Dig

Dig

The Garden Chronicles - Week 24

  
By:  Dig  •  Gardening  •  2 years ago  •  57 comments

The Garden Chronicles - Week 24

The weather has been fantastic. Dry, but cool and crisp for weeks now. Perfect early fall weather. I've started working on the garden fence again because of it, even though the rabbit threat is still a bit high to be taking wire down. I've been able to wrap it back around the corner I'm working on well enough at the end of the day without actually clipping it on, so no problems yet.

Something very rare happened last week. A flying squirrel visited the platform feeder in the backyard on at least three nights. They're nocturnal and I wouldn't even have known he was there but for the fact that I was watering late one evening and walked by that tree and noticed some unusual chirping coming from it. I grabbed a flashlight and a camera and managed to get several videos of him sneaking bird seed. I used a video editing app to make a little movie out of them. It's down toward the bottom.

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- Sunday, September 20 -


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An absolutely beautiful evening.

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Cool, crisp air.

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Rutgers tomatoes and Touchon carrots.

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Beets and turnips.

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Not one bit of green on the Bull's Blood beets.

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The other carrots.

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Lettuce.

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A Cimarron romaine (left) and a Red Mist.

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Beans. I have to admit it's a little depressing that I haven't had any all summer long, but they're covered with flowers, and there are several tiny pods starting to develop, so maybe it won't be long now. I am so looking forward to some fresh green beans.

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Looking back.

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The Maestro peas. Flowering now.

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The hybrid kohlrabi. I still don't see how they're only supposed to need 45 days like the packet says. I really doubt they'll make it before the first killing frost, but I guess we'll see.

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The spinach isn't doing well. The few plants on the right are all that's left. The other row has beets in it now, which, like the kohlrabi, probably won't make it before the first frost. If I only get baby beets I'll be happy.

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I picked most of the butternuts. There's only a few left in there still ripening.

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Looking back.

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The Big Beef tomatoes, almost spent.

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There's still a lot of fruit on them.

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Nice. No cracks on these, and very little bug damage. Fall tomatoes are usually pretty clean for me.

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Zucchini.

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The nearly-drowned peppers.

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Making some decent ones now.

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A few more. One of them is starting to turn red.

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Here's one on the other pepper plants, almost all the way red.

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The purple Cayenne peppers (mystery no more) are also turning red as they mature.

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Red hot chili peppers.

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More new beets where the first and second cucumbers were. Like the other new ones, they probably won't make it before the first frost, but I had a bunch of old seed and thought I'd give it a try.

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The third cucumber. Still producing, but slowing down.

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The half-trellis of Miragreen peas.

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The other full trellis of Miragreen. They're loaded with flowers.

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The cantaloupes are pretty much done now.

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From outside the fence. Still green, still going.

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I lost one of the zucchinis in the side plot. The vine exploded. I've had that happen before, but I have no idea what causes it.

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The last two lettuces in the starting planter. They may not make it to any appreciable size, but the race is on.

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This year's butternut squash (35 of them), picked on Saturday (minus two or three still ripening), along with some other stuff picked the same night — a Red Mist lettuce, 6 peppers, and some Touchon carrots (from the half-row that was planted under boards in June).

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One lonely zucchini. It's been a horrible year for them, and I really don't understand why. The plants have grown, but would hardly ever set fruit. Maybe it was just a crappy variety.

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One of the butternuts, about to be cooked.

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Clean and orange throughout. Could be a bit darker, and they probably will be in a few weeks. They usually continue to ripen for a while in storage.

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I love it when they fit into a baking dish as if they were made for it.

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- Random flowers -


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Sumacs always seem to be the first to show any pretty fall color around here.

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An armadillo did this all over the backyard. I caught him in the act last night after dark, but he wouldn't let me get close enough with a flashlight to take a picture or a video.

Hey Texas, come and take your critters home. We don't want them.  jrSmiley_32_smiley_image.gifjrSmiley_4_smiley_image.png

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Check it out! This is the first point I've ever found on this place. The creek is dry and the weather's great, so I decided to walk it (for the umpteenth time) before the leaves really start coming down. I found it embedded edge-on in some gravel. I could hardly believe it.

