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MBTI (Myers-Briggs) Part V: Which of the 16 MBTI Personality Types Makes the Most Money? Which makes the Least?

  

Category:  News & Politics

Via:  krishna  •  6 years ago  •  65 comments

MBTI (Myers-Briggs) Part V: Which of the 16 MBTI Personality Types Makes the Most Money? Which makes the Least?

(Of course these are averages for each type-- there will be some individual who vary greatly from the norm):

MBTImostmoney.png

If you don't already know what your personality type is, you can you can take a short answer test to find out:

1.One of the most popular is   16 Personalities.   Take the test, then take a look of the description of your type. Is  it a good description of who you are?

2. I also like the former   Celebrity Types   site. (It just changed its name & format and is now called   IDRlabs.com ). You can take the test  HERE,   and then click on your type. There is a list of famous people of your type, and another list of people of your type in popular culture. In addition, you can click on "Explore this Type" for a lot more information: links to 2 different articles describing each type, 2 videos describing each type, and more. (More info on NT is HERE ).

Or, for a "quickie" type indicator instrument, use this one-- its surprisingly accurate: 

mbti-grid-best.jpg


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Krishna
Professor Expert
1  seeder  Krishna    6 years ago

Generally speaking, between similar types (i.e. those that have the same first three letters and only differ in having the last letter be "P" or "J" . . . on average, those with a "J" earn more money than those with a "P".

(Why this is so is beyond the scope of this article :^)

 
 
 
sixpick
Professor Quiet
1.1  sixpick  replied to  Krishna @1    6 years ago

That figures.  I don't have either.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
1.1.1  seeder  Krishna  replied to  sixpick @1.1    6 years ago
That figures.  I don't have either.

Of the 16 types, all are described by 4 letters. The last letter is always either a P or a J. 

 
 
 
sixpick
Professor Quiet
1.1.2  sixpick  replied to  Krishna @1.1.1    6 years ago

Well mine is ENFJ-A.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
1.1.3  seeder  Krishna  replied to  sixpick @1.1.2    6 years ago
Well mine is ENFJ-A.

BTW, for some reason I still haven't figured out, that site adds "-A" to the types. (And I'm too lazy to check into it). You can ignore the A.

The standard notation for your type is ENFJ. (No A).

 
 
 
sixpick
Professor Quiet
1.1.4  sixpick  replied to  Krishna @1.1.3    6 years ago

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2  seeder  Krishna    6 years ago

"Full disclosure": I am an ENTP. 

 
 
 
sixpick
Professor Quiet
2.2  sixpick  replied to  Krishna @2    6 years ago

 
 
 
sixpick
Professor Quiet
2.2.1  sixpick  replied to  sixpick @2.2    6 years ago

Krishna, since you have two of them, does that mean you have a split personality?

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
2.2.2  seeder  Krishna  replied to  sixpick @2.2.1    6 years ago
Krishna, since you have two of them, does that mean you have a split personality?

I didn't understand your question. Two of what? 

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
4  seeder  Krishna    6 years ago
My daughter is also an ENTP. I am INTJ.

My experience of both types: in most cases they both tend to be highly intelligent. very curious, seekers of information. For that reason they tend to be very knowledgeable, & very logical. 

Despite this, in most cases-- (there are exceptions) ENTPs are often not the most successful in making money, and often not in creating material results in the real world. The reason is that we are true seekers of knowledge, and often once we obtain some knowlege , , , we want to continue to seek more knowlege!

INTJ are also seekers of knowledge. But in my experience, INTJs (& ENTJs), while they are also "seekers of knowledge"-- once they have enough knowledge to be able to act effectively-- they go out into the world and use it-- they create results.

ENTP/INTP are also seekers of knowledge as well-- but in most cases when they accumulate enough knowledge on a subject to go out and act-- they often don't. Rather than using that knowlege to act, ENTPs will often move towards seeking more knowledge  . . . about a new subject! 

(When INTPs accumulate enough action to act on, rather then going out into the wold to create results, they would rather continue to seek even more knowledge-- but on on the same subject!).

 
 
 
epistte
Junior Guide
4.1  epistte  replied to  Krishna @4    6 years ago
Despite this, in most cases-- (there are exceptions) ENTPs are often not the most successful in making money, and often not in creating material results in the real world. The reason is that we are true seekers of knowledge, and often once we obtain some knowlege , , , we want to continue to seek more knowlege!

