300,000+ Russian coffins for an empire

  

Category:  News & Politics

By:  kavika  •  one month ago  •  68 comments

300,000+ Russian coffins for an empire


original

Like President Lincoln’s search for a general to defeat the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, Russian President Vladimir Putin is searching for his Ulysses S. Grant — a general who can bring him a victory, any victory, on the battlefield. Lincoln needed a general who would fight. Putin, under fire in Moscow, needs one who can finally find a way to win on the battlefields of Ukraine, regardless of the cost. Wooden coffins are cheap in Putin’s Russia; mobile crematoriums are cheaper. Russian conscripts to fill them are the cost of doing business.  

Gen. Sergei “Armageddon” Surovikin is Putin’slatest choiceto put those coffins to use. Promoted to head the Russian Army in Ukraine, the new general is eagerly embracing the use of “total war” tactics and is openly and brazenly targeting civilians and civilian infrastructure, including in central Kyiv, usingcruise missilesandkamikaze Iranian drones. Cover stories accusing Ukraine of bombing itself are a thing of the past. Putin’s army is overtly committing war crimes in full view — and in acquiescence to the talk show hosts, military bloggers and nationalists calling for a “scorched earth” policy in Ukraine.

Replacing one war criminal — in this case, Gen. Alexander Dvornikov, aka “the Butcher of Syria” — with another isn’t likely to change the outcome in Ukraine. It is yet another desperate attempt to achieve any semblance of success in Russia’s failed “special military operation.”

Both generals are said to be ruthless, but soldiers fight wars, not generals, and the willingness of the Russian soldiers in Ukraine and those being mobilized to continue the fight from Russia’s impoverished minority populations, is lacking and extracting a cost on the Russian psyche. Protests, mass defections across neighboring borders, open criticism in the Russian media, and violence at mobilization stations and training bases are Putin’s new normal.

More than700,000 Russiansreportedly have fled the country since Putin’s “partial mobilization” announcement, a tally that Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov adamantly rejects. Those who answered the call — or were shanghaied — found themselves on thefront lines within 10 days; woefully unprepared, many are returning to Russia in coffins and body bags. They werebarely trained or equipped; rather, expeditiously rounded up, processed, put into uniforms, issued weapons, and sent to the front lines — feeding Putin’s wood chipper to try to buy time for a retreating Russian army.

Reports of violence at mobilization stations and pre-deployment training centers reinforce the unwillingness of Russian citizens to fight and die in a war many neither understand nor support. In the Irkutsk region of Siberia, a man shot andkilled a recruitment officerafter a “pep talk” to avoid being drafted and sent to Ukraine. In the Belgorod region of southwestern Russia,11 soldiers were killed and 15 woundedin a “green-on-green” incident when two soldiers turned their weapons on them during a pre-deployment training event. 

The Russian military has proven itself inept in military operational art and combined arms warfare. At the onset of the war, they had all the pieces — soldiers, advanced weaponry, technology — but demonstrated an inability to fight as a combined-arms army, or an ability to sustain it, much to the astonishment of many military analysts, including retired Lt. Gen.Ben Hodges, former commander, U.S. Army Europe. What they didn’t have were the soldiers, noncommissioned officers and junior officers who could execute the plan.

Eight months into the war, after two failed major offensives, humiliating defeats to Ukrainian counteroffensives, and personnel losses exceeding U.S. losses for the entire Vietnam War, Russia once again returned to the basics: artillery, ballistic missiles, and air and drones strike to punish unarmed Ukrainian citizens. Putin has found a soulless general who evidently will heed the advice of nationalist TV talk show hosts andcarpet-bomb Ukraine until it is paralyzed. 

It’s no longer a “special miliary operation” or a war to liberate the oppressed Russian-speaking people from their so-called Ukrainian Nazi overlords, as Putin first presented it. It has become personal — or maybe it always was for Putin. Surovikin’s orders are to hold as much terrain as possible and inflict great damage to the Ukrainian capital and other population centers, along with Ukraine’s power grid and infrastructure.

To replenish his munitions stockpiles, Putin has acquired weapons and ammunition from his “arsenals of evil” — Shahed-136 “kamikaze” drones and Fateh-110 and Zolfaghar missilesfrom Iran, and ammunition from North Korea. Surovikin isrelentlesslytargeting Kyiv and other soft targets. Civilian targets are intended to invoke fear but serve only to harden Ukrainian resiliency. It’s a lesson the Kremlin has yet to learn. 