Not really sure what kind it is. It looks Snyderish or Hopewellish to me, but strangely the notches aren't the same. One is a side notch, while the other is more of a corner notch (made that way, not broken off). Maybe it was just a practice point made by a novice and discarded? Then again, maybe the person simply lacked a sense of symmetry (or didn't really care about it). Whatever the case may be, the tip is still there, which is awesome. The only damage from the creek seems to be a single chip out of each blade edge, and I'm thinking the chert was heat treated (you can see a few pinks in it).

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- Trail cam shots -


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I picked up a deer feed block to see if I could get a little more action. The young'uns found it first on a foggy morning.

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Followed by something a little more interesting.

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I'm assuming Polly smells the deer.

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Here's the movie I made out of the flying squirrel clips mentioned above, followed by a few screenshots in case the video won't stream well enough for everyone.

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That's all for now.

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See you next time.

Tags

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Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
1  Buzz of the Orient    2 years ago

Got hungry when I saw those tomatoes.  I think I inherited a love of tomatoes from my father, who used to eat them like apples.

We couldn't keep the squirrels out of our birdfeeder as well, no matter what we tried to do.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
1.1  author  Dig  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1    2 years ago

I don't mind squirrels at the feeders. They can be entertaining. What made this one remarkable is that it was a flying squirrel. They're supposed to be all over North America, from Canada to Mexico, but they're hardly ever noticed because they're usually so quiet, cautious and nocturnal.

Cute little buggers, too. Did the video work for you?

 
 
 
Buzz of the Orient
Professor Principal
1.1.1  Buzz of the Orient  replied to  Dig @1.1    2 years ago

Kept stopping and starting.  What I have to do with those is allow them to play through even if it takes an hour, while I do something else, and then I go back to them when they are almost to the end, and push the place button on the "slide" under the image back near the beginning and it plays through okay.  I guess that's sort of like allowing it to download. 

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
1.1.2  author  Dig  replied to  Buzz of the Orient @1.1.1    2 years ago

I wish this site's player was more like YouTube's. I don't have the best internet out here in the sticks, but YouTube has always worked well for me. No idea what the technical differences are, but I really wish the platform managers could do something about it.

 
 
 
bccrane
Freshman Silent
2  bccrane    2 years ago

Growing season came to an abrupt end Saturday morning with a temperature of 27 degrees and frost the morning before and after.  Flint, 80 miles south, recorded a temperature of 30 beating the 1922 low of 33 for that day.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
2.1  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  bccrane @2    2 years ago

Sorry to hear that. We had two nights of around 45 but now we are back up into the 50's at night. 

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
2.2  author  Dig  replied to  bccrane @2    2 years ago

I hope early record breaking doesn't mean we're all going to have a rough winter this year. The past few winters have been really mild here. I'm a little spoiled by it.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
3  Perrie Halpern R.A.    2 years ago

Your garden is amazing, but I have to say, that your video of the flying squirrel made my day. Thanks for taking the time and great job editing. 

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
3.1  author  Dig  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3    2 years ago

Thanks. I'm really glad someone enjoyed it. It was fun.

I need to see if I can make one of the chipmunks filling their cheeks up with birdseed and then running as fast as they can across the yard to get back to the woods, with their little tails stuck straight up in the air. Makes me wonder if that's where the phrase 'high tailing it out of here' came from. It makes me laugh every time.

 
 
 
Perrie Halpern R.A.
Professor Principal
3.1.1  Perrie Halpern R.A.  replied to  Dig @3.1    2 years ago

My favorite little backyard critter are those chipmunks. I have a backyard full of them and I have gotten to know which one is which. We even have a fearless one who tries to yell at us when we come to close to his home. Cracks me up every time when he does that. But the one thing I have not been able to do is to get one on film. Maybe you will be luckier than me. 

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
3.1.2  author  Dig  replied to  Perrie Halpern R.A. @3.1.1    2 years ago

I've been able to take short clips of them before. The trick is I have to sit out there fairly close to them for a long time, keeping still so they ignore me, which becomes tedious. I might give it a try again soon, and see if I can get enough good shots to make a video with.

I kind of wish I had a real camera. One of those professional rigs, with a telephoto lens so I could get really good video from a distance and wouldn't have to worry about spooking what I'm filming.

Maybe that should be my next hobby. :)

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4  Kavika     2 years ago

Love all the photos Dig.