That is my problem. In the US knowledge and logic are not in any way related to the creation of commensurate wealth.  I like to solve nerw problems and get bored doing the same thing, even if the money is good. 

 
 
 
sixpick
Professor Quiet
4.1.1  sixpick  replied to  epistte @4.1    6 years ago

I've found, go towards the money and work you tail off.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
4.1.2  seeder  Krishna  replied to  epistte @4.1    6 years ago
That is my problem. In the US knowledge and logic are not in any way related to the creation of commensurate wealth. 

xxxI've noticed the same thing. (Ironically, many folks claim to value knowledge and logic, but in actuality they don't have either trait...and in fact they often dislike people who actually are rational! (If anyone doesn't believe this, just read the comments in political discussion on any online discussion site...Heh :-). Or look at what happens, in reality, in most large U.S. organization, be they public or private.

like to solve new problems and get bored doing the same thing, even if the money is good.

I have the same problems in several areas of life-- I love solving new problems. But the same old same old problems lose my interest quickly (for example, boring things like making sure the laundry gets done, obtaining food, etc :-) Incidentally, some types love doing these Boring  (practical) things.

ENTPs are one of the most "inventive" types. They generally can come up with more ways (and more unique ways) to solve a problem than other types. (Words that describe ENTP: inventive, masterful debater, sometimes obnoxious debater lol, Devil's advocate, rational/analytical,/logical.. but we can also be a "visionary", and inspiring.

One website uses the word "Charming" for ENTPs-- many people would deny that as we can be so obnoxious in debates! But in fact ENTPs-- particularly more mature ones-- can be very charming and inspirational to large groups of people. 

That being said, each type does have many occupations for which they are well suited. (There's a lot of useful information online if you google it). And nNone of the types are better or worse-- they are just different.

(BTW one solution to this is for any given MBTI type to work closely with a few other whose traits are somewhat different than their but whose traits complement theirs. (Even many introverted types can work well with some extraverted types...one example: INTP & ENTJ).

 
 
 
sixpick
Professor Quiet
4.1.3  sixpick  replied to  Krishna @4.1.2    6 years ago
boring things like making sure the laundry gets done,

Thanks.  That reminds me.  I need to check to be sure I took the clothes out of the washing machine and put them in the dryer.

 
 
 
sixpick
Professor Quiet
4.1.4  sixpick  replied to  epistte @4.1    6 years ago

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
4.1.5  seeder  Krishna  replied to  sixpick @4.1.4    6 years ago

There are several good videos on YouTube for each type. And-- that was the first one I saw.

I used to think I was an INTP, not an ENTP. (While there are other some other important differences, I is more introverted, E more extroverted). I attend an MBTI discussion group that meets monthly. One of the members who has a thoprough knowlege of the system said I am definitely not an INTP but rather an ENTP. 

So before up on it, I decided to look at some YouTube videos. As soon as that one stared I was pretty sure she was correct, I am indeed an ENTP. Because the first trait they mentioned is curiosity-- and I would say that's one of my strongest personality traits. And then it mentioned another trait I strongly identify with. Not only are we ENTPs intensely curious-- but it often drives us crazy when other people aren't! And we attempt to get them to be more curious-- which almost always fails! (One reason many ENTPs find participating on sites like NT so frustrating...)

As a result of our curiousity, ENTPs and INTPs generally know more information (in general) than any other type).And we're curious about things whether or not that information may be useful! (Unlike ENTJ and INTJ who are curious as well-- but they tend to be only interested in information that may be useful and that will help them achieve results).

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
4.1.6  seeder  Krishna  replied to  epistte @4.1    6 years ago
That is my problem. In the US knowledge and logic are not in any way related to the creation of commensurate wealth.  I like to solve nerw problems and get bored doing the same thing, even if the money is good.

There is often more than one factor that determines success in any area-- including success at making money. Among others: a person's skills and abilities, the degree to which making money is important to them, their surrounding (what are the values of the society they live in), and some cases..just plain luck). 

And of course, while you may feel that living in the U.S. is a factor that holds you back-- the ENTJs I know also live in the U.S.....

