THE REPUBLICAN PARTY IS DOOMED

  
Via:  john-russell  •  one week ago  •  39 comments

THE REPUBLICAN PARTY IS DOOMED
A quarter of Republicans were moderates in 2018, and 30 percent defected to the Democrats or stayed home in the midterms. This year, the secular conservatives and moderates who are the least enthusiastic about Mr. Trump moved away from the party, leaving it dominated by evangelicals, the Tea Party and observant Catholics.

S E E D E D   C O N T E N T


Stanley B. Greenberg (@StanGreenberg), a founding partner of Greenberg Research and Democracy Corps, is the author of “R.I.P. G.O.P.: How the New America is Dooming the Republican Party.”

This is a transformational moment. Do the Democrats understand how to take advantage of it?

The 2020 election will be transformative like few in our history. It will end with the death of the Republican Party as we know it, leaving the survivors to begin the struggle to renew the party of Lincoln and make it relevant for our times. It will liberate the Democratic Party from the country’s suffocating polarization and allow it to use government to address the vast array of problems facing the nation.

From listening to the waves of fraught criticism that followed each of the Democratic debates so far, you would not think 2020 was such a juncture. Commentators worried that the candidates’ anti-business policies and over-the-top plans for government would drive away moderate voters. They watched the candidates excite the Democratic base at the expense of independent voters whom they believe long for a return to bipartisanship. The commentators were just as befuddled that the Democratic candidates were critical of President Barack Obama, who knew something about “electability.”

Yes, Mr. Obama won in 2012, but he was the first president since Woodrow Wilson to win a second term with fewer Electoral College votes and a smaller winning margin in the popular vote over his closest rival than in his first election. Of course, Mr. Obama was met by a Tea Party revolt that helped push many white working class voters away from the Democratic Party, but his administration’s rescue of the big banks, along with prolonged unemployment and lower or stagnant wages for the whole of his first term, meant that the Democratic base failed to turn out and defend him in election after election. As a result, Mr. Obama presided over the crash of the Democratic Party in 2010 and 2014 that gave the Republican Party control of Congress and total partisan control in just over half of the states.

The elites who mostly live in America’s dynamic metropolitan areas were satisfied with America’s economic progress after the financial crash, but overall it helped make Donald Trump electable. He understood how dissatisfied the country was with the status quo. So rather than asking voters which candidate is more “electable” or who has the best chance of defeating President Trump, we need to ask which leader best understands this tumultuous period. Which candidate has a theory of the case that pushes aside other interpretations and critiques?

I learned as a young professor from E. E. Schattschneider’s “Semi-Sovereign People” and then later as an adviser to President Bill Clinton that those who figure out what the fight is actually about are able to set the agenda and motivate voters to get involved and pick a side.

The financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 left the vast majority of working people and the Democrats’ base of African-Americans, Hispanics, single women and millennials shattered for years. They lost much of their wealth and were forced into new jobs that often paid less. Many faced prohibitive student debt. With wages stagnant for a decade, they were frustrated with the daunting costs of health care, prescription drugs, child care and housing. Yet in the main, Mr. Obama, Hillary Clinton — and now Mr. Trump — hailed the economy’s progress, the millions of new jobs. But that was and is clueless. Mr. Trump will be the latest presidential candidate punished by the voters for not getting it.

The Democrats in the 2018 wave election did get it and made their biggest gains, compared with 2016, not in the suburbs — despite winning most of their new seats there — but in the rural areas and among white working class voters, particularly women. This pullback from Mr. Trump among white working class women in particular went further this year. As of 2019, he enjoyed only a single-digit lead with the voters who played such a big role in the 2016 surprise. In 2018, Democrats succeeded by attacking Republicans for attempting to repeal Obamacare and failing to lower skyrocketing prescription drug costs. They proposed trillion-dollar investments in infrastructure and battled to drive dark money out of politics.

Mr. Trump and the Republican Congress continued to seek the repeal of the Affordable Care Act, working both to make it fail in practice and to slash federal health care spending for seniors and the poor. That made health care the top reason for voting for Democrats in 2018, but it also revealed what has become a defining partisan difference: a Republican Party determined to destroy government outside of defense and a Democratic Party determined to use it expansively.