Not content with only Russian coffins, Putin is adding Belarusian coffins to the fray. He continues to lean on his Belarusian partner, President Alexander Lukashenko, to open a possible joint Belarus-Russian second front in the north to threaten Kyiv again. To date, it’s been more of a military demonstration to hold Ukrainian forces in the north; however, the rhetoric intensified on Oct. 10 whenLukashenko proclaimed, “Strikes on the territory of Belarus are not just being discussed in Ukraine today but are also being planned. Their owners are pushing them to start a war against Belarus to drag us there.” There is no evidence to support his claim; his statement may be a prelude to another false flag operation.

To withstand this strategy, NATO and the United States must provide Ukraine the air defense assets they have requested. NATO and the U.S. also must lift any restrictions placed on Ukraine for striking Russian targets beyond the Ukraine’s borders and provide them the extended-range munitions and intelligence they need to target the ballistic missile, drone and air launch points.  There can be no sanctuary for weapon systems fired from Russia or Belarus. When fired, they become legitimate targets.  

While the deep fight is being waged, the close fight — the counteroffensive — must continue. The relentless pursuit of Russian soldiers being driven out of the country, surrendering or defecting must be documented and uploaded to social media platforms such as Tik Tok, Telegram and Snapchat for Russian citizens to observe firsthand. The resistance is real.  

Putin apparently is willing to fill 300,000+ coffins for a Kievan Rus’ empire. Timber, after all, is plentiful in Russia. Ukraine, NATO and the European Union must take decisive action to ensure that Russian lumberjacks stay busy this winter. It is the surest and fastest way to end this war — and to put Putin and his coffin makers out of business.

Jonathan Sweet, a retired Army colonel, served 30 years as a military intelligence officer. His background includes tours of duty with the 101st Airborne Division and the Intelligence and Security Command. He led the U.S. European Command Intelligence Engagement Division from 2012-14, working with NATO partners in the Baltic.

LInk to seeded article...https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/300-000-russian-coffins-for-an-empire/ar-AA138y42?cvid=36e24d3b3e784358b38ceb84c4461aa0


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Kavika
Professor Principal
1  author  Kavika     one month ago

Following in the footsteps of Stalin.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
1.1  Ronin2  replied to  Kavika @1    one month ago

Stalin? Putin only wishes he could be Stalin.

Stalin defeated Germany by literally sacrificing his own people to starvation and the elements. Anything the Germans could use was destroyed as the Russians retreated. Russian snipers (with very low life expectancy) held cities stalling the German advancement. 

Stalin had the people backing him in the war against Germany. After the war Stalin was a hero; and able to leverage that into an unshakable hold (through atrocities) in his expanded Soviet Union. Putin cannot say the same thing. There will be no new Soviet Union. Putin has shown his forces to be weak, ill trained, badly equipped, and even worse badly lead. Putin, and even worse, Russia have lost their mystique. The only thing keeping NATO from rolling into Russia now is their nuclear weapons. 

It will take decades of rebuilding (if ever) before Russia is ever considered a world super power again. Putin will hold onto power; but the real question is for how long. There has to be a new colder, more ruthless, and smarter version of Putin out there looking for a chance to claim power. 

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1.1.1  author  Kavika   replied to  Ronin2 @1.1    one month ago

What I was referring to was the willingness of Putin to sacrifice his troops with no regard for their value which Stalin was famous for and he followed the Tzar's example.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Guide
1.1.2  Greg Jones  replied to  Ronin2 @1.1    one month ago
"There has to be a new colder, more ruthless, and smarter version of Putin out there looking for a chance to claim power."

OTOH, the rich oligarch's and saner military members might realize the futility of Putin's folly.

At any rate the US is "in ffor a penny, in for a pound", as far as this conflict is concerned

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Guide
1.1.3  evilgenius  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1.2    one month ago
At any rate the US is "in ffor a penny, in for a pound", as far as this conflict is concerned

McCarthy was just saying he wanted to cut off Ukraine as soon as he takes over the House. 

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.1.4  devangelical  replied to  evilgenius @1.1.3    one month ago

no problem, that means plenty of russian sympathizers will be looking for dirt naps in the US...

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
1.1.5  author  Kavika   replied to  evilgenius @1.1.3    one month ago
McCarthy was just saying he wanted to cut off Ukraine as soon as he takes over the House. 