And finally, while you mention that your logic and knowledge are not highly valued in the U.S., like you, ENTJs are "T types". (Thinking)  T types are very logical (just like you) . . . knowlegable and they do tend to accumulate knowlege!

The graph here shows that on average, ENTJs earn the most. Based on the ENTJs I know, I would say that the major factor in their success is their motivation-- success and making a lot of money is often a high priority for them. They are also into careful planning and tend to be charismatic leaders-- all of which contributes to their success. But their are other ways to be successful, different approaches are more likely to be successful for different types. (For example. "P" types are not naturally into meticulous planning. So they would be more likely to acheive success in other ways).

I think there's a lot fo truth to this famous saying:

This above all: to thine own self be true,

No MBTI type is better or worse than any other-- all have their own individual strengths and weaknesses. So based on your MBTI type-- it might pay to research why types of careers  (or jobs) your type is especially good at...?

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
4.1.7  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Krishna @4.1.6    6 years ago
No MBTI type is better or worse than any other-- all have their own individual strengths and weaknesses. So based on your MBTI type-- it might pay to research why types of careers  (or jobs) your type is especially good at...?

Epistte: 

Here's one site that may be a good place to start-- possibly a source of new ideas. They list their ideas on what profession is the best profession for each type. 

The best jobs for your personality type using the Myers-Briggs scale

While there are hundreds of quizzes, tests, and questionnaires cluttering up social media feeds and google results pages, none are as accurate or beneficial as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) personality test.

The MBTI test distills the collective population into 16 personality types. Breaking down personality types into extroverts (E) or introverts (I), sensors (S) or intuitives (I), thinkers (T) or feelers (F), and judgers (J) or perceivers (P), the Myers Briggs test assigns each personality type a 4-letter acronym. With it comes a personality description and how that personality behaves in families, friendships, and the workplace.

Unsurprisingly, the MBTI test has been used by businesses and professionals for decades to decide if a candidate is right for a position. In fact,   roughly 80% of Fortune 500 companies use the test   to vet potential employees.

Once you know your personality type, it’s time to get to the nitty gritty... (Cont'd HERE)

Actually I've seen several sites with some similar but some of the same ideas. BTW, did you say you were an INTJ? I have been meeting quite a few software Engineers & Comp[uter Programmers. Interestingly, the overwhelming majority are INTJs....

 
 
 
epistte
Junior Guide
4.1.8  epistte  replied to  Krishna @4.1.7    6 years ago
Actually I've seen several sites with some similar but some of the same ideas. BTW, did you say you were an INTJ? I have been meeting quite a few software Engineers & Comp[uter Programmers. Interestingly, the overwhelming majority are INTJs....

I'm already in mechanical engineering, where MBTI says that I belong.  I'm bored with the same old......

 Id slit my wrists if I had to write or debug code for a career.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
5  seeder  Krishna    6 years ago

I am not an expert on the MBTI. But (in summary) I've observed this (perhaps some over-generalizing but IMO usually true): 

1. Of the 4 NT types, The 2 "J" types tend to want to accumulate knowledge-- and then go out and create results. The 2 "P" types also want to accumulate knowedle, but their priority is accumulating even more knowedge (rather than acting on it).

2. My experience of ENTP types is that , basically, they go out into the world ans really "kick ass"-- creating big results. They are often successful corporate execs, for example. (INTJ are somewhat similar, but to a lesser degree.

3. Main motivations (in my experience):

  • ENTP: Intellectual excitement!   We love to learn new & exciting things. But when the novlety of topic becomes less exciting, we switch to learning about a new topic. (This rapid change of interest often leads to us not being as successful as we might be...often we often don't stick to one thing long enough). Also, since out main motivation is often discovering new information, ENTPs often lack attention to more mundane/"practical"matters).
  • INTP: Somewhat similar to ENTP. IMO the main difference is that INTP seeks information, but unlike ENTP who keeps switching,INTP continues to go deeper and deeper into learning about one subject. That's their main goal. . . unlike ENTP, they are like bulldogs-- once they latch on to learning about a topic  they won't let go. (INTP usually has more in depth knowlede about things than any other type). And like ENTP they tend to often ignore practical matters in their lives...they love important facts, but also  great re: learning about trivia!
  • ENTJ: Seek knowledge but are only interested if helps them creates results. Their main motivation is creating results.  And then they go out into the world and make things happen! (If I could be any type, personally I'd want to be an ENTJ). These people can be real dynamos!
  • INTJ: Many of the characteristics of ENTP. One difference is that they often lack the "people skills" that ENTJ has. ENTJ likes being with people-- or for that matter anything they can use to help them create results. INTJs often act the same, but often find being with people to be draining. (Sometimes people find younger INTPs to be a bit obnoxious... but often as they mature they learn how to deal with people in a nicer way.. :-)... My INTJ friends can be very judgemental...one thing most can not tolerate is stupid people, lol! :-)
 