The Democrats today are reacting not only to Mr. Trump but to the Tea Party-dominated Republican Party that preceded and prepared the way for him with gridlocked government. After coming to power in the 2010 wave election, the Republicans tried to keep the government from addressing virtually any problem at all. The Tea Party movement was animated by its hostility to Mr. Obama and his activist government. Empowered in the House, it forced an I.M.F.-like budget austerity on the federal government and blocked any new economic stimulus and investment. As a candidate, Mr. Trump built his base among Tea Party Republicans and Evangelicals in order to carry forward the assault on government nationally and in the states. The Democrats watched in frustration as the government was presumed to be impotent to address wage stagnation, surging inequality, climate change, the slaughter from automatic weapons and the flood of dark money into politics.

But this dam has burst. With Mr. Trump’s ever-escalating assault on government, the proportion of Americans who say that government “should do more to solve problems and meet the needs of people” surged to the highest level in 20 years. Democratic candidates who understand this political moment will push for a government that changes the country’s course, as it did under Democratic presidents after the progressive victories of 2008 and 1964 and especially after the 1932 triumph of Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal.

Democratic voters today look at the chief executives of major corporations and they see the face of an era where greed was unchecked, where companies failed to invest in their workers and used their big donations and lobbyists to rig the political system against the middle and working classes. They are determined that government must do something not only about corruption and corporate excess, but also inequality, universal health care, the state of the working family, climate change, globalization, entrenched racial and gender disparities and more.

Any hopes for bipartisanship died when Mr. Trump seized the leadership of the Republican counterrevolution in 2016. He auditioned for the job as a “birther” who seemed viscerally committed to reversing the Obama legacy. Mr. Obama’s election and re-election represented the triumph of an America that was ever more racially and culturally diverse, younger, more secular, more often unmarried, with fewer traditional families and male breadwinners, more immigrants and more concentrated in the growing metropolitan areas.

As president, Mr. Trump did everything his Tea Party and evangelical base could hope for, from the attempted repeal of Obamacare to the Muslim ban, his championing of a border wall and the promotion of justices to the Supreme Court who could conceivably make abortion illegal again. Alongside this, his America First, populist trade policies cemented the addition of a large number of observant Catholics to his coalition.

And yet, his party is unraveling. A quarter of Republicans were moderates in 2018, and 30 percent defected to the Democrats or stayed home in the midterms. This year, the secular conservatives and moderates who are the least enthusiastic about Mr. Trump moved away from the party, leaving it dominated by evangelicals, the Tea Party and observant Catholics.

Many commentators on the state of the nation are not sure they can trust a majority of American voters on race — understandably so. They watched how important race and racism were to the Tea Party revolt and the pullback from Mr. Obama. They watched Mr. Trump defy nearly all of the predictions in 2016, when white voters’ attitudes toward African-Americans and Hispanic immigrants played such a huge role in his upset victory.

In the run-up to the 2018 election, Mr. Trump continued to call for the building of a wall and even sent troops to the border to protect Americans from the caravans that were supposedly escorting Muslim terrorists. Republican ad makers created Willie-Horton-type spots that featured undocumented immigrants who murdered Americans.

But Mr. Trump playing the immigrant card as president has made Americans more favorable to immigration and immigrants — almost two-thirds now say that immigration benefits the country. His attack on immigrants has created a growing consciousness that we are a country of immigrants.

Like it or not in Mr. Trump’s America, the Republicans will now be the anti-immigrant party and the Democrats the pro-immigrant party, confidently associated with America’s multiculturalism.

Few of those who worry that Mr. Trump’s exploitation of race and immigration will carry the day in 2020 noticed that his party badly lost an off-year election that Mr. Trump centered on immigration. Democrats won the House popular vote by more than eight percentage points. Republicans gained Senate seats mainly in deep Red states where, generally speaking, Republicans ran well behind Mr. Trump’s performance two years earlier.

This year, Mr. Trump extended his war on immigrants and immigration. Yet the percentage of Americans who say that immigrants strengthen the country and are not a burden has risen from 54 percent after the 2018 election to 65 percent now. This view is held strongly by 52 percent. Only 26 percent agree with the president that immigrants are a burden because they are accused of taking jobs, housing and health care.

American voters will not disappoint us again. Mr. Trump’s frantic efforts on immigration will not work. Taken as a whole, the voters want to affirm who we are as a country — and to marginalize a Republican Party that stands outside the mainstream on so much of our recent history, on civil rights and immigration in particular.