Ah, Wannabe McCarthy with the backbone of a jellyfish and not as bright.

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
1.1.6  Ronin2  replied to  Greg Jones @1.1.2    one month ago
OTOH, the rich oligarch's and saner military members might realize the futility of Putin's folly.

If the rich oligarchs could have removed Putin they would have by now. 

As for saner military members. Saner maybe. Smarter, not so sure about that, as they sure as hell aren't showing it in Ukraine. 

IMO if Putin gets taken down it will be by someone in his mold. He built the system- it will take someone high up in it, well connected, and close to Putin to remove him. Someone like that will not be willing to share power with anyone.

Since Gorbachev Russian leaders have been growing more and more anti west and hard line. They have all failed in the same thing- stopping NATO/US from flipping former Soviet Border states. With Ukraine falling, unless Russia literally pulls their heads out of their asses and learns advanced military conflict, the next leader of Russia will be faced with NATO/US bordering their back yard. Plus a military too weak to face it.

Not sure even Stalin could pull that off.

 
 
 
cjcold
Professor Quiet
1.1.7  cjcold  replied to  devangelical @1.1.4    one month ago

Russian sympathizers like Trump?

Obviously Trump doesn't care for America or the rule of law.

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
1.2  devangelical  replied to  Kavika @1    one month ago

dead russians make better agricultural fertilizer...

 
 
 
al Jizzerror
Junior Expert
1.2.1  al Jizzerror  replied to  devangelical @1.2    one month ago

That heartwarming scene with the lovely chipper/shredder (that's running) certainly spread the "mulch" quickly.

Here's a shredder that was nominated for an Academy Award.  It would be perfect for dead Russian soldiers and Vladimir Putin (dead or alive).

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
1.3  Trout Giggles  replied to  Kavika @1    one month ago

Stalin knew nothing about warfare. The harsh elements in Russia was how he was able to defeat the Nazis

 
 
 
JBB
Professor Principal
2  JBB    one month ago

original

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Guide
3  evilgenius    one month ago

This is precisely why Russia is retreating for winter. At best Putin wants to hold on to Crimea, but the annexed territories will go back to Ukraine until spring unless something happens to hold off Russia permanently. 

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3.1  author  Kavika   replied to  evilgenius @3    one month ago

Putin is now reduced to attacking civilians and retreating.

 
 
 
evilgenius
Professor Guide
3.1.1  evilgenius  replied to  Kavika @3.1    one month ago

He's always been good at that. He learned how and where to hurt people as a KGB officer. 

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
3.1.2  author  Kavika   replied to  evilgenius @3.1.1    one month ago

Sadly, that is true, EG. Hopefully the tables will be turned on him.

 
 
 
cjcold
Professor Quiet
3.1.3  cjcold  replied to  evilgenius @3.1.1    one month ago

And figured out how to film Trump being pissed on by KGB whores.

And then came the blackmail on Trump.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
3.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  evilgenius @3    one month ago

Nukes don't care about the weather

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4  Nerm_L    one month ago

So, the war in Ukraine isn't going as expected?

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.1  author  Kavika   replied to  Nerm_L @4    one month ago
So, the war in Ukraine isn't going as expected?

Not for the Russians.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
4.2  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Nerm_L @4    one month ago

He never counted on the Ukrainians being so fearce. What he forgot is that when you are fighting for your home, you fight with heart.

 
 
 
al Jizzerror
Junior Expert
4.2.1  al Jizzerror  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @4.2    one month ago

jrSmiley_13_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4.2.2  Nerm_L  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @4.2    one month ago
He never counted on the Ukrainians being so fearce. What he forgot is that when you are fighting for your home, you fight with heart.

Eight years of war in Donbas, on Russia's border, and Russians didn't think Ukrainians would fight.  Kyiv fought Russian backed separatists for eight years and Russians thought the people of Kyiv would welcome them as liberators.  Interesting.

So, the war in Ukraine isn't going as expected?

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.2.3  author  Kavika   replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.2    one month ago

Once again, no it's not going as expected for the Russians.

 
 
 
pat wilson
Professor Guide
4.2.4  pat wilson  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.2    one month ago

Your commentary here since this all started sounds like you are a Russian backed separatist. It really does.

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4.2.5  Nerm_L  replied to  Kavika @4.2.3    one month ago
Once again, no it's not going as expected for the Russians.