 
 
magnoliaave
Sophomore Quiet
6  magnoliaave    6 years ago

ESFJ

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
6.1  seeder  Krishna  replied to  magnoliaave @6    6 years ago
ESFJ

I don't know many ESFJs-- but I think of them as "People people". (I tend to hang out perhaps too much with NT types..plus INFJs.)

ESFJ tend to be very sensitive to other peoples' feelings and needs.  (Both through their strong Sensing as well as Feeling functions) Strong values. And of course they are Extroverts. I think of ESFJ as really great in dealing with different types of people; "reliable, " (not wild and crazy like us ENTPs!)

Here's another site that gives good descriptions of ESFJ-- how well does this describe you?

(Note: There's a blank space after the first paragraph-- be sure to scroll down to see it all).

 
 
 
sixpick
Professor Quiet
6.2  sixpick  replied to  magnoliaave @6    6 years ago

 
 
 
sixpick
Professor Quiet
7  sixpick    6 years ago

Well, I'm an ENFJ and I stand on a bridge on weekdays. LOL

 
 
 
sixpick
Professor Quiet
7.1  sixpick  replied to  sixpick @7    6 years ago

 
 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
Sophomore Participates
8  Galen Marvin Ross    6 years ago

Mine.

 
 
 
mocowgirl
Professor Quiet
8.1  mocowgirl  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @8    6 years ago
Mine.

I am an INTJ.  So is my younger daughter.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
8.1.1  seeder  Krishna  replied to  mocowgirl @8.1    6 years ago
I am an INTJ.  So is my younger daughter.

From past conversations here, its apparent that you know a lot about the MBTI. (And of course especially about INTJs). What in your opinion would be some good careers for INTJs?

 
 
 
mocowgirl
Professor Quiet
8.1.2  mocowgirl  replied to  Krishna @8.1.1    6 years ago
What in your opinion would be some good careers for INTJs?

Like most people, it depends on their aptitudes and passions.

The occupation must allow ongoing innovation, education and challenge.  

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Participates
9  Raven Wing    6 years ago

I'm an ISFJ

 
 
 
sixpick
Professor Quiet
9.1  sixpick  replied to  Raven Wing @9    6 years ago

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Participates
9.1.1  Raven Wing  replied to  sixpick @9.1    6 years ago

Thanks, Six. It does tell it spot on. That is why when some here think they they know me, they really don't know me at all. That is the fun part too, (grin)

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
9.1.2  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Raven Wing @9.1.1    6 years ago
Thanks, Six. It does tell it spot on. That is why when some here think they they know me, they really don't know me at all. That is the fun part too, (grin)

While I've done some reading about the MBTI, most of what I know comes from the monthly meetings I attend, of a MBTI discussion group. So my impressions of the various types comes from people of the type I meet. Interestingly, we almost never have an "S" types attend-- so I am least familiar with are the "S" types. 

when some here think they they know me, they really don't know me at all.

I am the same way-- and offline as well. I'm not sure why-- I would have to research it to find out why. (In the other system of personality types I use-- Astrology__ its clear why).

Watching the video about your type that Sixpick posted, my first though was-- being on a site like NT must be a challenge for your type (NT is not exactly a site of peace and harmony-- nor is it a place where there's a lot of respect for other people).

 
 
 
lennylynx
Sophomore Quiet
9.2  lennylynx  replied to  Raven Wing @9    6 years ago

A Ghandi too, like me!  And our Ghandi group boasts the incomparable Dismayed Patriot...

