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The Year It All Went Wrong

  

Category:  Op/Ed

Via:  s  •  last year  •  19 comments

The Year It All Went Wrong
On August 9, 2014, 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by police in Ferguson, Mo

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T



It’s not often that the polling industry provides us with data pinpointing the precise year in which American social cohesion began to erode.   Gallup pollsters   recently published statistics illustrating where it all went wrong — at least concerning race relations in the United States.












Every year since 2001, with some exceptions, Gallup has asked American adults to rate the state of relations between white and black residents. In 2015, the number of respondents who told pollsters they believed race relations were either “very” or “somewhat good” fell off a cliff. The public’s perception of race relations never returned to the status quo ante 2015. Indeed, its decline has accelerated in recent years.

Gallup declined to test this proposition in 2014, but we can identify it as the year in which the country took a wrong turn through Gallup’s other race-related questions.

In 2014, 55 percent of respondents said they were “very” or “somewhat satisfied” with the “state of race relations” in America. The following year, just 30 percent agreed. By the summer of 2015, the number of adults saying they were “very dissatisfied” with relations between white and black Americans spiked by ten points from the same time in 2013. Only 17 percent of adults polled by Gallup said they worried a “great deal” about race relations in March 2014, which was in line with prior years. A year later, that number increased by eleven points.

So, what the heck happened in the middle of 2014 that radically altered the consensus around race relations in America? The most compelling explanation for this seismic shift surrounds the events that precipitated the Black Lives Matter movement. Or, more specifically, the commentary and pedagogy that followed the events that inspired the Black Lives Matter movement.

On August 9, 2014, 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed by police in Ferguson, Mo. Three weeks earlier, an officer in New York City was filmed incapacitating 43-year-old Eric Garner with a chokehold for the offense of selling loose cigarettes on the streets. He died in police custody as a result of his treatment. In both cases, grand juries decided not to pursue charges against the responding officers. Brown’s death was justified by the “ physical evidence ” presented to the jurors. Garner’s killing, however grotesque, did not violate New York statute (nor, the Justice Department later conceded, did the officer commit a prosecutable violation of   Garner’s civil rights ).

These events triggered months of sometimes violent demonstrations across the country — periodic episodes of looting and vandalism that, in 2014, were sights few had witnessed at such a scale since the 1992 Los Angeles riots. These two arrest-related killings are also responsible for mainstreaming the verbal ticks that have since become the price of admission into elite society. Among them, the notion that American race relations are, in fact, irreparable owing to America’s deep and abiding commitment to the repression of its minority population.

It was the year New York City mayor   Bill de Blasio   indicted the “centuries of racism that have brought us to this day” and revealed that he taught his biracial children to fear the police force under his control. It was the year   President Barack Obama   indicted racism as a “deeply rooted” feature of American society, even though he conceded that “things are better — not good, in some cases — but better” than they were in the civil-rights era. It was the year   New York   magazine reporter   Benjamin Wallace-Wells   identified a “tidal shift in the attentions of the post-Occupy American left, away from the subject of economic inequality and towards the problem of race.” It was also the year a concerted effort was made in the press to educate the public out of the view that race relations were all right.

On December 30, 2014, NPR looked into not just Gallup’s polling but surveys from the   New York Times , Pew Research Center, and CBS News, all of which showed either static or relatively positive trends in the general perception of race relations. This, according to the   sources with whom NPR reporters spoke , was a problem that needed fixing. “From a privileged perspective, things are, yes, dramatically different,” Tufts University professor Peniel Joseph said of the difference between 2014 and 1964.

What followed was a nearly decade-long campaign to educate Americans out of the belief that racial disparities in America had improved or even could improve. To hold an optimistic view on the subject became, at best, an expression of ignorance. It is impossible to gauge the degree to which Gallup’s respondents honestly believe race relations have worsened since 2015, or whether they know what they’re expected to say. Regardless, at least we have a good idea of when it all started going downhill.


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Sean Treacy
Professor Principal
1  seeder  Sean Treacy    last year

It is hard to overstate the amount of damage left wing misinformation and outright lies surrounding the justified shooting of Michael Brown have done to this country.  Demagogues like Elizabeth Warren to this day continue to lie and claim he was murdered in order to keep the outrage at a premium. 

 
 
 
Greg Jones
Professor Participates
2  Greg Jones    last year

Somehow, it's supposedly politically beneficial to the left wingers to keep stirring the racial pot and keep it boiling, in the meantime casting blame on everyone except themselves.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
2.1  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  Greg Jones @2    last year

Somehow, it's supposedly politically beneficial to the left wingers to keep stirring the racial pot 

That seems environmentally irresponsible.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
3  JohnRussell    last year

America has never had a comprehensive reckoning for hundreds of years of racism and discrimination. 