Well done.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
4.1  author  Dig  replied to  Kavika @4    2 years ago

Thanks, Kav.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.1.1  Kavika   replied to  Dig @4.1    2 years ago

Is your dog a Pittie or American bulldog?

Forgot to add that the video is great.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
4.1.2  author  Dig  replied to  Kavika @4.1.1    2 years ago

Not really sure what she is. The vet called her a Pit mix. She was a stray that showed up approximately a year old in Feb 2011, during a particularly cold spell with snow and ice on the ground. She was starving, all skin and bones, and half of her coat was missing from malnutrition. She had swollen teats, too, so maybe the person who had her before lived in some town somewhere and didn't want to deal with pups, and just decided to throw her away in the country instead. No idea what happened to them.

She was a pitiful sight to behold. I discovered her outside in the snow and ice, trying to claw her way under a frozen tarp that was on the ground by the wood pile at the time. It broke my heart to pieces. I've tried to pour nothing but love and security on her ever since.

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Here she was in May of 2011, about three months after her ordeal. The fur on her back had returned, but she was still missing some on her neck and chest. I was restoring an old rocking bench for the front porch at the time, and she had to come see what I was doing.

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This was her the next summer, gnawing on a giant bone treat. She had filled out, and her coat had completely returned by then. The grass was dead because it was the middle of that big 2012 drought, which started in June and went all the way to the end of September.

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And here she was the following winter, about two years after her ordeal, playing in the snow in front of the house, knowing she had food and a nice warm dog bed waiting for her inside by the fireplace.

Gotta say, I absolutely love that dog. She's getting older now, and I'm really going to miss her when she's gone.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
4.1.3  sandy-2021492  replied to  Dig @4.1.2    2 years ago

Aww, Polly was lucky she found you.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
4.1.4  author  Dig  replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.1.3    2 years ago

I was lucky, too. She's been about the best dog a person could ever have.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.1.5  Kavika   replied to  Dig @4.1.4    2 years ago

What a great story Dig. She is a Pittie mix. I work with pitties at the vocal shelter to get them ready to be adopted. Some have had some really horrible pasts and it takes time working with them. 

The last one I worked with was Carmella, a blue nose Pittie around 70 lbs. She had been in the shelter for a couple of years. She needed a lot of work and love. After six months of working with her she was adopted and is now living the life. 

My next project is Angel another pittie around 60 lbs who has been in the shelter for over two years. She love people and kids but not other dogs. It going to take a lot of work but I love doing it.

Thanks so much for rescuing Polly. 

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
4.1.6  author  Dig  replied to  Kavika @4.1.5    2 years ago
Thanks so much for rescuing Polly.

I'd do it over again in a hearbeat. She's been wonderful.

I don't understand why so many pit-type dogs are victims of cruelty. They're so smart, and so attentive and loyal. Something's just not right in the universe.

I didn't know you worked with shelter dogs. It's a very worthy cause. Good on ya, Kav.

 
 
 
sandy-2021492
Professor Principal
4.1.7  sandy-2021492  replied to  Dig @4.1.6    2 years ago
I don't understand why so many pit-type dogs are victims of cruelty.

Because some people are trash.  A friend of mine has a rescue pit bull mix that was used as bait in dogfighting.  I can't imagine deliberately letting some poor dog be torn to pieces, repeatedly, for sport.

As it happens, he turned out to be just the sweetest pet.  A scratch of his ears, a rub of his belly, and he's your friend for life.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.1.8  Kavika   replied to  Dig @4.1.6    2 years ago

Some scum called people to train them to be fighting dogs. IMO, each of these people should be put down. 

For decades the various pit bull breeds were known as ''Nanny Dogs'' because of their love and protection of children. 

When my kids were growing up we had two pitties, Brandy and Puki, they were the kid's playmates for the first 14 years of their lives. When they reached the end by kids were 14 and 16. and they cried for months after. After all they years they both have photos of themselves and the ''sweet girls'' as I called them in all their family photo arrays. I do as well. 

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Junior Expert
4.1.9  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.1.7    2 years ago

Yeah, living so close to Detroit, there's a couple rescues that are dedicated to only pit or pit mixed breeds. We rescued our Rocky. He was found in front of an abandoned home, chained to a tree. He was a little thin, but not emaciated; so, I can't imagine he was there for too long. The Great Lakes Bully Brigade in Southgate, MI rescued him and they kept him for about 6 weeks so they could determine his demeanor and regular behaviors. It worked out perfectly, because the husband and I were getting ready to go on vacation (the first in 10 years) when I came across him in their FB page. He's the best dog. We can leave our gates and garage open and he won't leave. He only chews on his toys. He's grown to understand that the cat isn't really fond of him. And he's SMART! Too smart for his own damn good sometimes. He's the biggest cuddly baby.