Democrats are seeking leaders who understand how transformative this election ought to be for both the Republican and the Democratic parties. The Democrats want a powerful, activist government after years of gridlock and political impotence. More than three quarters of them believe that sharper regulation of business is necessary to protect the public, that government benefits for the poor don’t go far enough, that racial discrimination still blocks black advancement and that stricter environment laws are worth the cost. Two-thirds believe that corporations make too much profit. They want a very different America from the one Republicans have forged.

When you combine Mr. Trump pushing moderates out of the Republican Party and the changing attitudes his rhetoric and policies have brought about with the Democrats’ pro-government fervor, you have a recipe for transformation. Democrats should be looking not just to defeat Donald Trump and the Republican Party, but to get to work building a bold era of progressive reform.

Stanley B. Greenberg (@StanGreenberg), a founding partner of Greenberg Research and Democracy Corps, is the author of “R.I.P. G.O.P.: How the New America is Dooming the Republican Party.”

Article is Locked

smarty_function_ntUser_is_admin: user_id parameter required
Find text within the comments Find 
 
JohnRussell
1  seeder  JohnRussell    one week ago

Because the GOP held onto the Senate, by winning re-election bids in red states, the true impact of the midterms was not made immediately clear.  The Democrats attracted the most votes in mid terms history. 

But ask yourself this question, will "moderates" who took a chance on Trump be able to look themselves in the mirror if they vote for trump again after his first four years?

 
 
 
MUVA
1.1  MUVA  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one week ago

Yes the alternative is much worse.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
1.1.1  Greg Jones  replied to  MUVA @1.1    one week ago

Much, much worse.

The current far left radical Democrat party, as it is now constituted and run, has no chance. They have lost the

working people and middle class. Probably half the women in America disagree with their policies on unrestricted

abortion, unregulated  immigration, and paying for health care for illegals, among other things..

Biden is their only moderate and is doomed to lose the nomination. The rest are not electable

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.2  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  MUVA @1.1    one week ago

There is no question that a majority wants Trump out.  The only challenge that is left is getting those people out to vote. If the anti Trump voters and pro Trump voters vote at an equal rate Trump is toast. 

 
 
 
cms5
1.1.3  cms5  replied to  MUVA @1.1    one week ago

Agreed.

Too much time is spent bashing Trump and absolutely no time is spent telling us which of the primary candidates for the Dems should receive our votes.

Doom and gloom Dems...they seem to hate the President, hate this Nation and absolutely hate the opposing party. They conflate legal and illegal immigration to benefit themselves...hoping to create mass hysteria. They conflated the travel ban of Nations that fail to vet...into a Muslim ban. Russian collusion, Russian dossier, wait for the Mueller report...impeach Trump because we don't like him! Oh woe is me! There's no doubt they wish the GOP would go away!

Yes...I can look at myself in the mirror and vote again for Donald J Trump. Jobs are better, finances are better...yep, many prefer a President who works for THEM...not a President who works for themselves.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.4  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  cms5 @1.1.3    one week ago
Doom and gloom Dems...they seem to hate the President,

He's an asshole, idiot, and pathological liar, of course people "hate" him.   DUH!

 
 
 
cms5
1.1.5  cms5  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.4    one week ago

What policy has he put into place that has made your life a living hell?

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.6  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  cms5 @1.1.3    one week ago
Jobs are better, finances are better...yep, many prefer a President who works for THEM...not a President who works for themselves.

This is basically bla bla bla. 

For average people the economy is very little different than it was under Obamas last couple years. 

When Obama was president a majority of Americans didnt have enough money saved to pay for a small emergency (couple thousand bucks)  without borrowing, and under Trump the same situation continues. Peoples salaries are a very very small amount higher than they would have been under the increases of the Obama years. For the median salary worker maybe they are making 500 dollars a year more than they would have been making under the Obama salary hike rates. Unless they save it for a year and then spend it all in one place, people wont even feel such an increase. 

The idea that Trump has been a tremendous boon for the working man is a myth. 

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.7  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  cms5 @1.1.5    one week ago

I dont vote for assholes and idiots just because they havent made my life a living hell,  and I wish you wouldnt either. 

 
 
 
Dulay
1.1.8  Dulay  replied to  cms5 @1.1.5    one week ago

Strawman.

