The Great American Songbook

  

Category:  Entertainment

By:  john-russell  •  3 months ago  •  17 comments

The Great American Songbook

The Great American Songbook, sometimes alternatively described as "standards",  is a form of popular music created mainly in the 20's through the 60's of the past century. To a large extent these songs were associated with Broadway musicals and movies of that era. They were popularized by the giants of music in those decades, such as Frank Sinatra, Bing Crosby, Nat King Cole , Ella Fitzgerald, Dean Martin, Rosemary Clooney, Margaret Whiting, Doris Day etc.   The Great American Songbook was written by Irving Berlin, Rodgers and Hart, Cole Porter, Johnny Mercer, Jimmy Van Heusen, Lerner and Lowe, Henry Mancini, Burt Bacharach, and many more. 

Today the Great American Songbook is certainly a niche genre, but it is being kept alive by numerous devotees in both the performing and listening communities. 



I've Got you Under My Skin - Frank Sinatra

Come Back To Me - Shirley Horn

My Foolish Heart - Cliff Richard

Anything Goes - Ella Fitzgerald

Moon River - Eric Clapton and Jeff Beck

My Future Just Passed - Margaret Whiting

Where or When - Diana Krall

Zing Went The Strings Of My Heart - Kristin Chenoweth

You'll Never Know - Willie Nelson


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JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1  author  JohnRussell    3 months ago

I Thought About You - Susannah McCorkle

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
2  Kavika     3 months ago

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3  Kavika     3 months ago

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
3.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Kavika @3    3 months ago
The official version of the creation of "Stardust" is that young Hoagland (composer Hoagy Carmichael) was in love with a girl called Dorothy Kelly, and one night, strolling across the campus of Indiana University, he came to the so-called "spooning wall". And, seeing the happy couples and pining for Dorothy, he looked up at the starry sky and started whistling a tune.

Which, even in his moony, lovelorn state, he recognized as pretty good. So he hastened over to a joint called the Book Nook that had a piano. "The notes sounded good," said Hoagy, "and I played till I was tossed out, protesting, still groping for the full content of my music."

Stardust: Sinatra Song of the Century #8 :: SteynOnline
 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
3.2  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Kavika @3    3 months ago

In it's day, Stardust was considered one of the great songs of the 20th century. 

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3.2.1  Kavika   replied to  JohnRussell @3.2    3 months ago

Nelson's album, ''Stardust'' is a collection of the classics such as Blue Skys, Don't Get Around Much Anymore,  and of course this all-time classic. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
3.2.2  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Kavika @3.2.1    3 months ago

Interesting choice.  Georgia On My Mind was also written by Hoagy Carmichael. 

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3.2.3  Kavika   replied to  JohnRussell @3.2.2    3 months ago

Yes, it was and he did write some classics.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
4  Drinker of the Wry    3 months ago

Forget about the war.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
5  author  JohnRussell    3 months ago

Try To Remember -  The Brothers Four

If I Only Had A Brain - The Four Freshmen

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
6  author  JohnRussell    3 months ago

A House Is Not A Home - Rumer

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
7  Kavika     3 months ago

First recorded in 1962 by Tony Bennett it has been sung by others and some duets with Tony, but no one sings this classic like Tony Bennett. 

I remember the first time I ever heard the song. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
8  author  JohnRussell    3 months ago

Our Day Will Come - Amy Winehouse

 
 
 
Vic Eldred
Professor Principal
9  Vic Eldred    3 months ago

There once was a Boston radio host by the name of Bill Marlowe. He devoted his entire show to his passion: Singers & Standards. Of course, he loved the originals. It was in the early 70's and Helen Reddy had a song out called "Leave Me Alone" and I happened to be scanning my car radio, when I first heard Marlowe. I heard him say "Leave Me Alone - they ought to bury you!" Then he played Ella Fitzgerald's "Isn't it Romantic. "  I got hooked very fast. Whenever I was in my car, I was tuned in to Marlowe.

BillMarlowe.jpg
"A Boston radio icon for much of his fifty year career, Bill was revered for his enthusiastic, emotional, and booming voice and his exceptional musical taste. A native of Boston’s North End, Bill began his career at WCCM Lawrence, moving to WBZ where he championed the songs and singers of the Great American Songbook and jazz vocalists. In later years, Bill was heard on WILD Boston, and WHET, Waltham. In the 1950’s he introduced thousands of listeners to the growing body of work by Frank Sinatra. As one Marlowe fan put it, “It was as if Bill were an extension of Sinatra and a part of the whole performance.” He had close personal relationships with Ella Fitzgerald, Nat King Cole, Sarah Vaughn, Duke Ellington, Sinatra, and countless others. Bill was a connoisseur of good foods, and a critic, and one of the finest salesmen in broadcasting history, he personally tested the products of potential advertisers before agreeing to take them on and to this day is remembered for his emotional ads for a restaurant where “the meat falls off the bone!”




So, yes John, you found it. It was music that put the singer out front. Music that was memorable.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
9.1  author  JohnRussell  replied to  Vic Eldred @9    3 months ago

I like this music for a couple big reasons, one is that you dont have to struggle to understand what they are singing. Because the lyrics were so important most of the singing of these tunes is done as clearly as possible. Sometimes there are jazz interpretations that "slur" the words, but that stuff is a little out of the mainstream. The second reason I like the "standards" is because they generally emphasize melody over rhythm , and I like hearing melody emphasized. 

As time goes by this music is receding more and more, although there are enough young people performing it to keep it alive for probably at least the rest of our lives, and of course there are the recordings. 

As Time Goes By - Peggy Lee

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
10  author  JohnRussell    3 months ago

For All We Know - John Pizzarelli

 
 
 
Dulay
Professor Principal
11  Dulay    3 months ago

 
 

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