I have no idea what the Russians expected.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.2.6  author  Kavika   replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.5    one month ago
I have no idea what the Russians expected.

Nor do I care if you do or don't. 

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4.2.7  Nerm_L  replied to  pat wilson @4.2.4    one month ago
Your commentary here since this all started sounds like you are a Russian backed separatist. It really does.

I don't want the United States to be drawn into another quagmire.  The United States has been at war my entire lifetime.  I have never known a United States at peace.  The same is true for my children.  I want something better for my grand children.  I do not want my grand children to know war.

I have also talked about the Minsk agreements quite a bit since this all started.  I have talked about the war in Ukraine that has been fought for eight years.  I have talked about killings and atrocities in Ukraine for eight years.  I have talked about the need for diplomacy.  

What have you been talking about since this all started?

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
4.2.8  devangelical  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.5    one month ago
I have no idea what the Russians expected.

just ask at the next family reunion...

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4.2.9  Nerm_L  replied to  Kavika @4.2.6    one month ago
Nor do I care if you do or don't. 

So, you do understand why the Japanese were interned during WWII.  You do understand why dissenters are treated as enemies.  You do understand the nature of war.

 
 
 
Revillug
Freshman Guide
4.2.10  Revillug  replied to  pat wilson @4.2.4    one month ago

According to website tracking sites, most thenewstalkers.com visitors come from the United States and the Russian Federation.

 

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4.2.11  Nerm_L  replied to  devangelical @4.2.8    one month ago
just ask at the next family reunion...

That wouldn't tell me anything about Ukrainians or Russians.  The only thing that family reunion would tell me is we shouldn't be involved.

 
 
 
pat wilson
Professor Guide
4.2.12  pat wilson  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.7    one month ago

I've made observations. You on the other hand seem to be cheering for Russia in this conflict.

 
 
 
Hal A. Lujah
Professor Guide
4.2.13  Hal A. Lujah  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.7    one month ago

I want something better for my grand children.  I do not want my grand children to know war.

War is everywhere.  Do you want them to read about it elsewhere and take comfort in being indifferent to the suffering of others?  When we ignore it long enough for it to end up at our doorstep, how should they feel then?

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.2.14  author  Kavika   replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.9    one month ago

I also KNOW that some of our Aleut people in Alaska were put in internment camps where 10% died from lack of care. 

I also know that American Indian Movement started in Minneapolis in 1968 because of police brutality and racism in MN.

I also know that if we don't support Ukraine in this war Russia's next step if they win in Ukraine will be Georgia and Moldova. 

I also know that Central Asian countries are separating themselves from Russia and Russia can't do a damn thing about it. I also know that in the western Caucasus the same thing is happening to Russia. 

I also know that Russia is slaughtering civilians including many women and children. 

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4.2.15  Nerm_L  replied to  pat wilson @4.2.12    one month ago
I've made observations. You on the other hand seem to be cheering for Russia in this conflict.

I've been making observations, too.  Whose observations have been closer to reality?

The cheerleaders have been telling us that Russia has been on the verge of defeat since the invasion.  The Ukrainians have been kicking Russian asses from the beginning.  Yet, here we are, almost 8 months later with demands for more weapons, bigger weapons, more advanced weapons to drive Russians out of territory they've captured.

The cheerleaders have been telling us that we can beat Russia if we only use more weapons and fight harder.  Kill more.  Destroy more.  Escalate the threats.  Intensify the fighting.  Yet the fighting goes on unabated.  More people suffer on both sides.  More people die on both sides.  But we will win in the end.  What will we have won?  Peace?

So, whose observations have been closer to reality?  We're supposed to believe that Russia started a shooting war to be defeated?  Russia is going to just give up?  

 
 
 
pat wilson
Professor Guide
4.2.16  pat wilson  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.15    one month ago

You seem to be suggesting Ukraine should just roll over.

What consequences should Russia suffer for this vile attack ? Any ?

 
 
 
afrayedknot
Freshman Quiet
4.2.17  afrayedknot  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.15    one month ago

Russia, Russia, Russia…this isn’t the Brady Bunch…who is the instigator and what is the motivation? 

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
4.2.18  Tessylo  replied to  pat wilson @4.2.16    one month ago

Its bizarre that he sees Ukraine as the aggressors here.