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Participates
9.2.1  Raven Wing  replied to  lennylynx @9.2    6 years ago

Yeppers, I be a Ghandi. There are only a few of us here n NT that are ISFJ. I took the test before, and so did several others here on NT, so we know who the few of us are. It's fun. (grin)

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
9.2.2  seeder  Krishna  replied to  lennylynx @9.2    6 years ago

I had thought you had originally tested as an ESTP?

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Participates
9.2.3  Raven Wing  replied to  lennylynx @9.2    6 years ago

If I remember correctly, pat wilson was also an ISFJ. 

 
 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
Sophomore Participates
9.2.4  Galen Marvin Ross  replied to  Krishna @9.2.2    6 years ago

Well, this shows you can't really trust these things, I originally tested as a Ghandi type.

 
 
 
pat wilson
Professor Participates
9.2.5  pat wilson  replied to  Raven Wing @9.2.3    6 years ago

Yes, I am, big smiles

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
9.2.6  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Galen Marvin Ross @9.2.4    6 years ago
Well, this shows you can't really trust these things, I originally tested as a Ghandi type.

Actually there's a lot of value to this system, but in order to do that you have to put in a lot of time studying it. (I didn't do that-- I did read some books, but most of my understanding comes from interacting with people in a monthly MBTI study group I attend-- most people don't have that option.

Like every system, it has its pros and cons. One of its major downsides IMO is that the tests aren't that great. Often a person who takes it the second time gets a different result! (If they take it often they usually only get two different results rather than many-- but that's not good!).

For those people who really have a lot of self knowledge (which is a fairly rare trait in my experience) the best way is often to read the descriptions of the two types they get on the tests and decide which describes them more accurately. (Or better yet I was lucky enough to know several people who really know the system well, and helped me decide my type).

And of course most people aren't that interested in personality theories so understandably don't want to spend too much time with this...

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Participates
9.2.7  Raven Wing  replied to  pat wilson @9.2.5    6 years ago

Clapping  thumbs up

 
 
 
Galen Marvin Ross
Sophomore Participates
9.2.8  Galen Marvin Ross  replied to  Krishna @9.2.6    6 years ago

Both types that I got are kind of split in who I think I am. I received the Ghandi type the first time I took this, the second time is listed above, there are traits in both that I see in myself, I prefer to go with what I think I am rather than what people perceive me to be.

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
10  seeder  Krishna    6 years ago

Here's how the four letters work: For each of the fopur positions, there are two possible letters. 

1. The first spot may be either E (Extrovert) or I (Introvert). 

2. The second spot is always either S (Sensing) or N (Intuition).

3. The third spot is always either T (Thinking) or F (Feeling).

4. The last spot can only be either P (Perceiving) or J (Judging).

So, for example, the third spot: in this system you can either be a predominantly  "Thinking Type" or predominantly  a "Feeling Type". Which pretty much corresponds to the way most people think about it.

However you can be both an N (Intuitive Type and a T (Thinking Type)-- which is odds with many popular conceptions.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Participates
10.1  Raven Wing  replied to  Krishna @10    6 years ago

What does the INFJ letters mean?

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
10.1.1  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Raven Wing @10.1    6 years ago
What does the INFJ letters mean?

Introverted - Intuitive - Feeling - Judging

In some ways MBTI uses these a bit different than we commonly think of them. Here are each of the four positions of the letters

1. TYhe first letter maybe either I or E: One major aspect MBTI uses to determine this:  whether a person finds long periods with people to be draining (I. introverts) or energizing (E, extrtoverts).  And whether they find long periods alone to be draining (Extroverts) or energizing (iNtroverts).

2. Intuitive or Sensing: Does a person gets most of their information about the world via their Intuition ("hunches" that usually turn out to be correct, similar to mild psychic abilities-- or by just Sensing it (via their senses--  hearing, seeing, touch, etc). Sensing types are often artists (the sense of vision is very important to them) musicians (the send of hearing), etc. 

3. Feeling (Emotions are very important to them, they are not analytical types-- sometimes accused of being "illogical") or Thinking (mental type people, often very analytical, other types may accuse them of being "unfeeling")

4. Perceiving P or Judging J. Judgmental types are fairly judgmental (as the term is commonly used). But more importantly in the MBTI: Judgemental types tend to be organized and like structure & planning.  Perceiving types prefer spontaneity, but sometimes tend to procrastinate too much.

