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Republican governors challenge UAW's southern autoworkers unionization push

  
Via:  John Russell  •  one month ago  •  5 comments

By:   IAN KAYANJA (WSET)

Republican governors challenge UAW's southern autoworkers unionization push
In January, during the annual State of the State address, McMaster blasted organized labor, claiming he would fight against unions "all the way to the gates of hell."

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CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCIV) — Six Republican governors, including South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster, signed a joint statement condemning United Auto Workers' push to unionize automotive factories in southern states.

The statement, signed by McMaster and the governors of Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi and Texas, comes on the eve of around 4,300 workers at a Volkswagen factory in Chattanooga, Tennessee, voting on whether to organize with the United Auto Workers in what will amount to a key test of the union's cachet.

"We have worked tirelessly on behalf of our constituents to bring good-paying jobs to our states," the governors said in the statement. "These jobs have become part of the fabric of the automotive manufacturing industry. Unionization would certainly put our states' jobs in jeopardy... Putting businesses in our states in that position is the last thing we want to do."

Alongside McMaster, Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey, Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, Mississippi Gov. Tate Reeves and Texas Gov. Greg Abbott have signed the statement.

McMaster posted about the statement on his website.

The 76-year-old governor has long held an anti-union approach when discussing workers and the economy in South Carolina.

In January, during the annual State of the State address, McMaster blasted organized labor, claiming he would fight against unions "all the way to the gates of hell."

Then in February, after a long-contentious battle with the International Longshoreman's Association, the United States Supreme Court gave the union a victory over the South Carolina State Ports Authority after opting out of hearing an appeal in a case that allowed unionized dockworkers the right to staff every job at a new container terminal in South Carolina.

To the decision, McMaster said, "we wish they had agreed to take it and they had gone our way" while vowing to continue fighting the case.

As for automakers' push to unionize southern factories, the six governors said they want to grow manufacturing in their states, but a union drive presents a threat to stop "growth in its tracks."

"The UAW has come in making big promises to our constituents that they can't deliver on," the statement reads. "And we have serious reservations that the UAW leadership can represent our values. They proudly call themselves democratic socialists and seem more focused on helping President Biden get reelected than on the autoworker jobs being cut at plants they already represent."

The UAW is increasing efforts to organize nonunion auto factories nationwide following success in winning raises for workers last fall after going on strike against Ford, General Motors and Stellantis in Detroit.

UAW President Shawn Fain told The Associated Press the labor group would target more than a dozen auto plants, including those run by Tesla, Nissan, Mercedes-Benz, Hyundai, Kia, Toyota, and Honda.

Several of these union drives are located in the South.

Voting at VW's plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee, will begin Wednesday. Vote totals are expected to be tabulated Friday by the National Labor Relations Board.

Workers at the VW plant, who make Atlas SUVs and ID.4 electric vehicles, said they want more of a say in schedules, benefits and pay, according to the AP.

"We want to keep good paying jobs and continue to grow the American auto manufacturing sector here," the governors' statement reads. "A successful unionization drive will stop this growth in its tracks, to the detriment of American workers."


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JohnRussell
Professor Principal
1  seeder  JohnRussell    one month ago
"And we have serious reservations that the UAW leadership can represent our values. They proudly call themselves democratic socialists and seem more focused on helping President Biden get reelected than on the autoworker jobs being cut at plants they already represent."

LOL

 
 
 
cjcold
Professor Quiet
1.1  cjcold  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one month ago

Far right fascists prefer their slaves not have a voice.

 
 
 
Drinker of the Wry
Junior Expert
1.1.1  Drinker of the Wry  replied to  cjcold @1.1    one month ago

Do you see autoworkers as slaves?  Do you think that they see themselves as slaves?

 
 
 
Gsquared
Professor Principal
2  Gsquared    one month ago

What gives workers the right to think they should have enough strength through collective bargaining to secure decent wages and benefits, and safe working conditions?   No wonder the party of the plutocracy vehemently opposes unions. 

 
 
 
Gsquared
Professor Principal
3  Gsquared    one month ago
In January, during the annual State of the State address, McMaster blasted organized labor, claiming he would fight against unions "all the way to the gates of hell."

That's an admission as to where McMaster wants to take the workers in his state.

 
 

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