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Our cat is a rescue too. She's our 17.4 lb chunk (and she was 16 lbs when we got her).

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512 <-- The day we got her.

512 <-- Someone had a case of the Mondays.

She had been fostered at several homes, but she hates other cats. She had been adopted twice before we adopted her and returned; one returned her 2 years after they adopted her, because the young couple found out they were going to have a baby... still don't know why that was a problem. I've had two kids with cats in the house already. Her name is Palooza but we call her our discount kitty. We adopted her in November 2018; she was 3 (turned 4 in the following Feb.). In Nov. and Dec. the place we got her has "holiday deals" in which adoptions are 1/2 off. Normally, adoptions are $100 for cats and $250 for dogs. We didn't want a kitten, because quite frankly, most kittens are a pain in the rear end. My daughter and I had met Palooza the summer before we adopted her and I fell in love with her eyes and her attitude. She swatted a kitten away from her, knocking that kitten off of a large storage bin. jrSmiley_86_smiley_image.gif I found it comical. When we returned in Nov., she still hadn't been adopted out and she was miserable surrounded by all of those cats. They were behind on her rabies shot, so we ended up paying only $25 for the adoption fee; therefore, she's our discount kitty. She's been an awesome cat. She doesn't scratch anything that she's not supposed to; the only thing that she's done is pee a few times in places she shouldn't. It's been for various reasons, but basically because of stress from one thing or another.

Sorry for the derail from plants. I wish I could keep a garden like I keep my pets. jrSmiley_82_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
4.1.10  author  Dig  replied to  sandy-2021492 @4.1.7    2 years ago
Because some people are trash.

I was thinking the same thing, and in much greater numbers than I used to think.

As it happens, he turned out to be just the sweetest pet.  A scratch of his ears, a rub of his belly, and he's your friend for life.

I haven't been around a whole lot of pit bulls/mixes, but the ones I have been familiar with all seemed to have more of a connection to the people around them than some other breeds. It's as if they're more interested in communication than other dogs. They look at you and pay attention, as if they're really trying to figure out what you're saying, or what you want them to do. I guess it's called attentiveness (from what I've read) and they have it in abundance. And they're so eager to please. It's very endearing if you ask me. Other dogs I've known act downright oblivious, and just kind of do their own thing, no matter what you're trying to tell them or get them to do.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
4.1.11  author  Dig  replied to  Kavika @4.1.8    2 years ago
For decades the various pit bull breeds were known as ''Nanny Dogs'' because of their love and protection of children. 

Now that you mention it, I think I've read about that before. Especially in Britain around the turn of the last century, right? Before the jackasses started breeding them for fighting?

They used to have a really good reputation, from what I understand, and because of my experience with Polly it doesn't surprise me in the least. I think Petey from the little rascals was a Pit Bull, and so was the dog in the RCA logo (the one with the dog looking cock-eared at the gramophone).

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
4.1.12  author  Dig  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @4.1.9    2 years ago

Great pet stories. Thanks for posting that.

Your Rocky looks like a bundle of joy. He must be fun. Palooza too, she looks sweet.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.1.13  Kavika   replied to  Dig @4.1.11    2 years ago

Well into the 1950/60 in the US they were known as ''Nanny Dogs'' Dig.

The RCA dog, Nipper was a mix, Pittie and Fox Terrier. 

The original ''Pete'' was an American Staffordshire Terrier,(pit bull). 

The most famous war dog of all time was Sargent Stubby of WWI. 

Here is a great link to Sargent Stubby.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
4.1.14  author  Dig  replied to  Kavika @4.1.13    2 years ago

LOL. Fun story.

It's such a shame how their reputation has suffered lately because of scumbag owners.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.1.15  Kavika   replied to  Dig @4.1.14    2 years ago

Sargent Stubby is really a hero. A lot of soldiers lived because of his bravery. 