None of these types is better or worse than any other, although some people (depending upon their type!) may disagree.

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Participates
10.1.2  Raven Wing  replied to  Krishna @10.1.1    6 years ago

Thanks Krishna, they do seem to fit my personality somewhat. I don't really like crowds. Perhaps related to my Claustrophobia. However, I do like talking to people. Just about any subject is a learning experience for me. I guess you might say I am somewhat artistic. I am very creative and like creating graphics and create many Native American images to share with others. And I guess that is related to my being a Native American.

Being around people a lot tires me, especially, when what they are saying is boring. I don't mind being by myself and I can always find things to do to keep me busy. 

I am pretty intuitive, and Spiritual as well. I can see people's aura, and tell what kind of person they are. I don't think I am that judgmental, but, perhaps some people may think so. I don't really care that much about other people, and it is not my place to judge others. 

I am very dedicated to whatever I do, and want it to be as perfect as possible, even if it means going beyond the expected. 

I am also very protective of those I love, and of my rights. When people impose on my rights, or try to deny me of them for their own reason, I will stand firm in protecting my rights. When people threaten those I love I will stand firm to protect them. 

I like to help others, no matter in what way I can. I volunteer at Senior Citizens Centers to help where I can. 

I love animals of all kinds. And many of the critters that also share our earth. 

I don't know if that fits my INFJ, but, that's who I am. (smile)

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
10.1.3  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Raven Wing @10.1    6 years ago
What does the INFJ letters mean?

But if memory serves you are an "S"-- ISFJ, Not INFJ? (It can get confusing at first).

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Participates
10.1.4  Raven Wing  replied to  Krishna @10.1.3    6 years ago
But if memory serves you are an "S"-- ISFJ, Not INFJ?

Yes, the ISFJ was what I tested out to be before. However, in the current test it came out as INFJ. Not sure which is which now? But, I think I will stay with the first one, the ISFJ. That is what I tested out to be first, so I'll stick with that one. 

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
10.1.5  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Raven Wing @10.1.2    6 years ago
I don't think I am that judgmental, but, perhaps some people may think so. I don't really care that much about other people, and it is not my place to judge others.

I would have to think about whether or not the "J" types I know are judgmental. I actually have a few INTJ-type friends--- some of them can be very judgmental at times! (However, when they chose not to be they aren't...).

The term "Judgmental" in the MBTI is used in a way that's fairly different then the popular notion of judgmental. Here's a copy and paste I found of the difference between the two possible last letters of the four-- either P or J. Basically, J types prefer structure and being orderly and organized, P types are mainly the opposite.

P or J? Structure: What do you need from the world to feel most at ease?
[P] Perceiving (Open-Ended) [J] Judging (Structured)
-prefers flexibility & adaptability
-casual, spontaneous, likes options
-responsive, prefers freedom to choose
-works in bursts, pressured by deadlines
-chooses tasks according to need
-improvises, trusts process for results
-prefers decisiveness & closure
-orderly, systematic, resolute
-settled, sets plans to ensure completion
-dislikes last minute work, works gradually -likes predictability of routine, schedules
-methodical, linear steps towards goals

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
10.1.6  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Raven Wing @10.1.4    6 years ago

Yes, the ISFJ was what I tested out to be before. However, in the current test it came out as INFJ. Not sure which is which now? But, I think I will stay with the first one, the ISFJ. That is what I tested out to be first, so I'll stick with that one. 

There is a whole other level to the MBTI which I haven't even mentioned here at all-- because its more complex and detailled than people would want to go into. It has to do with "the functions" and the "function stack". But its too complex...

For each of the four Jungian modes (thinking, feeling, sensing, and intuiting-- there are two types of each! To distinguish which of the two types you are of those you mentioned, hinges on two things. One is this-- which type of Sensing so you have? They are called Se (external Sensing) and Si (Internal sensing). 

(Don't worry-- you don't have to know this :-)

I could ask you questions that would determine which of the two types of Sensing function you have:  Se or Si. That  would indicate whether you are  ISFJ or an INfJ.

But there's a better quicker way: here's a description of both-- do you relate more to one type than the other? If so, which one-- Se or Si?