 
 
 
Tessylo
Professor Principal
4.2.19  Tessylo  replied to  pat wilson @4.2.4    one month ago

Yes indeed Pat.  100%

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4.2.20  Nerm_L  replied to  pat wilson @4.2.16    one month ago
You seem to be suggesting Ukraine should just roll over. What consequences should Russia suffer for this vile attack ? Any ?

What was wrong with the Minsk agreements?  There really was an attempt to avoid war.  Why was that attempt unacceptable?  Why wasn't there an effort to build upon that attempt to avoid war?

Russia did not invade Ukraine on a wild hair.  There is a history.  Ignoring that history to cheerlead for war won't succeed in establishing peace. 

Vietnam was a 30 year war; the United States tried to make the Vietnamese suffer for 20 years after withdrawing from Vietnam.  The United States has been trying to make the Iranian people suffer since 1979.  And we're supposed to believe the Ukrainian war will end when Russia is driven out of Ukraine?  How long will the United States try to make the Russian people suffer?  And how long will Russia try to make the Ukrainian people suffer?  When will there be peace?

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4.2.21  Nerm_L  replied to  afrayedknot @4.2.17    one month ago
Russia, Russia, Russia…this isn’t the Brady Bunch…who is the instigator and what is the motivation? 

The history is that Ukraine is an instigator, too.  The conflict between Ukraine and Russia began in 2008.  And that beginning conflict was over the price of natural gas and Ukrainian debt owed to Russia.

 
 
 
afrayedknot
Freshman Quiet
4.2.22  afrayedknot  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.21    one month ago

“And that beginning conflict was over the price of natural gas and Ukrainian debt owed to Russia.” 

So that gives Putin carte blanche in invading a sovereign nation? Bombing civilian targets? Threatening nuclear war? You defend the indefensible. 

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4.2.23  Nerm_L  replied to  pat wilson @4.2.16    one month ago
What consequences should Russia suffer for this vile attack ? Any ?

Isn't the consequences something Ukraine and Russia need to decide?  It's their war.

If the United States and NATO are using Ukraine to fight Russia - and - Russia is using Ukraine to fight the United States and NATO then Ukraine doesn't have a voice or a choice.  That type of fight isn't any different than divorcing parents using a child to fight each other.  That sort of fight is nasty and the real loser is the child no matter which parent wins.

 
 
 
pat wilson
Professor Guide
4.2.24  pat wilson  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.23    one month ago
Isn't the consequences something Ukraine and Russia need to decide?

No Russia has violated international law with their heinous war crimes.

 
 
 
al Jizzerror
Junior Expert
4.2.25  al Jizzerror  replied to  pat wilson @4.2.24    one month ago

Arguing with a Russian asset is like talking to a fucking wall.

512

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
4.2.26  devangelical  replied to  al Jizzerror @4.2.25    one month ago

... is asset french for ass?

 
 
 
Texan1211
Professor Principal
4.2.27  Texan1211  replied to  al Jizzerror @4.2.25    one month ago

So is talking to folks who see Russians everywhere!

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Freshman Principal
4.2.28  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  devangelical @4.2.26    one month ago

No, asset is an English word for:

1: advantage, resource

2: an item of value owned
3: military equipment
4: spy

Growing your vocabulary can be fun.

 
 
 
Revillug
Freshman Guide
4.2.29  Revillug  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.20    one month ago
Russia did not invade Ukraine on a wild hair.  There is a history. 

You mean like Russia invaded Ukraine in the 19th century and has no intention of letting it go again?

I'm going to go out on a limb here and point this out:

• Thenewstalkers.com is mostly visited by people located in United States, Russian Federation .

And ask you directly:

Are you writing your comments from within The Russian Federation?

There is no shame in that fact, I guess. But you are presenting yourself as a concerned fellow American.

The website traffic tracking sites make it a publicly known fact that a substantial portion of the traffic on TheNewstalkers comes from within Russia.

Are you part of that Russian Federation presence on TheNewstalkers?

And, if so, are your comments Russian propaganda? I mean, are you paid by your employer to write them here?

Or are you just a Russian citizen who is somehow not concerned about being drafted and sent to Ukraine and has a lot of free time to bullshit with Americans about the Russian war of choice in (the) Ukraine on a trivially small American website?

 
 
 
Revillug
Freshman Guide
4.2.30  Revillug  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.21    one month ago
And that beginning conflict was over the price of natural gas and Ukrainian debt owed to Russia.