Ya just gotta love him.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Junior Expert
4.1.16  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Dig @4.1.12    2 years ago

Rocky is my cuddle bug. Palooza is a sassy kitty.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Junior Expert
4.1.17  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Dig @4.1.14    2 years ago

Kav can chime in here, but there's police departments that have started adopting pits / pit mixes for their K9 units; they're far less expensive, easier to train, extremely loyal and only aggressive when requested to be. Pit type breeds are loyal to a fault and that's why the a-holes that want fighting dogs use them... that and they're really strong.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
4.1.18  Kavika   replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @4.1.17    2 years ago

That is correct MsAubrey. 

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MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Junior Expert
6  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)    2 years ago

I sure wish I had a green thumb. I'm terrible with plants. It may have a little to do with our soil (clay and sand), but it doesn't seem to matter much, I tend to kill everything. 

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Expert
6.1  Raven Wing  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @6    2 years ago
I tend to kill everything. 

I hear that! I even kill false ivy. jrSmiley_74_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Junior Expert
6.1.1  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Raven Wing @6.1    2 years ago

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I thought it was bad that I killed an aloe plant and a cactus! jrSmiley_86_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Expert
6.1.2  Raven Wing  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @6.1.1    2 years ago
I thought it was bad that I killed an aloe plant and a cactus!

I don't buy anything plant wise for inside the house as it is DOA at the front door. And I am a big supporter of Mother Earth and all living things. So when a live plant in the house dies, no matter how well I take care of it, I feel very guilty. So I just take care of plants outside, and am careful which ones I get for outside. My gardens were always successful and very large, and did very well. So I just stuck with gardening and enjoyed both the goodies in the garden , and the fact that I was not killing any innocent plants.

 
 
 
MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)
Junior Expert
6.1.3  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka)  replied to  Raven Wing @6.1.2    2 years ago

I have yet to be successful with a garden. I can do trees (if they're already started) and flowers if they're outside, because Mother Nature really does most of the work. I try to do my research and make sure anything I plant will work with the existing soil type and zone. I try to start little trees in a pot from a seed, but the one I got a sprout from, my daughter overwatered and it died. jrSmiley_89_smiley_image.gif It was a Northern Catalpa. I can easily get more seed pods and try again, but I was so proud! I was sprouting a tree, in a pot, in my house! I planned on getting it about 6" or so tall and then transplanting it into a slightly larger pot to reach a foot tall before planting it in my front yard.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Expert
6.1.4  Raven Wing  replied to  MsAubrey (aka Ahyoka) @6.1.3    2 years ago

I never tried to raise a tree. My last garden was about 45 ft x 50 ft, and the only things that did not grow well was the corn. Thus, the following year I planted cabbage in its place and it did very well. I had Big Boy and Big Girl tomatoes, cherry tomatoes and Roma tomatoes. I used them for different things so I wanted the variety. Eggplant, lettuce, onions, radishes, more of the staple veggies. And lots of herbs that support the many different cuisines I like to cook. 

I used the cabbages for making Hungarian stuffed cabbage, which is one of my favorites. 

Since there is only me left of my family now I don't cook that much anymore. Where I live now there is a community garden area that I planted a few things in, but, was not able to reap anything from it as others, who likely did not contribute to the garden took all the goods and damaged the plants in the process that they all died. So now I just buy what I want at the store. But, I truly do miss my gardening, it was very uplifting to lose myself in Mother Earth's arms.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
6.1.5  author  Dig  replied to  Raven Wing @6.1.4    2 years ago

In community gardens people help themselves to other people's stuff?

That blows. I wouldn't like that at all.

I thought they were just a way for people without garden space to have access to some good dirt in order to grow a few things. I always figured people just shared the work of watering and maintaining aisles and stuff, but that whatever they grew was their own.

Do people expect to take anything they want, no matter who grew what?

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Expert
6.1.6  Raven Wing  replied to  Dig @6.1.5    2 years ago
Do people expect to take anything they want, no matter who grew what?

Yep. I was really excited when I was shown the community garden before I moved in to the complex, as I do love to garden. I was assigned my small area in the garden area when I moved in, and decided what I wanted to plant for me.

All went well, I tilled my area, planted the seeds and tended it every day. I talked to my plants as they sprouted and gave them lots of compliments and they grew very well. I was so looking forward to my small harvest, and if there was plenty I would have offered to share with some of the others. 