[Se] Extraverted Sensing (Engagement) [Si] Introverted Sensing (Familiarity)
-attends to objective sensory facts-oriented to present & changing conditions-looks for novelty or intensity of change-experiences the world through “interaction”-seeks to maximize freedom & adaptability-trusts life & gets fully involved in events-short-sighted, no direction, easily bored -attends to subjective sensory details-oriented to categorizing incoming details-looks for familiarity in sense impressions-experiences the world through “comparison”-seeks to maximize continuity of experience-approaches learning/action incrementally-conventional, risk averse, easily anxious

The second way would be to determine if you are predominantly Sensing or Intuiting.... but let's try this.

(BTW if this is starting to seem to be getting too complicated...well, ENTPs and INTPs just love complex systems! Plus, of course, we analyze endlessly!)

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Participates
10.1.7  Raven Wing  replied to  Krishna @10.1.5    6 years ago

OK....I can see where they are coming from. 

-prefers decisiveness & closure
-orderly, systematic, resolute
-settled, sets plans to ensure completion
-dislikes last minute work, works gradually -likes predictability of routine, schedules
-methodical, linear steps towards goals

These are all things that I like and tend to engage in. Many of the jobs that I have had leave little, if any, room for error. Thus, I had to think very carefully of how things would be planned out, and then systematically proceed with the work. Each step had to be precise, and time was of the essence at all times. There was no room for second rounds, so every step of the way was critical to the finish of the end product. There were many hard lessons learned in mastering this concept, but, the end results was all that mattered. 

I have written plans for each day, and shopping lists for all that is needed. The unexpected that interrupts the written plans plugged into that days schedule. It may not work for everyone, but, for me, it is a must, and how I work best. 

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Participates
10.1.8  Raven Wing  replied to  Krishna @10.1.6    6 years ago
(BTW if this is starting to seem to be getting too complicated..

No, not at all. Remember, I'm a Technical Beta Tester, complexity and complication are part of that activity for the most part. Also, having been the owner and operator of my own light mfg business, designing wire products for the Supermarket, Drug stores and floral nursery industries, being able to work out the designs with as little complexity as possible from both a design and productions POV, as well as developing the first domestically produced plastic hand-held shopping baskets, does require a lot of hard thinking and research. So, let's go with the flow here..... 

After looking over the two sides, and considering the explanation of each, I do think the Si is the side that I most relate to. However, to clarify the 'easily anxious', for me that means that I am easily anxious and excited about things that are coming to the fore. Anxious and being excitable in a good way. When starting a new Beta or work project, I am always anxious to get started. So for me, being easily anxious is a good thing. 

However, I am not reluctant or adverse to take risks. Taking risks is part of the job when venturing into uncharted territory of any kind. If one is not willing to take the risk, then there is little to be gained. The rest of the Si list does pretty much match me. 

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
10.1.9  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Raven Wing @10.1.8    6 years ago
No, not at all. Remember, I'm a Technical Beta Tester, complexity and complication are part of that activity for the most part. Also, having been the owner and operator of my own light mfg business, designing wire products for the Supermarket, Drug stores and floral nursery industries, being able to work out the designs with as little complexity as possible from both a design and productions POV, as well as developing the first domestically produced plastic hand-held shopping baskets, does require a lot of hard thinking and research. So, let's go with the flow here..

Sorry if I wasn't clear. I didn't mean to imply that it would be too complex for you -- but rather that it was complex enough so most people here wouldn't want to spend a large amount of time learning it. 

Anyway, MBTI is based to a large degree on the works of Jung, and 4 functions: Thinking, Feeling, Sensing, and Intuiting. All people have all 4 of these-- but in different degrees.

This is often illustrated by a simple diagram. A person's strongest function is on top, its called their Dominant Function. Next , below that, is their Function. These two are the strongest. Third is the Tertiary function, and on the bottom the inferior function. There are twco parts to the Stack-- let's start with the position on the stack-- which functions are dominant.xxHeres's the function stack for your type ISFJ (its the clearest diagram I could find, it shows another type INTP, ignore that.