 
 
 
Greg Jones
1.1.9  Greg Jones  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.4    one week ago
No, that's just your opinion, and you know what they say about opinions.

 
 
 
cms5
1.1.10  cms5  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.6    one week ago
For the median salary worker maybe they are making 500 dollars a year more than they would have been making under the Obama salary hike rates. Unless they save it for a year and then spend it all in one place, people wont even feel such an increase. 

Actually, salaries were stagnant under Obama. Increases in salaries were withheld to see what other restriction he'd place upon Small Business and Corporations. Trump removed many of those restrictions and salaries once again started to increase. There's also the tax relief seen...more money in the pockets of Americans.

What people do with their increases isn't an issue for the President...if they choose to spend or save, it's really up to them. It's easier to put food on the table and pay the bills. bla bla bla that to the bank. ;)

Meanwhile, a good majority of the Primary Candidates for the Dems will increase taxes...taking away hard earned dollars. How is that going to help the average person save enough for small emergencies?

 
 
 
Greg Jones
1.1.11  Greg Jones  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.6    one week ago

So you're saying he is as good as, and not worse than, Obama?

 
 
 
cms5
1.1.12  cms5  replied to  Dulay @1.1.8    one week ago

Just trying to find out why one should vote for anyone other than Trump. Many voters use platforms over personal like or dislike when they hit the booths.

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.13  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  cms5 @1.1.10    one week ago

Wage Growth Surged to a Seven-Year High in 2016

Although the December jobs report’s topline numbers weren’t a blowout by any means, there was one number that raised eyebrows — and spirits. Average hourly wages rose by 10 cents, representing the fastest gain since 2009 and bringing the annual growth rate to a tick under 3 percent.

====================

I think you will find that in general wage growth under Trump is about 1percent more than it was under Obama.  The last years of Obama it was roughly 2.5 per year and now it is 3.5 or so per year.  This one percent difference would amount to 20 cents an hour based on a salary of 20 dollars an hour, which is close to the median national wage. 

It's not that Trump has ruined the economy, of course not, its that his "best economy ever" is not a boon for much of the country.  And who's to say that if Clinton had won that wages wouldnt have increased that small amount just as they have done under Trump. 

His economy is basically a continuation of what came before, not a dramatic and substantial change for the better.   He does good at bamboozling some folks though. 

 
 
 
MUVA
1.1.14  MUVA  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.2    one week ago

I agree the problem with that is Trumps popularity in rural areas is rising and if that sector of voters ever decides to vote Trump will win easily 

 
 
 
Jack_TX
1.1.15  Jack_TX  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.7    one week ago
I dont vote for assholes and idiots just because they havent made my life a living hell,  and I wish you wouldnt either. 

I do vote against assholes and idiots who are promising to make my life a living hell.  So if you nominate Bernie, Liz, Kamala or Corey, I'm voting for Trump.  

 
 
 
Jack_TX
1.1.16  Jack_TX  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.6    one week ago
For average people the economy is very little different than it was under Obamas last couple years. 

You keep telling us about this horrific, awful, intolerable situation with the antiChrist himself supposedly in the White House....and now you're telling us things are "very little different than it was under Obama".

So what are you whining about?

 
 
 
Ronin2
1.1.17  Ronin2  replied to  JohnRussell @1.1.6    one week ago
This is basically bla bla bla. 

You mean like the upteenth article you have posted that the Republican Party is dead?

For average people the economy is very little different than it was under Obamas last couple years. 

Bullshit and you know it. You can post all the spin you want; but the economy has defied the gloom and doomers on the left- and has gotten better under Trump. Keep predicting that recession; maybe it will arrive just in time for a Democrat to take the WH- and receive all of the blame.

When Obama was president a majority of Americans didnt have enough money saved to pay for a small emergency (couple thousand bucks)  without borrowing, and under Trump the same situation continues.

Because the majority of Americans aren't fiscally responsible. Sorry, no socialist bullshit is going to change that.

Peoples salaries are a very very small amount higher than they would have been under the increases of the Obama years.

They are higher than under Obama; but still the bitching. Want to guarantee they will continue to go up with Democrats running the show?

For the median salary worker maybe they are making 500 dollars a year more than they would have been making under the Obama salary hike rates. Unless they save it for a year and then spend it all in one place, people wont even feel such an increase. 

More BS. Only a rabid TDDS could change a positive into a negative.