However, as the veggis ripened they were whisked off by others. Eventually, there was nothing left for me by vines and wilted plants. I reported to the Manager what happened, and he felt bad but could not offer protection for the garden area. So I didn't plant any more there.

I did put up a small two-tier stand on my small patio to grow some fresh herbs, but, as the herbs grew others would wait for me to leave home and then come and take them as well. I had an inkling at that time that it was not all others who were engaging in such actions, but, a couple of people who lived in and around the garden area so they could sneak in and out easily, and not too far from my apt. Although I could not see them do it, they always gave me the sly- eye glances when I walked by them. And I was not the only one who had their veggies taken without consent. 

It was a while later that the couple moved out of the complex and the veggies were no longer being poached from the garden area. But, I had just lost the desire to re-start my area, and gave it up for someone else to use. 

It is the saying.....no matter where, when or how, there is always at least ONE who will think only think only of themselves and take advantage of others, no matte what the bounty might be. 

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
6.1.7  author  Dig  replied to  Raven Wing @6.1.6    2 years ago

But they were thieves, right? It wasn't part of the arrangement that people could just take the produce of others, was it? 

I like the way they do it in Britain and other places around Europe: the allotment system. Undeveloped land in and around cities is divided into small lots that are usually fenced off from others, so people can have their own little garden plots, and even their own little potting shed for starting plants and storing tools. It makes it harder for assholes to mess with other people's stuff.

From what I've read there's never enough of them, though. Apparently the waiting list is super long to get one - in England, anyway. Once a person or a family has one they hardly ever want to give it up, according to the article I read. I can believe it, too. If I lived in a dense city and had an allotment, I wouldn't want to give it up either. I imagine they can be quite the refuge for city dwellers. They're probably great for people's health, physical and mental.

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
7  Ender    2 years ago

Still looking good. Not sure if I have ever tasted squash.

The tomatoes seem to have produced a lot.

Glad to see our celestial visitor still making an appearance.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
7.1  author  Dig  replied to  Ender @7    2 years ago
Not sure if I have ever tasted squash.

I kind of like it steaming hot and mashed with a little butter and salt on top. It makes a great side, and it's super healthy. Good for digestion, or so I've heard.

It makes pretty darn good pies, too (of the pumpkin variety). I think I might make one this week. Fall always makes me crave pumpkin pie.

The tomatoes seem to have produced a lot.

Unfortunately, I've had to throw a bunch of them away. I've been waiting too long to process them for the freezer, and they've been going bad. Laziness on my part.

Glad to see our celestial visitor still making an appearance.

That little guy cracks me up.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
7.2  author  Dig  replied to  Ender @7    2 years ago

Hey, how's the tree doing? I keep forgetting to ask. Did it settle in and grow any this summer?

 
 
 
Ender
Professor Principal
7.2.1  Ender  replied to  Dig @7.2    2 years ago

I think it did. It seems to be doing ok. The only problem I am wondering about, it has only had a few new leaves on top. It started growing what looked like from the ground. Looked like an offshoot starting to grow. I looked close and it is a new branch close to the ground.

I wonder if I should cut it or wait until it goes dormant.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
7.2.2  author  Dig  replied to  Ender @7.2.1    2 years ago

I think I'd wait. It probably needs the energy it's taking in from whatever leaves are on it.

 
 
 
TᵢG
Professor Principal
8  TᵢG    2 years ago

Quite amazing gardening prowess Dig.   I do not think I have ever seen an actual flying squirrel until now.   Cool stuff.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
8.1  author  Dig  replied to  TᵢG @8    2 years ago

Thanks, TiG. I'm running out of time, though. The wet spring really set my timetable back this year. Some of that stuff probably won't make it before it freezes. I've really got my fingers crossed for the peas.

I've only seen a flying squirrel a couple of times before, myself, and I've never seen one actually fly (or glide, rather). I didn't see this one do it either, but it was fun seeing him at the feeder. I've been checking every night, and he's gone now. I don't really understand why, because there's still plenty of birdseed out there. Maybe he'll pop in from time to time in the future, now that he knows where it is.