Send in the tanks and launch the missiles!

 
 
 
Revillug
Freshman Guide
4.2.31  Revillug  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.23    one month ago
Ukraine doesn't have a voice or a choice

Ukraine has consistently asked for help in fighting Russia.

Comrade,

Вы думаете, мы глупые?

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4.2.32  Nerm_L  replied to  Revillug @4.2.29    one month ago
You mean like Russia invaded Ukraine in the 19th century and has no intention of letting it go again?

No, that's not the actual history.  Ukraine, as a nation state, has only existed for 100 years.  The Ukrainian borders that the United States claims to be defending are a direct result of the Soviet era of the 20th century.  Ukraine's history is not too dissimilar from that of Yugoslavia.

And ask you directly: Are you writing your comments from within The Russian Federation?

No.  I'm writing from the Midwest of United States.  You know, fly over country.  I doubt enlightened liberals are any more familiar with the history of the Midwest of the United States than they are with the history of Ukraine.

Or are you just a Russian citizen who is somehow not concerned about being drafted and sent to Ukraine and has a lot of free time to bullshit with Americans about the Russian war of choice in (the) Ukraine on a trivially small American website?

As usual, commenters are attempting to hide their own ignorance with bluster, emotion, and personal attacks.

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4.2.33  Nerm_L  replied to  Revillug @4.2.30    one month ago
Send in the tanks and launch the missiles!

The Kyiv government established by a parliamentary coup in 2014 did, indeed, send in tanks and launched missiles.  That's how the war in Donbas started.  The interim government in Kyiv used the military to attack Ukrainians that aligned with Russia.  The Azov regiment arose in Mariupol, as a militia, to capture the city and force Russian-aligned Ukrainians out of the region.  The Azov regiment really did use terrorism and torture in Mariupol.  Weren't you aware of that?

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Principal
4.2.34  Nerm_L  replied to  Revillug @4.2.31    one month ago
Ukraine has consistently asked for help in fighting Russia.

Not possible before 1992.  That's when Bill Clinton was President.

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Professor Guide
4.2.35  Thrawn 31  replied to  pat wilson @4.2.12    one month ago

Nerm has been a firm Russian supporter from day one. Apparently now that Russia is undeniably losing he is trying to change his tune. 

 
 
 
Thrawn 31
Professor Guide
4.2.36  Thrawn 31  replied to  Nerm_L @4.2.32    one month ago
No, that's not the actual history.  Ukraine, as a nation state, has only existed for 100 years. 

That is such a fucked up distortion of history that I am even more convinced you are a Russian troll. The history of Ukraine and Russia is... complicated at best, but to suggest that "Ukraine" wasn't a thing before the 1900s is retarded. 

The Ukrainian borders that the United States claims to be defending are a direct result of the Soviet era of the 20th century.

The US isn't defending anything, we are allowing the Ukranians to defend themselves. 

 
 
 
cjcold
Professor Quiet
4.3  cjcold  replied to  Nerm_L @4    one month ago

Kind of like Mahomes and the Chiefs against everybody else in the NFL.

 
 
 
al Jizzerror
Junior Expert
5  al Jizzerror    one month ago

A special coffin has been prepared for Putin.

512

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
5.1  author  Kavika   replied to  al Jizzerror @5    one month ago

Perfect!!!

 
 
 
devangelical
Professor Principal
5.2  devangelical  replied to  al Jizzerror @5    one month ago

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devangelical
Professor Principal
5.2.1  devangelical  replied to  devangelical @5.2    one month ago

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pat wilson
Professor Guide
5.2.2  pat wilson  replied to  devangelical @5.2.1    one month ago

With drought everywhere where can you dump it ?

 
 
 
al Jizzerror
Junior Expert
5.2.3  al Jizzerror  replied to  pat wilson @5.2.2    one month ago
With drought everywhere where can you dump it ?

Throw it into the Lake Mead Desert.

 
 
 
Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
5.3  Trout Giggles  replied to  al Jizzerror @5    one month ago

Oscar the Grouch is not going to take too kindly to you stealing his house

 
 
 
Dismayed Patriot
Professor Participates
5.3.1  Dismayed Patriot  replied to  Trout Giggles @5.3    one month ago

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Trout Giggles
Professor Principal
5.3.2  Trout Giggles  replied to  Dismayed Patriot @5.3.1    one month ago

I bet that's a good read

 
 

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