Do people really think it will never come?

Accept the past and it can be peaceful. A lot of whites are in denial. 

 
 
 
bugsy
Professor Participates
3.1  bugsy  replied to  JohnRussell @3    last year
A lot of whites are in denial. 

That;s true. Most white liberals continue their racist ideals to this day, while blaming everyone else for being racist.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
3.2  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  JohnRussell @3    last year

Exactly, the civil war was insufficient.  What do you propose for the follow-on?  

 
 
 
JohnRussell
Professor Principal
3.2.1  JohnRussell  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @3.2    last year

What did the Civil War do for the 100 years of open racial segregation, discrimination , and hatred that followed it?  Of course the Civil War proved to be insufficient. 

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
3.2.2  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  JohnRussell @3.2.1    last year

Again, what do you propose?

 
 
 
bugsy
Professor Participates
3.2.3  bugsy  replied to  JohnRussell @3.2.1    last year
What did the Civil War do for the 100 years of open racial segregation, discrimination , and hatred that followed it? 

Maybe you could have your leftist friends ask their ancestors, They were the ones to perpetuate all of it.

 
 
 
afrayedknot
Junior Quiet
3.2.4  afrayedknot  replied to  Drinker of the Wry @3.2.2    last year

“Again, what do you propose?”

Drinker, with all due respect…it is so, so easy to ask question after question after question.

You ask here for a solution. Where is yours? And if you consider it not worthy of an actual response, then let it stand. 

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
3.2.5  Sparty On  replied to  JohnRussell @3.2.1    last year

Reconstruction (extending rights to emancipated slaves) after the civil war was well underway.  

Alas, southern Democrats shut it down cold after Grant.

Cold.

Look to your own house as to why their rights were delayed ......

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
3.2.6  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  afrayedknot @3.2.4    last year

In comment 3. JR recognized that we never had a sufficient racial reckoning, he also speculated that if we accept the past , the reckoning could even be peaceful.  I don't think asking what he had in mind to be unreasonable.  

 
 
 
Ronin2
Professor Quiet
3.3  Ronin2  replied to  JohnRussell @3    last year
A lot of whites are in denial. 

You being front and center of them.

Keep making everything about race- it will come back to bite you in the ass hard. Keep playing everyone off against each other and soon you will have no one on your side. 

Is there some sort of Democrat slide rule for outrage? LGBTQ+ over everyone. African Americans second. Latinos third. Etc. Of course White, straight, and male and you get sent automatically to the bottom of the slide rule as you are offensive to everyone. There has to be a quick and easy way for leftists to get all on the same outrage page quickly. They simply aren't that smart to figure it out for themselves. 

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Expert
3.4  Nerm_L  replied to  JohnRussell @3    last year
America has never had a comprehensive reckoning for hundreds of years of racism and discrimination. 

Do people really think it will never come?

Accept the past and it can be peaceful. A lot of whites are in denial. 

What sort of reckoning would you propose?

 
 
 
JBB
Professor Principal
3.4.1  JBB  replied to  Nerm_L @3.4    last year

Obviously a reckoning through reparations.

Three... Two... One...

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Expert
3.4.2  Nerm_L  replied to  JBB @3.4.1    last year
Obviously a reckoning through reparations. Three... Two... One...

That requires more explanation that throwing out 'reparations' like some sort of buzz word.

The Black population is not an indigenous population so cannot legitimately claim a right of return.  The Black population cannot legitimately claim a right to territory or some form of independent self government.

The Black population could claim a right of repatriation but that doesn't seem to be an acceptable option.

The Black population could claim institutional preferences as a protected population as a form of repatriation.  But that has already been done.  The institutional preferences could be expanded but it's difficult to see how much more they can be expanded.

The Black population could claim a right to become wards of the state.  But that would limit individual choice.

The Black population could claim some form of monetary compensation.  But monetary reparations are finite and payment voids further claims.

So, what sort of reparation as a reckoning would be acceptable?

 
 
 
charger 383
Professor Silent
3.4.3  charger 383  replied to  Nerm_L @3.4    last year

Not one Damn thing

 
 
 
Nerm_L
Professor Expert
3.4.4  Nerm_L  replied to  charger 383 @3.4.3    last year
Not one Damn thing

Well, a call for reparations as a reckoning does require an explanation.  Explaining what reparations means does require making choices.  If the Black population won't make those choices then who can?

 
 
 
Sparty On
Professor Principal
3.4.5  Sparty On  replied to  JBB @3.4.1    last year

Yes, free money fixes everything ...... right?

 
 

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