobbying push from business groups to get House Republicans on board with the bipartisan infrastructure bill. They're hoping that GOP lawmakers can help moderate Democrats push the bill across the finish line.

The Association of Equipment Manufacturers (AEM), which represents companies like Caterpillar and John Deere, flew its members to Capitol Hill on Tuesday to rally GOP support for the bill.

"We're making the argument that this is a good bill, it is an infrastructure bill, and that they ought to put policy before politics and put aside any concerns they have about the larger reconciliation bill," said Kip Eideberg, AEM's senior vice president of government and industry relations.

The lobbying group only expects 10 to 15 Republicans to support the bill when it comes to the floor, noting that Republicans aren't opposed to the contents of the infrastructure package but expressed concern about helping Democrats pass a bill that party leaders have said is "coupled" to the reconciliation package.

"Everybody that we spoke to wants to be on board with infrastructure. There was not any hesitation that this is a positive move long-term for our country and our competitive advantage for the future," said Kevin Smith, general manager at Oklahoma construction equipment manufacturer Ditch Witch.

But House GOP leaders on Wednesday said they are formally urging their rank-and-file to oppose the Senate-passed bipartisan infrastructure bill ahead of Monday's vote.

The lackluster number of GOP votes might not be enough to overcome progressive opposition. As of Wednesday afternoon, at least nine progressive lawmakers had already indicated that they would not vote for the bipartisan infrastructure bill without reconciliation.

"At the end of the day, if we don't have the reconciliation bill done, the infrastructure bill will not pass," Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-Wash.), the chairwoman of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, told reporters on Tuesday.

"Try us," she said in response to moderates' suggestion that progressives are bluffing.

Progressives only hardened their stance after Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) reportedly indicated that he wanted to delay the reconciliation package until next year, all but dooming the chances of a swift passage in the 50-50 Senate.

They're being cheered on by progressive groups and climate advocates, who see the reconciliation package as a once-in-a-generation opportunity to overhaul the tax code and transition into renewable energy.

"Call their bluff and force your 'centrist' colleagues to choose between passing both bills, or neither," the Patriotic Millionaires, a group of wealthy Americans pushing for higher taxes, wrote in a letter to progressive lawmakers Wednesday.

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Just Jim NC TttH
Senior Principal
1  seeder  Just Jim NC TttH    3 weeks ago

What to do, what to do. Get reelected or get reelected.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
2  JohnRussell    3 weeks ago
Business associations strongly oppose measuresin the reconciliation package to increase taxes on the wealthiest corporations and (that) enact a minimum tax for companies that use deductions to avoid paying federal taxes. They're also attacking a proposal to allow the federal government to negotiate prescription drug prices, which would dent pharmaceutical manufacturers' profits.

I'm shocked, shocked, I say, that business groups want to keep avoiding paying taxes. Maybe they will throw their support to Trump. (Oh wait, that already happened. )

 
 
 
Greg Jones
PhD Expert
2.1  Greg Jones  replied to  JohnRussell @2    3 weeks ago

 Of course they will use any legal method to 'avoid' taxes.

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Senior Principal
2.2  Nerm_L  replied to  JohnRussell @2    3 weeks ago
I'm shocked, shocked, I say, that business groups want to keep avoiding paying taxes. Maybe they will throw their support to Trump. (Oh wait, that already happened. )

Consumers are going to pay those taxes anyway.  Corporations don't have a magic money tree; the money has to come from consumers.  Those taxes will require corporations to either increase prices or lower wages to pay the tax bill.  Democrats are only using smoke and mirrors to hide a tax increase on everyone.

Democrats can toss sand on the floor and do a soft shoe to persuade consumers that corporations will take less profit.  But the amount of profit is really determined by competition with corporations in China, Southeast Asia, Mexico, and anywhere else that exports to the United States and who won't see a tax increase. 

Democrats really are free trade neoliberals; they won't call for increased tariffs the way they demand increased corporate taxes.  Increasing tariffs and import duties (as a tax) won't be any more harmful to consumers than increasing domestic corporate taxes.  But increasing tariffs might lessen the disadvantages for domestic business and Democrats won't tolerate that.

Democrats can increase government revenue by increasing import duties and imposing revenue generating tariffs.  A tax on imports isn't any different than a tax on domestic business.  Consumers will pay more to provide the money for either one or both.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Masters Quiet
2.3  Ronin2  replied to  JohnRussell @2    3 weeks ago

I'm shocked, shocked, I say, that you still don't get that businesses don't pay taxes. Any tax increase will be happily passed along to the consumer (with inflation already high that is sure to sting). 

The only thing that Democrats are going to accomplish is price US goods out of consumers reach; and make China and the rest of the world we do business with very, very, happy. 

 
 
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