Look at ISFJ:
mbtiisfjfunctionstackl.png On top is your Dominant Function-- Sensing. Next is your Secondary Function-- Feeling (Emotions). Then your Tertiary Function =Thinking. Finally your Inferior Function, Intuition.

x(BTW you mentioned seeing Auras. I has always thought of that as an Intuitive thing (N) because its seems like its psychic. But its actually not psychic-- you are seeing Auras-- and seeing is a sense, one of the 5 Senses! So seeing Auras is actually a Sensation , not an Intuitive/Psych thing). People who see Auras are predominantly Sensing types- - its just that their Sensing functions is much, much more highly developed than most people).

I have noticed that most people exhibit mostly their top two functions-- so your are mainly a "Sensor" and a "Feeler" However I have a theory based on observation (I will have to research it to see if its true). And that is as people get older, in addition to using mainly their top two functions, t hey often strongly develop their Tertiary Function-- which in your case is Thinking. (Based on observation, I'd say T is very high;y developed in your case).

So one can understand a lot re: MBTI by learning about the 16 types-- but can learn it in more depth if you understand the functions. ( HERE's a good resource).

There are two parts to the Stack-- let's start with the position on the stack-- which functions are dominant.

The other part to the stack: While it shows the four functions and which is dominant, it also indicate whether each type is e (external) or i (internal). That will be in the next comment. 

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
10.1.10  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Krishna @10.1.9    6 years ago

The other part to the stack: While it shows the four functions  and which is dominant,  it also indicate whether each type is e (external) or i (internal). That will be in the next comment. 

At first glance, the diagram seems only to only show four functions-- and it shows which is dominant (by their height on the stack). However, there are actually not 4 functions but rather 8! There is an external type and an internal type for each of those 4 functions (Ignore INTP).

mbti-isfj-function-stackl.jpg

For example, there are two type of Sensing ("S"): Se ("External Sensing") and Si ("Internal Sensing").... Your Sensing is Si-- "Internal Sensing".

And the stack show that: when the oval is mostly to the left of the center line , that indicates the Internal Type-- if its to the Right it indicates the External Type.  (Your dominant Function Oval-- Sensing-- is to the left of the center line, indicating its Si, internal sensing.

(Which is also the one you identified with when you looked at the descriptions of Si and Se).

One of the best sites explaining this is the one I linked to earlier. .its HERE)

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
10.1.11  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Krishna @10.1.10    6 years ago

Here's me-- my innermost secrets revealed! [ENTP]:

mbtifunctionstackentp_gif.gif The first impression I give is heavily T (thinking type). People used to tell me to "get out of my head" and "get in touch with your feelings". And they were accurate to a large degree. (In the other system of personality traits I use-- Astrology-- I have strong Gemini energy-- which leads people to initially think I'm entirely mental...at least at first)

However, over the years I have been on a very spiritual path & have worked on it (Opening the Heart Chakra through Meditation, etc_ , and am now very much in touch with my F (Feelings). And I have come to realize how empowering it is to be not only using my Primary and Secondary Functions- but also now embodying my Tertiary Function (Feelings) & adding it to"my toolbox" :^)

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
10.2  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Krishna @10    6 years ago

This system is based to a large degree on the work of Karl Jung who was one of Freud's students. IIRC, Jung developed a system that characterized people as either Introverts or Extraverts, and either predominantly Thinking, Sensing, Intuiting, or Feeling.

Freud was very analytical (T)-- however while Jung was analytical, Jung's ideas also had a spiritual component. Interestingly, the four traits correspond to many systems in the West. For example, the four elements in Astrology:

JUNG - Astrological Equvialent

Thinking - Air

Feeling - Water

Sensing - Earth

Intuiting - Fire

 
 
 
Krishna
Professor Expert
10.2.1  seeder  Krishna  replied to  Krishna @10.2    6 years ago
however while Jung was analytical, Jung's ideas also had a spiritual component

 Its pretty much accepted that Jung was an INFJ.

BTW, The MBTI website "idrlabs.com " has an excellent section with examples of famous people of each type-- here's the one about INFJ.

(Many INFJ's are psychotherapists or counselors of some sort. And their type is often described as "psychic". 

 
 
 
Raven Wing
Professor Participates
10.2.2  Raven Wing  replied to  Krishna @10.2.1    6 years ago

Very interesting information, as always. Thank you for sharing it with us. It is always interesting to look beyond the norm. Being Analytical is great, but, being freedom of mind and let your Spirit enjoy freely exploring that which is beyond the norm is also great. 

 
 

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