The idea that Trump has been a tremendous boon for the working man is a myth. 

The idea that Obama was a tremendous boon for the economy is a myth. He was wasn't any better for the "working man" either.  Just remember "Slowest recovery from a recession ever". Keep repeating that over and over again.

The only reason for BS articles like these are the Democrats are scared shitless of their insane exploding clown car of candidates running ever further to the left. They know their ideas will crash the economy, send corporations fleeing overseas, and shutter US businesses. It will increase the hourly wage; but increase unemployment much more. 

All they can run on is Trrruuuummmmmpppppp!!!!!

 
 
 
JohnRussell
1.1.18  seeder  JohnRussell  replied to  Ronin2 @1.1.17    one week ago

20 cents an hour difference in salary for the median wage worker is not "the greatest economy ever" for those people. Period, end of sentence, end of story.  Yeah, the rich have gotten richer, but that is not most people or most voters. 

 
 
 
Dulay
1.1.19  Dulay  replied to  cms5 @1.1.12    one week ago
Just trying to find out why one should vote for anyone other than Trump. Many voters use platforms over personal like or dislike when they hit the booths.

Really? How would John's answer to your strawman have informed you on who you should vote for? 

 
 
 
Jack_TX
1.2  Jack_TX  replied to  JohnRussell @1    one week ago
But ask yourself this question, will "moderates" who took a chance on Trump be able to look themselves in the mirror if they vote for trump again after his first four years?

Depends completely on who the alternative is.

Most moderates I know who voted for Trump did so to keep HRC from stacking the SCOTUS with militant leftists.  They knew any damage Trump was likely to want to do would be buffered by the limited powers of the presidency.  

They have been proven correct.  Trump's sole accomplishments seem to be a moderate tax cut and antagonizing stupid hysterical people who mistake Twitter for real life.

 
 
 
Dulay
1.2.1  Dulay  replied to  Jack_TX @1.2    one week ago
They knew any damage Trump was likely to want to do would be buffered by the limited powers of the presidency.  

Trump has managed to do plenty of damage, especially to our standing in the world and he has managed to buck just about every limit on the powers of the presidency. 

They have been proven correct.

Delusional. 

 Trump's sole accomplishments seem to be a moderate tax cut and antagonizing stupid hysterical people who mistake Twitter for real life.

Gee, Trump seems to have accomplished getting moderate Republicans to leave office and/or the GOP rather than continue to try to defend the indefensible. 

 
 
 
Jack_TX
1.2.2  Jack_TX  replied to  Dulay @1.2.1    one week ago
Trump has managed to do plenty of damage, especially to our standing in the world and he has managed to buck just about every limit on the powers of the presidency. 

You imagine that people in other countries liked us before.  They didn't.  You also imagine that average working Americans give a shit.  They don't.  They have much more pressing things on their mind that public opinion in Denmark or Dubai.

Delusional. 

By which you mean "failing to adhere to prescribed leftist hysteria".

Gee, Trump seems to have accomplished getting moderate Republicans to leave office and/or the GOP rather than continue to try to defend the indefensible. 

Would you want to work with him?  I sure as hell wouldn't.  Besides, congressional retirement is a very cush arrangement.

 
 
 
MrFrost
1.2.3  MrFrost  replied to  Jack_TX @1.2.2    one week ago
You imagine that people in other countries liked us before.  They didn't.  You also imagine that average working Americans give a shit.  They don't.  They have much more pressing things on their mind that public opinion in Denmark or Dubai.

Not true. 

https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2018/10/09/how-the-world-views-the-u-s-and-its-president-in-9-charts/

 
 
 
Jack_TX
1.2.4  Jack_TX  replied to  MrFrost @1.2.3    one week ago
Not true. 

You realize you've linked to an article that reinforces my first point and doesn't address the second. 

Throughout most of Europe, we have less than a 50% favorability rating.  

If you've ever actually been to Europe, you realize exactly why that's not surprising.

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
2  Sean Treacy    one week ago

These same pieces were written in 1974 and 2008... 

And 8 years later, the Republican Party was at it's highest point in 100 years.

 
 
 
Sparty On
3  Sparty On    one week ago

You are doomed .... doomed i tell ya.    Everything bad is your fault.   So you Republicans pack up your marbles and take off eh?   Everything good was done by Democrats.   So it's the Democrats game now ya hear, ya hear?   Yeah, you're doomed i tell ya .... so you Republicans better 23-skidoo out of here toot sweet before we sic the squad on you.