 
 
 
charger 383
Professor Quiet
9  charger 383    2 years ago

This year my garden was not as good as usual. Started off good, ate come cherry tomatoes, growing in hoop house in April  but they stopped until end of May.  Things just did not produce like they usually did and I did not have as much energy

This series help keep me motivated and I am already thinking about next year

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
9.1  author  Dig  replied to  charger 383 @9    2 years ago

I'm glad you've been enjoying it, Charger. I'm already thinking about next year, too. I think I'll plant a lot more peas and carrots in the spring than I did this year, and I'm going to make damn sure that I get some good bean seed. Not having summer beans this year was stressing me out.

Hopefully next spring will be a normal one and everything will grow on schedule.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
10  author  Dig    2 years ago

I just read this on WebMD...

Health Benefits of Butternut Squash

What Butternut Squash Can Do for You

It’s a great hydrator. One serving of butternut squash is roughly 87% water , which can help keep you hydrated.

It’s good for your immunity . Like other orange-colored fruits and vegetables , butternut squash is full of beta- carotene and alpha-carotene. Your body converts them to vitamin A, which is important for your immune system .

It’s excellent for your eyes . Butternut squash has lutein and zeaxanthin, often found in yellow fruits and vegetables as well as eggs . Along with beta-carotene and vitamin A, these protect your eyes from ultraviolet rays.

Keep in mind that your body needs a bit of healthy fat to best absorb these eye -benefitting nutrients, so consider eating butternut squash with a little drizzle of olive oil.

It’s a good source of fiber. Foods high in dietary fiber can help keep your weight in balance and lower your cancer risk. Research shows that butternut squash can help reduce your risk of colorectal cancer, in particular.

It can help your blood pressure.   Butternut squash is high in potassium, which can help keep your   blood pressure   in check. Managing your blood pressure can reduce your risk for   stroke   and   heart disease .

Its fiber helps with   blood sugar .   Butternut squash contains a type of fiber that’s not digestible. If you have   diabetes , it can help keep your blood sugar from rising after eating. Butternut squash also has a low   glycemic index , which means that its carbs are digested more slowly. This also helps keep blood sugar from rising.

Eat more butternut squash, people. jrSmiley_2_smiley_image.png

 
 
 
pat wilson
Professor Guide
11  pat wilson    2 years ago

Fabulous harvest you have there ! Do you do canning ?

Love the flying squirrel footage. When I was a kid my father but up 3 or 4 birdhouses on trees around the perimeter of the yard. They were for Bluebirds but one year a family of flying squirrels took one over. So cool to see. 

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
11.1  author  Dig  replied to  pat wilson @11    2 years ago

You had flying squirrels in a birdhouse? That's awesome.

No, I don't do canning, but I've thought about giving it a try. I usually just freeze green beans, but it changes their flavor a little, and I bet canning wouldn't do that. Canned carrots would probably be nice, too. And canned tomatoes are always nice to have.

But I remember from my grandparents that it can be a hot and tiresome thing to do in the summer. Still, I may try a small batch or two next summer. Maybe.

Did you see the picture of the point I found in the creek? A couple of posts ago we were talking about them and I said I'd never found one here. Well, that's my first one on this place, and it was only about 100 ft. from the house.

 
 
 
pat wilson
Professor Guide
11.1.1  pat wilson  replied to  Dig @11.1    2 years ago

I did see that, that was a nice one ! I found one point and lots of worked pieces in a freshly plowed field not far from a river near the Ohio/Indiana border. There is a rich source of flint in that area.

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
12  Kavika     2 years ago

Dig, as you're aware of I do not have a green thumb. In fact, I'm quite hopeless when it comes to gardening except for one time when I planted a ''coffee tree'', it grew 50 feet the first year alone. It was amazing, people came from all over to see it. 

In Ojibwe we call coffee aniibiishaaboo begishkiboodek-gegiibozigamig. I usually just use the translatin of ''black water medicine''.

512

This is a true story from the Ozarks.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
12.1  author  Dig  replied to  Kavika @12    2 years ago

LMAO, Kav! That's hilarious.

I may have to try growing one of those. Is there a good decaf variety? jrSmiley_9_smiley_image.gif

 
 
 
Kavika
Professor Principal
12.1.1  Kavika   replied to  Dig @12.1    2 years ago

Sorry Dig, no decaf. You're going to have to take it like, ''bad medicine''.

 
 
 
Dig
PhD Guide
12.1.2  author  Dig  replied to  Kavika @12.1.1    2 years ago

LOL. Fair enough.