Hooray Democrats .... you be da bomb!

100%

 
 
 
KDMichigan
3.1  KDMichigan  replied to  Sparty On @3    one week ago
Hooray Democrats .... you be da bomb!

I'm wondering if JR Googled  "Republicans are done" and wondered if he would get a hit. I'm sure it was difficult to select a story from the last 30 years.

 
 
 
Sean Treacy
4  Sean Treacy    one week ago

For those interested in reality:

Per the NYT, the Democrats and Republicans enjoy identical 45/52 approval/disapproval splits. In 2018, the Democrats had a 10 point advantage. Now they are tied.

It's the end of the Democratic Party!

 
 
 
†hε pε⊕pレε'š ƒïšh
5  †hε pε⊕pレε'š ƒïšh    one week ago

THE REPUBLICAN PARTY IS DOOMED

Elephant meet Donkey!

384

 
 
 
Tacos!
6  Tacos!    one week ago

You have to bring more to the conversation than "I'm not Trump." Like it or not, people voted for Trump for specific reasons. Being against Trump is not a reason to vote for a particular person. NeverTrumpers on the Left and the Right just don't seem to get that. At best, hating Trump is only a reason to not vote at all. 

So, looking at the opposition, you have to ask "what are they offering?" In too many cases (perhaps all) they are offering ideas that would be deeply damaging to the economy or national security, i.e. government-funded everything and open borders. Democratic candidates spend most of their energy either apologizing for something (like who/what they are or what they once supported), engaging in oneupmanship virtue signaling, or arguing over who hates Trump the most. None of that is any more presidential than what we have now.

And what we have now, contrary to the dire predictions, is actually going okay. It's not legendary or anything, but life is moving along in pretty much the way it should. He hasn't burned the place down just yet.

 
 
 
Dulay
6.1  Dulay  replied to  Tacos! @6    one week ago
Being against Trump is not a reason to vote for a particular person.

That's funny since I can't count how many times I have heard that being against Clinton WAS the reason to vote for Trump. 

 
 
 
Tacos!
6.1.1  Tacos!  replied to  Dulay @6.1    one week ago

Depends on the choice in front of you. If the choice is A or B, very often people choose between the lesser of two evils. Sometimes that is the calculus. However, we are not at that point, right now. We are in the primaries and the question is which Democrat out of 20 or so do we want. In that context, simply being anti-Trump is not very useful. 

 
 
 
Jack_TX
6.2  Jack_TX  replied to  Tacos! @6    one week ago
Being against Trump is not a reason to vote for a particular person.

Meh.

Being against Bernie/Warren/Harris/Booker would be enough reason for me to vote for Trump.

 
 
 
Tacos!
6.2.1  Tacos!  replied to  Jack_TX @6.2    one week ago

Yeah but I suspect you object to their policies, and not their manners, speech, hairstyle, etc.

 
 
 
Jack_TX
6.2.2  Jack_TX  replied to  Tacos! @6.2.1    one week ago
Yeah but I suspect you object to their policies, and not their manners, speech, hairstyle, etc.

Bernie desperately needs a haircut, but that wouldn't sway my vote.

The fact that all of those people want to double my taxes so they can take away my healthcare....yeah...that's reason enough for me to vote for Trump.

 
 
 
Tacos!
6.2.3  Tacos!  replied to  Jack_TX @6.2.2    one week ago
Bernie desperately needs a haircut, but that wouldn't sway my vote.

I don't know; if he just shaved it and got a couple of tats, that might move me in his direction.

 
 
 
It Is ME
7  It Is ME    one week ago

"It will liberate the Democratic Party from the country’s suffocating polarization and allow it to use government to address the vast array of problems facing the nation."

Does that mean the Liberals will stop what they're doing so we can all "Come Together" jrSmiley_18_smiley_image.gif again, like it …… ummmmm……. well …....hmmmmmm …….Used to be ?

Seems to me.....ONLY "For the Few"..... isn't much of a platform to unpolarize the country ! The low,low,low Unemployment rate all around right now, should have already accomplished that !

But..… It's all about those few still ..... I guess !

 
 
Loading...
Loading...

Who is online


lib50


25 visitors